Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Privacy Government United States

Germany: We Think NSA May Have Tapped Chancellor Merkel's Cell Phone 267

Posted by Soulskill
from the days-since-NSA-diplomatic-incident:-0 dept.
cold fjord writes "According to a report in the Miami Herald, 'Chancellor Angela Merkel has called President Barack Obama after receiving information that U.S. intelligence may have targeted her mobile phone. Merkel spokesman Steffen Seibert said Merkel made clear in Wednesday's call that "she views such practices, if the indications are confirmed ... as completely unacceptable" and called for U.S. authorities to clarify the extent of surveillance in Germany.' Der Spiegel has some information on Germany's own "PRISM" project. White House spokesman Jay Carney said President Obama 'assured the chancellor that the United States is not monitoring and will not monitor' her communications. He didn't mention anything about past communications. This news follows allegations of U.S. surveillance of the Presidents of Mexico, and France. Yesterday the LA Times noted, 'French authorities are shocked — shocked — to learn that the American government is spying on French citizens. The Foreign Ministry summoned the U.S. ambassador to the Quai D'Orsay to inform him that what's going on is "unacceptable," and President Francois Hollande claimed to have issued a stern rebuke to President Obama in a phone conversation.' Up until now, Merkel had been reluctant to say anything bad about the U.S. over the NSA leaks."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Germany: We Think NSA May Have Tapped Chancellor Merkel's Cell Phone

Comments Filter:
  • The sad thing is... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by jdbuz (962721) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @05:49PM (#45217831)
    that Obama probably doesn't know either way.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @05:57PM (#45217915)

      Actually, just like how bin Laden supposedly communicates through his blinking in his videos, Obama and Clapper probably set up something similar for their covert communication based on how Clapper rubs his face when he's lying.

    • by FudRucker (866063) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:30PM (#45218235)
      obama is a puppet, he is owned by his handlers (military/industrial complex & wallstreet & federal reserve) and he does exactly what they want him to do
      • by amicusNYCL (1538833) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:58PM (#45218477)

        obama is a puppet, he is owned by his handlers (military/industrial complex & wallstreet & federal reserve) and he does exactly what they want him to do

        This is probably what he has the most in common with previous presidents. I'm sure that when he got into office after promising to repeal or reform the patriot act, the NSA and other people sat him down and told him the way it is, and that was that.

        • by Hatta (162192) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @07:57PM (#45219007) Journal

          He never would have gotten into office without playing ball with the elites.

        • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @08:08PM (#45219099)

          Don't be silly. Any politician strong enough to have a shot at the presidency knows how the game they played their whole life works. They help a select few companies, the companies throw them some crumbs. The candidate is happy because he gets what he wants, the companies are happy because the status quo is left unchanged, and the public is happy because they know THIS TIME things will be different.

        • by phantomfive (622387) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @08:29PM (#45219269) Journal

          I'm sure that when he got into office after promising to repeal or reform the patriot act, the NSA and other people sat him down and told him the way it is, and that was that.

          He voted in favor of wiretapping shortly before getting elected. If you thought he was going to repeal it, you were naive. He indicated clearly what he was going to do, and you should have known beforehand what you were getting.

          I'm not saying McCain would have been better but you shouldn't fool yourself.

      • by cold fjord (826450) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @09:11PM (#45219545)

        obama is a puppet, he is owned by his handlers (military/industrial complex & wallstreet & federal reserve) and he does exactly what they want him to do

        So, you are thinking that they wanted:

        - The sequester to cut $50 billion per year out of the defense budget? (With the MIC already down to 4-5% of GDP from 9.3% in 1962? [heritage.org])
        - Massive new financial regulations on loans, consumer credit, and much increased Federal government oversight?
        - Massive increases to Federal regulations across most sectors of the economy which raise the cost of business and threaten uncertainty?
        - The Obamacare debacle?

        You think they seek their own weakening or destruction? I think you haven't thought that through all the way.
         

