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Crime The Internet

Head of Silk Road 2.0 Says It Will Be Back In Minutes If Shut Down 222

Posted by samzenpus
from the never-going-to-die dept.
Daniel_Stuckey writes "It only took a month for the Silk Road 2.0 to go live after the now infamous Silk Road marketplace shuttered. One month. Should the budding deep-web bazaar experience the same fate as its predecessor, and be knocked out by authorities still whack-a-moling their way through the online front of the war on drugs, the Silk Road 3.0 would be up and running in 15 minutes, tops. That's according to the Dread Pirate Roberts, the pseudonymous head of SR 2.0. In what are arguably his most breathy public remarks to date the 'new' DPR, who either cribbed his handle from the DPR of SR 1.0 fame or who is indeed the original DPR, opened up to Mike Power on his long-term vision for the site."
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Head of Silk Road 2.0 Says It Will Be Back In Minutes If Shut Down

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  • Silk Road down? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by nospam007 (722110) * on Monday November 11, 2013 @04:42PM (#45394215)

    They keep using that word. I don't think it means what they think it means.

    I for one, welcome the new Dread Pirate Roberts.

    • Re:Silk Road down? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by lgw (121541) on Monday November 11, 2013 @04:47PM (#45394285) Journal

      If it was intentional, the choice of "Dread Pirate Roberts" for a handle was truly inspired. There will always be a black market underlying any economy, and I'm betting there will be an internet version of one going forward. While I wouldn't try to predict what it will look like, I have a suspicion that it will be called Silk Road for quite some time, one way or another.

      • by Soluzar (1957050)
        That was my first thought too. If they had this in mind, the choice of handle was really, really impressive.
      • by s.petry (762400)

        There will always be a black market underlying any economy, and I'm betting there will be an internet version of one going forward.

        That statement is only true for as long as we allow prohibitions and remain an "ignorant" bunch of sheople. I think the hope long long ago was that humanity would be educated and included in their own societies. Both of those things have become laughable concepts to today's "elite" class.

        That said, I too welcome Dread Pirate Roberts! If people can realize how asinine prohibition is, we have a chance to gain intellect discussing alternatives.

        • There will always be a black market as long as government tries to regulate commerce.
                    There is a illegal trade in unstamped / untaxed cigarettes. For money of course.
                    There is a illegal trade in unpasteurized whole milk (and the associated chesses.). Not sure why anybody would be against pasteurization but a few are.

          • by lgw (121541)

            Some people attribute unlikely properties to raw milk ("it cured me of lactose intolerance"). I suspect that for anything the government outlaws there will be some group who figures it must be great, because that's how the government works: the outlaw everything you actually want. Credibility is just one more casualty of the drug war.

      • Forgive me if I'm wrong, but wasn't the Dread Pirate Roberts a 'good' guy posing as a 'bad' guy? This has FBI shill all over it.

        • by aevan (903814)
          "Well, Roberts had grown so rich, he wanted to retire. He took me to his cabin and he told me his secret. 'I am not the Dread Pirate Roberts', he said. 'My name is Ryan; I inherited the ship from the previous Dread Pirate Roberts, just as you will inherit it from me. The man I inherited it from is not the real Dread Pirate Roberts either. His name was Cummerbund. The real Roberts has been retired fifteen years and living like a king in Patagonia."
    • Re:Silk Road down? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by LWATCDR (28044) on Monday November 11, 2013 @04:57PM (#45394407) Homepage Journal

      It's s Honey Pot.

      • by Squiddie (1942230)
        I see nothing wrong with pots of honey.
      • No doubt. Who is going to be high enough to fall for this... oh right.

        That is, after all, why going after drug users is so important to law enforcement. It's just too damned easy. Murder and Burglar investigations take all kinds of time and resources, screw that.

