Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Microsoft Crime

Inside Microsoft's Digital Crimes Unit 72

Posted by samzenpus
from the throwing-crime-out-the-window dept.
jfruh writes "You may find it mildly creepy that Microsoft has a private police force, but the Digital Crimes Unit has helped real law enforcement do things like disrupt huge botnets. According to Richard Boscovich, assistant general counsel for the Digital Crimes Unit, Microsoft is only able to do all this by relying on the company's existing infrastructure, including its Azure cloud service. The DCU can provision compute time from the cloud as necessary to combat complex threats, he said, and also uses cloud services to share information with law enforcement agencies quickly."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Inside Microsoft's Digital Crimes Unit

Comments Filter:
  • by korbulon (2792438) on Thursday December 19, 2013 @09:10AM (#45735049)
    AKA the Windows 8 development team.
    • by korbulon (2792438) on Thursday December 19, 2013 @09:37AM (#45735181)
      A joke at Microsoft's expense moderated as Troll on Slashdot? Well now I've seen everything.
      • by fisted (2295862)
        You didn't honestly think /. wouldn't have its share of Microsoft fanboys?

        Best Regards, A member of the BSD fanboy fraction.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Microsoft doesn't have fanboys, Apple does. Microsoft has shills -- nobody but Microsoft employees, computer repairmen, antivirus companies, and MS shareholders have any love at all for Microsoft.

          Apple has fans.
          Microsoft has shills.
          Linux has zealots (I'm one)

          If Microsoft didn't suck I wouldn't be using Linux.

          • by Kalriath (849904)

            You know, you are probably also a Microsoft shareholder. I'd say practically every retirement/pension fund on earth has Microsoft shares in their portfolio, since they have decent dividends and almost never devalue.

            So what does this mean for your original point?

          • ++1. Too bad I run out of mod points.
      • by Nerdfest (867930)

        There seem to be a large number of even remotely anti-Microsoft posts moderated down heavily these days. It's looking very much like they're (still) paying people to hang out on Slashdot and other forums to try to boost their image. It could just be rabid MS fanboys, but that really seems unlikely.

    • I was thinking that the Office development team was renamed for few seconds...

  • by SirGarlon (845873) on Thursday December 19, 2013 @09:11AM (#45735057)

    And here I thought from the headline that TFA would be about a group at Microsoft in charge of *committing* digital crimes!

    (That would have been funnier 15 years ago. At this point, I would say if Microsoft needed a full-time team to commit crimes, it would be only so they could catch up to the competition.)

    • by Anonymous Coward

      That was true 15 years ago: how do you think Windows NT happened? They hired David Cutler from DEC, and he brought along the guts of VMS.

  • by stonebit (2776195) on Thursday December 19, 2013 @09:26AM (#45735133)
    Does this sound corrupt or what? They created the problem and now they have a solution, but at a cost. Sounds like double dipping into the customer's wallet.
    • by jader3rd (2222716)

      Does this sound corrupt or what? They created the problem and now they have a solution, but at a cost. Sounds like double dipping into the customer's wallet.

      So people or companies shouldn't try to fix problems they created?

      • by icebike (68054)

        Does this sound corrupt or what? They created the problem and now they have a solution, but at a cost. Sounds like double dipping into the customer's wallet.

        So people or companies shouldn't try to fix problems they created?

        Not sure I've heard anyone complaining, other than about the price of Azure services.

        It now appears Azure users are picking up the tab for building Microsoft's private bot army which it uses to take down other bot armies. Some of this is good, but you have to assume most of it is self serving. In addition to taking down hackers, we can only guess what else they might be collecting and who else they might be serving.

        I won't pay for Azure when I know significant parts of the infrastructure are intended only

  • by Anonymous Coward

    "Microsoft is only able to do all this by relying on the company's existing infrastructure, including its Azure cloud service"

    Yea sure, the cloud enabled you to do this. Infomercial much?

    • Re:Yea ok (Score:4, Insightful)

      by hawguy (1600213) on Thursday December 19, 2013 @10:29AM (#45735617)

      "Microsoft is only able to do all this by relying on the company's existing infrastructure, including its Azure cloud service"

      Yea sure, the cloud enabled you to do this. Infomercial much?

      I was wondering about that too -- how much compute power does it take to combat a Botnet, and why does it require Azure -- couldn't Amazon AWS would just as well?

      • Why use someone else's cloud when you can plug your own? That, and the money stays in-house instead of going to a competitor.
        • by hawguy (1600213)

          Why use someone else's cloud when you can plug your own? That, and the money stays in-house instead of going to a competitor.

          Well yeah, I understand why Microsoft uses Azure, but they make it sound like Azure is an important part of why Microsoft can fight off a botnet, when there are plenty of other cloud services out there that have similar capabilities.

          • by TFlan91 (2615727)

            My point wasn't how does Azure suddenly make this possible. My point was how does cloud computing in general make this happen?

            Anything you do on the "cloud", i can do in my basement.

            • by hawguy (1600213)

              My point wasn't how does Azure suddenly make this possible. My point was how does cloud computing in general make this happen?

              Anything you do on the "cloud", i can do in my basement.

              The cloud can make some things much more economical. If you need 1000 servers spun up within an hour and only need them for 24 hours, you're going to spend a lot more doing that in your basement than you'd spend at a cloud provider.

              • by hawguy (1600213)

                My point wasn't how does Azure suddenly make this possible. My point was how does cloud computing in general make this happen?

                Anything you do on the "cloud", i can do in my basement.

                The cloud can make some things much more economical. If you need 1000 servers spun up within an hour and only need them for 24 hours, you're going to spend a lot more doing that in your basement than you'd spend at a cloud provider.

                How did this get modded "troll"?

        • by icebike (68054)

          Why use someone else's cloud when you can plug your own? That, and the money stays in-house instead of going to a competitor.

          And why build your own cloud when you can have your users fund it for you. If Microsoft wasn't funneling off resources from Azure for their own pet projects, who much less would it cost the average user?

  • by Anonymous Coward
    In the digital justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important values. The ones who investigate crime and the zeros who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories. Dun Dun.
  • Not nearly quite as unsettling as the government having a public one.
  • Law and Order: DCU will certainly be a show within 2 years maybe?
  • Can be done with any of the cloud providers. They just chose azure but doesnt mean it can "only" be done with it like they say in the slashvertisement.
  • by BringsApples (3418089) on Thursday December 19, 2013 @10:56AM (#45735945)
    They may assist the police with some things, but what they mostly do is go around making sure that you have (the correct) licenses for your windows boxes. Anyone that's dealt with Microsoft's licenses knows that it's a huge mess that's difficult to understand as some licenses overlap in their design. Once you have the wrong license, even if the license that you have is much much more expensive than the one you need, these guys come at you bro, hard - as if you are a criminal.

    It's this very business model that we all loathe so.

Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it.

Working...