        • What massive regulation do you mean? I am just an outside observer but my impression was that compared to most places the US barely restricted the financial sector at all since the 2008 debacle. These people were gambling with other people's money, taking outrageous risks, crafting "products" which nobody really understood -- taking the profits such as they were and leaving the losses for society. Yet these practices continue much the same. No one was prosecuted and bonuses for execs have continued to be en

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by FriendlyLurker (50431)

          (With the MIC already down to 4-5% of GDP from 9.3% in 1962? [heritage.org])

          Defense spending has in no way been trending down, as your dishonestly trying to imply by comparing to GDP (yet again - like you have an agenda?) [slashdot.org]). I would draw your eye to the incredible graphic here [sipri.org] from the well regarded Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Just shy of an eye popping 700billion/year military spending by the US. Certainly off its historic highs during the good times high rolling 2008, but even the military could not live it up like it is pre-2008. Far more credible than you

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      "The president assured the chancellor that the United States is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor"

      You see, we're only storing a copy of the communications [I]in case[/I] we need to go back and listen to them at some future date. Germany is acting like we have someone actively listening to her phone calls. C'mon, we're the USA; we don't listen to anyone! I don't understand why the Chancellor is so upset.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The sad thing is Obama doesn't know sh*t from shine-ola. He's shat and fallen back into it, wallowing in it like a mudwog (see Bode').
      He seems to like it, had developed gills for it and stays under longer and longer. Good Job Democrats! You reached up your nose and picked a winner! Twice!
      Our lives look soooo much brighter now. What're you Repubtards giggling about? Like you ever did any better in your lifetime! Morons, I'm surrounded by self destructive MORONS!

    • by ImOuttaHere (2996813) on Thursday October 24, 2013 @05:09AM (#45221329)

      Oh, Obama knows.

      What maybe Americans don't yet realize is why this such a huge deal here in Europe, and why, in particular, Germany was "OK" with the whole NSA spying scandal, at first.

      It turns out that a rather large trade deal between Europe and US was in process when the NSA spying scandal broke. The Germans had the trade pact right where they wanted it. The French did not. You perhaps noted the German hand waving that they were outraged by the NSA spying, but really weren't going to do anything to torpedo the trade deal. The French, OTOH, were prepared to back completely out.

      Now it seems that the Germans found something they clearly do not like.

      Think "leverage." Each country is looking for more favorable terms with the Americans.

      that Obama probably doesn't know either way.

  • Shocking (Score:5, Funny)

    by OglinTatas (710589) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @05:50PM (#45217847)

    I am shocked. Shocked! That a country--any country--would spy on a foreign head of state.
    What a world we live in

    • Re:Shocking (Score:5, Informative)

      by cold fjord (826450) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @05:57PM (#45217911)

      I am shocked. Shocked! That a country--any country--would spy on a foreign head of state.
      What a world we live in

      As long as you are "shocked, shocked," in this manner [youtube.com], you are correct.

      NSA, France and spy wars [latimes.com]

      Naturally, the French would be outraged. What government would be happy to learn that a close ally was secretly monitoring its people? Then again, it was revealed in 2010 that France conducts its own espionage activities here on U.S. soil. What's more, French officials have been aware of the NSA program in France for months. Oh, and also, France's intelligence agencies have established an electronic surveillance system of their own that monitors their citizens' phone conversations, emails, texts and even their Twitter posts.

    • Re:Shocking (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Murvel (2924285) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @05:59PM (#45217945)
      Yeah, that sarcasm came trough! But this is so unbelievably clumsy, and at a time where the situation is already quite tense. They took a gamble to begin with, setting up wires all over the European parliament but targeting the head of state of one of the US closest allies. Mind boggling, but then that is probably only a part of the picture. A very nonsensical one at that.
      • Re:Shocking (Score:5, Interesting)

        by gweihir (88907) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:33PM (#45218259)

        I think the NSA has has/had completely lost sight of the most important thing in politics: Don't piss off your friends. You are going to need them. Instead they hacked, sabotaged security and listened in wherever they found it possible. This also means there was no oversight of any kind that was in the least bit effective.