        • by Sarten-X (1102295)

          Of course, because all law enforcement resources are interchangeable. The financial guys are just fantastic in high-speed chases.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 11, 2013 @04:47PM (#45394287)

    We'll you know the last Dread Pirate Roberts wasn't the original Dread Pirate Roberts anyway. His name was Cummerbund. The real Roberts has been retired fifteen years and living like a king in Patagonia.

  • Missing the point (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Ralph Wiggam (22354) on Monday November 11, 2013 @04:51PM (#45394349) Homepage

    Having a working web site doesn't accomplish anything if nobody uses it, for fear of going to jail.

    Silk Road 1.0 didn't just get shut down. The Feds had complete access to it for months. If you use Silk Road 2.0 and end up in jail, it's your own fault.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      If you take the proper precautions, then it doesn't matter if they have access to it. It's through tor, so they don't have your IP. Use a completely new username and password for your account that you haven't ever used before. Encrypt any communication with the seller/buyer, such as the shipping address or tracking number, with GPG. That way only the seller/buyer see each other.

      Access the site through a secure machine (Tails LiveCD or a VM setup like Whonix) so that even if the browser is compromised with a

      • It would be pretty easy to MITM GPG encryption for anyone with control of the site. Simply display FBI or DEA controlled public keys for all sellers when logged in as anyone but the seller, the TLA agency then reads and forwards the message re-encrypted under the dealer's actual GPG key. The dealer never notices a problem unless they log in as someone else and review their own key. Whether this would work or not depends on the diligence of drug dealers.
    • Okay smarty pants, how many people have gone to jail due to dealings with Silk Road? I only know of one American, and I think one bloke down under who was pretty dumb.
  • by Agent0013 (828350) on Monday November 11, 2013 @04:57PM (#45394409) Journal

    I think that keeping the name Dread Pirate Roberts is very appropriate to the movie it came from.

    Dread Pirate Roberts:

    Roberts had grown so rich, he wanted to retire. He took me to his cabin and he told me his secret. 'I am not the Dread Pirate Roberts' he said. 'My name is Ryan; I inherited the ship from the previous Dread Pirate Roberts, just as you will inherit it from me. The man I inherited it from is not the real Dread Pirate Roberts either. His name was Cummerbund. The real Roberts has been retired 15 years and living like a king in Patagonia.'

    • by delt0r (999393)
      I think they need to work on their retirement plans. So far arrested does not equal, living like a king.
  • Sounds like Silk Road joins the illustrious company of ThePirateBay as one of those indispensable services running on Amazon Web Services without Amazon particularly noticing.

    (I wish Amazon hadn't called it AWS. It's not recognizable enough without spelling out Amazon, and you end up effectively writing Amazon Amazon Web Services or people don't know what you're talking about.)

    • by Mullen (14656)

      (I wish Amazon hadn't called it AWS. It's not recognizable enough without spelling out Amazon, and you end up effectively writing Amazon Amazon Web Services or people don't know what you're talking about.)

      I always call it EC2, and more or less, everyone in the computing business knows what that is.

  • Bah, there Intellectual Property rights there and a worldwide reputation that's being infringed you know. The Silk Road was built on the work of the DPR and he deserves to be paid for his intellectual endeavors!

    The new site is a cheap copycat fraud that fails to respect others rights. They threaten more clones like a game of whack a mole. No respect for intellectual property at all. How can you trust that kind of operation? Next thing you know the FBI will replace with front page with "It's a trap" and even

  • A new Silk Road went online and the value of bitcoins dipped nearly USD$50 around 24~48 hours ago. Is it related?

    • The value of bitcoins was obviously spiking in the past few days. So no. A drop was entirely expected irrespective of any silkroadyness.

    • The market capitalization of Bitcoin is far too large at this point for any Silk Road or darkweb market to play a considerable role in its value: nearly $4.1 billion as of this writing.

      Most of the increase in value has been attributed to the adoption of Bitcoin in China as well as fears in Europe over quantitative easing of the Euro.

      This caused Bitcoin to spike nearly 4x in value before coming down slightly by $50 yesterday. This is typical of a market "correction" when a security has become overvalu

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