        Quite frankly, the NSA is now basically a serious problem, and not part of any solution anymore. And that the the US administration proved this incompetent at controlling the NSA or may even have been cheering it on (as Rice reportedly did) has lost the US a tremendous amount of goodwill. Those that claimed the US administration is an amoral monster that does not understand the concept of "friend" seemed like crackpots before. Now it looks more and more that they might have had a point. Not good at all. The modern world needs team-players. Even a player as big as the US will eventually be left behind if they cannot manage that.

        • Sorry, but when exactly NSA was part of the solution?

        • Team players? lol...you have an extremely naive view of how the world actually works. Everyone spies on everyone, regardless of what team they are on. The only difference here is that the NSA got caught courtesy of a traitor named Ed Snowden. In fact, I'm guessing he will go down in history as the greatest traitor this nation has ever seen.

    • Re:Shocking (Score:4, Insightful)

      by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojo@NOspaM.world3.net> on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:01PM (#45217985) Homepage

      Actually it is considered unacceptable for allies to spy on each other's heads of state. Countries are not supposed to treat their friends this way.

      On the subject of the French government's surprise, it isn't because French citizens are being spied on like the summary says. It is that there is mass surveillance of millions of French citizens by another friendly member of NATO.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        Actually it is considered unacceptable for allies to spy on each other's heads of state. Countries are not supposed to treat their friends this way.

        On the subject of the French government's surprise, it isn't because French citizens are being spied on like the summary says. It is that there is mass surveillance of millions of French citizens by another friendly member of NATO.

        Of course it's considered "unacceptable". Because the sheep (in this case, tech nerds) just love to lap up the righteous indignation of having their privacy violated, while simultaneously thinking wikileaks is the greatest thing ever (you know, the organization headed by the guy which decided there wasn't too much danger disclosing the names of allied informants in warzones in Afgahnistan and Iraq).

        Meanwhile, anyone who can do it is doing it and those who can't are trying to.

        • wow, just wow. you sure are blind.

          'we' are happy about wikileaks since the balance of power was HIGHLY unbalanced. those who had privacy (at the top) were abusing it and causing real world-wide harm. shining sunlight on those who are definitely doing bad things is a Good Thing(tm).

          you can't see that? or you are just trolling? I can't quite tell.

      • I hope the NSA continues to piss off the wrong people.

        us little guys have no say in things anymore, but maybe if they ruffle enough big feathers, things will change.

        (nah, they won't change. who am I kidding?)

    • Re:Shocking (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Desler (1608317) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:20PM (#45218143)

      So you wouldn't mind one of your friends tapping your phones?

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by bitt3n (941736)
        I wouldn't mind tapping one of my friends...
      • So you wouldn't mind one of your friends tapping your phones?

        If your spouse does it, you what, fire them?

        Welcome to the complex world of diplomacy.

    • Re:Shocking (Score:5, Insightful)

      by H0p313ss (811249) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:20PM (#45218145)

      I am shocked. Shocked! That a country--any country--would spy on a foreign head of state.
      What a world we live in

      Exactly, this whole thing has been standard practice for decades.

      But now that the man on the street knows your elected officials can play it for political points without being the bad guy.

    • by gweihir (88907)

      Well, apparently Merkel had the same reaction. Which implies a huge deal of naivety, but now, fortunately, she seems to be pretty pissed. Maybe Germany will find something wrong with the NSA spying on its citizens after all...

      • by Torvac (691504)
        Sure suddenly she is pissed. after months of playing this down and going along with the US. And ofc the reason can't be that the EU parlaments position against the NSA spying (suspend SWIFT etc. ) was just published yesterday and she has to position herselfes with the EU now. despicable politicians and their shitty games, really fuck her.
    • Re:Shocking (Score:5, Interesting)

      by echnaton192 (1118591) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:59PM (#45218491)

      The point you are all missing is that our intelligence service actually does not do that on allies. They have turned a blind eye to US activities in Germany and profited from the results, but try to understand that such spying activity you implicitly accuse German intelligence services is absolutely unthinkable.

      That is not naivity from a German citizen, it is a complete misunderstanding about how my country ticks. We have a disgusting Government, just as you do. We have too uncontrolled intelligence agencies. We have some poverty.

      But it is not comparable to your country. Our governments tried to be accepted back into the international community by behaving... better... than ever before since WW II. Another war is one of the greatest fears in my country. Kosovo was one thing, because it reminded people of our past. But even for Afghanistan, the chancellor had to threat the bundestag to resign if they did not vote for "unrestricted solidarity" with america. Not because the majority forgot what America has done for us, but because the fear of war has been implemented in the german conscious.

      This is a really narrow description and there may be some Germans here describing other or contrary views, and they are valid. But this is not my mothers tongue, so I'll have to simplify a lot.

      My point is: You really misunderstood the Germans if you accuse us of spying on our best allies. One does not do that as a good ally, so it would have been conpletely out of the question. No BND buerocrat or MAD soldier would dare to do that, because there would be some serious consequences like losing the job or at least let their career come to a full stop.

      I know this sounds crazy to you, but even though I am a strong opponent to every party currently in the Bundestag, you should really try to understand the world better. The outrage is funded, but of course I disagree with the government about the real scandal.

      The real scandal fo my government lies in the complete ignorance of "Mutti" when the information about mass surveillance on us all leaked (which is forbidden for our agencies, so they let yours do the job but did not publicly aknowledged the scale ogüf the programs, maybe even actuelly underestimated them). Mutti is outraged because she was spied upon. She did not even raise a finger against the mass surveillance on every German citizen.

      My government is bad. But to campare their doings to the atrocities your governemnt did in recent years is unfounded. You still have the nobel prize in the western world for behaving like complete assholes. No, not every country is doing those things. Most of our intelligence agencies are boring beyond belief. And stupid. And blind on the right eye so they let the nazis kill "non-aryans" again, which is a scandal even if the numbers of our nazis today are comparable to other countries.

      But mass-surveillance? On a smaller scale and I am talking about per cent, not absolute numbers. And spying on an american embassy or wiretaping members of the american government? You got to be kidding me. You really have no clue. UNTHINKABLE.

      Again: This is no full scale political analysis of our politics, it is a very simple description on what is happening here.

      And if I were you I would ask myself if it is in the best interest of my country to piss off every ally in the world and at the same time forcing us to boycott american service providers. Do you think I am the only one that is doing the shift away from every cloud remotely american and from any closed source product stemming from american companies? The suisse and SOME German providers are trustworthy. All american dataproducts must be considered to be compromised.

      Defend the NSA activities all day long. You are entitled to. But honestly: Do you see me using Windows outside of a very strictly secured vm on a linux machine a year from now? Gaming kept me on windows, but the security risks exposed are too big. I might trust steam on a linux machine enough to let it run while I am playin

      • Re:Shocking (Score:5, Insightful)

        by mwehle (2491950) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @07:32PM (#45218777) Homepage
        Yours is a more lengthy and more thoughtful response than usually found on Slashdot. Unfortunately many American Slashdot readers, as Americans everywhere, have very little context from which to view our government's activities, hence the automatic and unfounded reaction that "everybody does it." There's a hubris here that is hard to communicate - an assumption of the US being first among bullies. I flew back to the US from Berlin in August and before getting through customs was already being harangued by officials who treated passengers as if we were prisoners, or cattle, a contrast to the politeness I'd been treated with in Germany. My impression is that many Americans don't see the NSA and other "public servants" as civil servants at all, but rather as hired guns of a sort, who for the best reasons "step outside the law" like innumerable rogue television cops.
      • by rve (4436)

        I think your mistake is assuming the likes of Germany and France are allies of the US.

        There was never a relationship approaching equality, nor particularly close cultural ties like with the English speaking countries, just at one time a common enemy. With the disappearance of the Warsaw pact and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Germany's location isn't as strategic anymore, and since the Europeans have lost their ability to project military power overseas, they currently are of little strategic use to t

  • I am shocked that they are shocked.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Not so different from Russia and China, now are we.

    • by gweihir (88907)

      More effective at evil, but whether that is an advantage is a good question...

  • by number17 (952777) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @05:58PM (#45217931)
    I don't think they asked the right question or got the correct response. The fact that the United States isn't monitoring her does not mean that the private company Booz Allen Hamilton isn't.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:21PM (#45218151)

      Perhaps this is why Huawei equipment was banned, it didn't have the right backdoors for the NSA to monitor everything and they were unable to force the company to put them in.

      THAT is probably the real security threat, the NSA could not spy as effectively.

      • by HiThere (15173)

        Others have reported that the quality of the software was such that no backdoors would be needed. I haven't examined the equipment myself, so I don't know, but don't let your paranoia lead you to make foolish decisions. The NSA having a backdoor is one thing. Every cracker who feels like it having a backdoor is something a bit worse.

        • by MRe_nl (306212)

          Others have reported that the software was simply a copy of other software, which already had back-doors.

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

          Their high end network hardware is at least as good as Cisco's, although I can't comment on their consumer grade stuff. Either way it's a choice between NSA backdoors or Chinese government backdoors.

  • by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @05:59PM (#45217943) Homepage Journal

    - Do you use electronics to communicate?

    - Do you live on Earth?

    If you answered "yes" to either of these questions, then you can assume that yes, the NSA is monitoring you.

    • by Cyfun (667564)

      Hell, the "Earth" thing probably doesn't even apply as I'd be willing to bet they have access to NASA's radio transmissions, too. After all, their acronyms are only one letter apart.

  • Don't get caught (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:00PM (#45217959)

    Call it what you want, when close allies catch you spying on their head of state, you're handing them a bag of bargaining chips.

  • by Megahard (1053072) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:07PM (#45218015)

    When GWB gave her a backrub, he must have been secretly planting a bug.

  • These governments have all known about this spying for a long time (as has anyone who reads the news carefully). Maybe they feel the need to pretend to be surprised, but I wonder what the real understanding between governments is. When is it ok? How much is too much? What are the lines?

    • by gweihir (88907) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:38PM (#45218299)

      The head of state of a friendly government is completely off-limits for spying. That is only permissible for enemies and even there highly problematic as it can be considered an act of war. Those responsible in the NSA must have lost their minds completely and worked themselves into a mind-set where everybody is the enemy. There also cannot have been any oversight that deserves the name.

      • by scoticus (1303689) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @10:41PM (#45220011)

        Those responsible in the NSA must have lost their minds completely and worked themselves into a mind-set where everybody is the enemy.

        Yep. Everyone IS our enemy. We have completely lost our post-WWII advantage of being the only industrial power worth a damn. The world is catching up. If we want to maintain our "exceptionalism", we must consider every last nation a competitor. This means treating even our friends as rivals. It's pretty fucking stupid, but there it is.

      • The head of state of a friendly government is completely off-limits for spying.

        why? WHY??

        why would she get more rights to privacy than I would?

        I object to that! as any self-respecting free person would. ...not that my objection is worth the electrons its printed on.

        • by gl4ss (559668)

          Spying on pretty much everyone is illegal by the laws of the countries they(targets) are in.

          I think the only way to stop the madness is to find out the actual people doing the spying and bring them lawful consequences in the countries the spying was done in. that would make people think twice about working for nsa(and equivalents in other countries), since it could lead to them being unable(or seriously limited) to travel internationally(due to having interpol arrest requests on their heads).

          Easiest way to

      • by guanxi (216397)

        The head of state of a friendly government is completely off-limits for spying.

        Is that your opinion about right and wrong, or are you answer the question of 'what are the unspoken rules of international espionage'? If the latter, what is that based on?

  • So what ? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Yoda222 (943886) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:21PM (#45218157)
    What's the reccurent argument that we hear from politics, probably including A. Merket or at least some CDU/CSU people ? Something like "If you've got nothing to hide, you've got nothing to fear." Does she has something to hide ?
    • by gweihir (88907)

      Judging from the history of CDU/CSU chancelors, presidents and other high-ranking politicians: Oh, yes! She will have a lot of things to hide, including things that would cost her her office and maybe things that would have worse consequences if they ever came to light. Not that the SPD politicians are that much better...

      BTW. it is "Merkel".

  • it is now obvious (Score:5, Insightful)

    by FudRucker (866063) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @06:27PM (#45218203)
    that the NSA is not doing all this spying for looking for terrorists, it is espionage, they are wanting to steal data for their fascist criminal friends that run the military/industrial complex (private sector) for profits, it is basically theft of various sorts (whatever they can get their greedy hands on)
    • by argStyopa (232550)

      Or they're performing the BASIC function of an elint organization, that is, gathering any and all intelligence on other states that they can or possible threats to the US.

      You *do* know that the US has military plans for fighting any country in the world, including our friends, right?

      This is for-keeps geopolitics. This is not playground tiddlywinks.

  • Time to switch to BlackBerry!
    • I accidentally put the batteries in backwards and now it turned into a whiteberry.

      its quite secure, now. so secure, it won't even power on anymore!

  • by FudRucker (866063) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @07:02PM (#45218507)
    the governments are above the law, they can do whatever the hell they want to do, until a force bigger than them kicks their ass and says otherwise, it has been that way throughout history and thats the way it always will be
  • by themushroom (197365) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @07:11PM (#45218589) Homepage

    President Obama 'assured the chancellor that the United States is not monitoring and will not monitor' her communications.

    The NSA had informed him that she was going to ask him if she was being monitored.

  • NSA (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mfh (56) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @07:16PM (#45218637) Journal

    Let's take it one step further and identify the REAL PROBLEM.

    The NSA isn't saying they want to have all information to be free and accessible to everyone uniformly -- they are saying they want to have it forever for their own purposes (whatever those might be).

    But when Snowden does the same exact thing as the NSA -- according to them he must be punished as a traitor.

    Laws are not therefore uniform. They apply only to some... and when that is happening there is no society. There is only the law of the insect colony and a fat queen riding the heap.

    • > Laws are not therefore uniform. They apply only to some...

      Sorry, but...
      can't resist, to say...

      NO SHIT Sherlock.

    • Laws are not therefore uniform.

      Yeah, specifically, laws in the US don't apply to chancellors in Germany. I know, it's a hard concept.

    • by HiThere (15173)

      I think you don't understand insect colonies very well. Just because one particular insect is called the Queen, doesn't mean she has any control. Generally she has less control than do the workers, even at an individual level.

      Of course, you *could* be asserting this about the heads of state, but it didn't sound like it.

    • the bond of trust is broken. its painfully obvious that rules don't apply to those in power. therefore, the rules are void. feel free to follow your concience and break any laws you want.

      welcome to the brave new world. maybe world 2.0 will be a better one. maybe.

  • If it wasn't for that other guy, I would never have even thought about tapping your phone. But since he build the framework that allowed me to do it, of course I did it.

  • In a surprise move, it was discovered that the NSA has secretly been moonlighting by outsourcing its collection abilities to third-parties, including foreign governments.

    "It's a natural fit," said James Clapper, embattled NSA chief. "We spend billions of dollars yearly on collection, computation, storage, and analysis. By leveraging these investments, we provided intel capabilities to foreign governments at a fraction of their retail cost - and at a significant profit." Intelligence analysts pointed out tha

    • "In a surprise move, it was discovered that the NSA has secretly been moonlighting by selling its collection results to third-parties, including foreign governments"?
      And yes, but not for cash. Tit for tat. Echelon, Gladio, Five Eyes et al, these are all joint exercises. Everybody is in on it. The only difference at the moment is the NSA got hit by a string of defectors. My analysis would be that it's almost unavoidable once your team get's too big, unless everybody is motivated by a shared powerful ideology

  • by Coditor (2849497) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @08:07PM (#45219087)
    ...and not mention what kind of phone it is? The people who want to argue want to know.
  • Can anyone honestly believe the the US isn't spying or trying to spy on them? Countries will spy to try to get a strategic or tactical advantage ... that is what they do, some better than others, the US better than most.

    • by sydneyfong (410107) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @11:41PM (#45220347) Homepage Journal

      Way to justify everything with a sentence.

      Can anyone honestly believe [accused] isn't [doing something wrong]? People will [do bad things] to try to get a strategic or tactical advantage .... that is what they do, some better than others, [accused] better than most.

      Let's try a few examples.

      Can anyone honestly believe Enron wasn't cooking the books? Companies will falsify financial information to try to push up their stock price ... that is what they do, some better than others, Enron better than most.

      Can anyone honestly believe men aren't out there to rape women? Humans will use force to try to get a strategic or tactical evolutionary advantage. That is what they do, some better than others, this rapist better than most.

  • President Francois Hollande claimed to have issued a stern rebuke to President Obama in a phone conversation with his wife

    FTFY

  • They "may have" being listening to Merkel communication? I admire the journalist that was able to keep it to the fact, and retained being too much affirmative, but I would be very surprised if NSA did not listen to Merkel (and all other EU leaders) communications.

    I wonder if they managed to monitor Putin, though.

  • by edibobb (113989) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @09:59PM (#45219793) Homepage
    If the President ordered the NSA to stop spying on U.S. Citizens, Germany, France, Japan, the U.K., and Australia, would the NSA obey? I think not. They are completely out of control, above (or below) the law and the U.S. Constitution.
    • by AHuxley (892839)
      The political leaders become addicted to the intel per election/generation. The US/UK has had this global insight for their top staff for a while. The GCHQ/NSA just keeps on collecting and the cleared political leaders just keep on reading the files they are given.
  • by geekymachoman (1261484) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @11:18PM (#45220211)

    I feel disgusted every time top politicians plead ignorance about what other countries top politicians/owners are doing. They all in bed and these kinds of news are just a circus for the hungry.

    NSA can tap phones beds bathrooms of every each one of European politicians and 5 years later, the EU ones are still gonna down the planes of let's say South American presidents if US gives them a call about it.

    That's how the real truth comes out. Everything else is BS and especially this Merkel.

    But people love it. There are some, don't like it... don't like the circus.. but most of the people do. It fills their empty lives with low quality content on which they comment and give their opinions, exercise their freedom of speech. Me ? I'm just hangover and talking sh.t.

  • This just in....spies suspected of spying. More on this breaking story at 11.

  • If this really happened, it's a German security FAIL. A nation like Germany should be able to secure the communications of the head of state. If the NSA isn't trying to tap her phone you can be assured that the Chinese and the Russians are trying.

    I've got no issue with the NSA going after foreign governments. My issue with the NSA is that they are turning this nation-level spying apparatus on regular citizens.

  • ... when all 80 Million Germans were under surveillance, everything seemed to be OK ... political leaders said everything was fine, all questions had been answered, go back to your everyday life ... (mainly because German BND most likely was completely involved, also) But now all of a sudden they are p*ssed because they may have been a target ... sorry, but _I_ am also concerned about _MY_ privacy ... why do you believe you are better than anybody else of the 80 million citizens? After all, _YOU_ are also a

  • by ruir (2709173)
    you tell me mobster have encrypted lines and software for talking, and head of states just talk about sensitive matters over the phone like us, common people?

Save yourself! Reboot in 5 seconds!

Working...