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Is China Wiring Africa For Surveillance? 196

Posted by samzenpus
from the I-see-you dept.
Daniel_Stuckey writes "Huawei has invested billions of dollars in Africa over the last two decades, providing affordable cell phones, internet access, and telecommunications networks to the continent. Over the last few months Huawei has closed major deals in Africa to get more areas on the grid. The company says it's bridging the digital divide, but others suspect it's wiring the continent for surveillance."
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Is China Wiring Africa For Surveillance?

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  • Exfiltrate Africa? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Shavano (2541114)
    I guess if it comes for free, that's one thing, but how much money do you think China wants to invest exfiltrating data from Africa as opposed to their first-world competitors?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:28AM (#44453895)
      I think you just wanted an excuse to use the mostly unknown word "exfiltrate." Your post doesn't actually say anything at all.....
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by TheRaven64 (641858)
        Exfiltrate isn't a very uncommon word in computer security. The grandparent's post, however, was largely meaningless. More of a 'hey, I've just learned a new word, now I am going to use it in a sentence' sort of thing.
      • by Shavano (2541114)

        Did you have something intelligent to add to the conversation? If you did, you forgot to include it in your comment.

        In my case, I was assuming that my audience was intelligent enough to pick up my inference. Clearly such assumptions aren't justified on Slashdot, as you illustrated.

        So let me spell it out for you: I think Huawei is investing in Africa because they see it as a place where they can sell equipment and make a profit. There's no need to look for ulterior motives behind everything they do jus

    • by interkin3tic (1469267) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:35AM (#44453927)
      The NSA, facebook, and google seem to demonstrate that spying on everyone requires shockingly little investment and gets good returns even when you don't know exactly what you want to find in your spying.

      Plus, there seem to be a lot of stuff that is worth knowing. There's oil and other natural resources in Africa, right? Seems like intercepting geological reports within western companies, or whoever, about where the oil might be could be very advantageous to China.
      • by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 02, 2013 @02:02AM (#44453999)

        As an Australian in the Oil&Gas (and previously the mining) industry, the main reason Australia's economy is so big right now is because it's more expensive and dangerous to rip the shit outta Africa and Brazil.

        Once China (the biggest importer of iron by a long way) nail that down, I'll need to expatriate or be out of a job. Providing digital-age tools and infrastructure to Africa is an incredibly smart move for China.

        • by c0lo (1497653)

          ...I'll need to expatriate or be out of a job. Providing digital-age tools and infrastructure to Africa is an incredibly smart move for China.

          See? You already know where to apply for immigration (I bet the NBN is going to take longer to build).

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        dunno.. you could wire up 20% of africa for gratis with the NSA budget.

        • by c0lo (1497653) on Friday August 02, 2013 @02:47AM (#44454131)

          dunno.. you could wire up 20% of africa for gratis with the NSA budget.

          Not going to happen, it wouldn't help a bit the US defence industry.

          • by Rockoon (1252108)
            Strange that you continue to think that the NSA is beholden to the defense industry.
            • by c0lo (1497653)

              Strange that you continue to think that the NSA is beholden to the defense industry.

              Strange how you don't see how an altruistic gesture (wire 20% of africa) would lead to less tension thus less business opportunity (aka conflict and fear) for the so called "defense" industry.

      • by Camael (1048726) on Friday August 02, 2013 @03:49AM (#44454377)

        Natural resources is the name of the game. [japantimes.co.jp] And its not just China eyeing the riches.

        One of the more geographically remote locations was Africa, where Japan and China, and to a growing extent South Korea and India, are in fierce competition to win contracts for energy and mineral rights on the continent.

        Africa’s allure is easy to understand. Libya ranks ninth in world oil reserves, Nigeria 10th and Angola 16th. For natural gas reserves, Nigeria ranks eighth, Algeria ninth and Egypt 15th.

        In addition, Africa holds 95.5 percent of the world’s platinum reserves, 58.3 percent of all diamonds, 49.2 percent of all cobalt, 45.8 percent of the chromium supply and 27.1 percent of the world’s manganese.

      • The NSA, facebook, and google seem to demonstrate that spying on everyone requires shockingly little investment and gets good returns even when you don't know exactly what you want to find in your spying.

        The NSA can do it cheaply because of the existence of companies like Google and Facebook that have centralised systems that a lot of people trust. Google and Facebook only exist because of various economic incentives in the US (some resulting from government incentives, some due to historical accidents), which are not exactly cheap - trying to replicate these conditions in another country would be very expensive. If people were using decentralised communication systems, PRISM would have been a lot harder.

    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:41AM (#44453955) Journal

      I guess if it comes for free, that's one thing, but how much money do you think China wants to invest exfiltrating data from Africa as opposed to their first-world competitors?

      Right. Because first-world companies don't do any business in Africa.

      Alternatively, China is investing in Africa for the long haul, because China desperately wants access to Africa's vast natural resources. Many African Governments include infrastructure projects as a requirement for Chinese acquisitions or in trade deals with China.

      • by icebike (68054) on Friday August 02, 2013 @02:41AM (#44454109)

        Maybe Huawei is finding itself shut out of western markets for fear of backdoors and stolen code, that the best market they can find is selling to their own government's aid programs.

        • by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 02, 2013 @03:34AM (#44454307)

          Huawei employee here (non-chinese, btw).

          Huawei is not being shut out of "western" markets, with the exception of the US. Huawei has an extensive deployment of radio, wireless access, packet switching and core systems across Europe and Latinamerica. A good portion of what 3G and LTE networks in both sides of the Atlantic for any operator you care to mention is using Huawei sytems.

          I must recognise, though, that laws and regulations (both in telecom proper and labour areas) make it easier for Huawei in african countries than they do elsewhere.

          Huawei is *not* a multinational company with its headquarters in China, it is a Chinese company with offices all over the world. Big difference. All decision-making is either done from China or by chinese PHBs abroad; and many of them can't seem to get that they are not in China (when in Europe, for instance) and they want to do things in their own way, which is proving to be easier in (some) african countries.

          IMO, yes, Huawei is wiring Africa for its own purposes...and that may involve surveillance.

          • Huawei employee here (non-chinese, btw).

            But you speak Chinese, right? It seems they always list that as a job requirement.

            • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

              by Anonymous Coward

              (me again)

              Nope. Except for "Ni Hao" (hello) which I hardly ever use...and a couple of other phonemes that I've learned.

              In fact, "they" seem to prefer it that way. In our office (somewhere in Europe) there's 3 lines of communication. One for, as we are called, "local staff" in our "local" language (not English); another one in English which is the crossover language; and Chinese, where all the things that we "locals" can't/don't participate....of course, we get upset and reciprocate by starting our own half

    • by Camael (1048726)

      I guess if it comes for free, that's one thing, but how much money do you think China wants to invest exfiltrating data from Africa as opposed to their first-world competitors?

      Why don't you ask the NSA? They could probably tell you.

  • by mveloso (325617) on Friday August 02, 2013 @12:33AM (#44453695)

    Nobody cares enough about Africa to listen in on them. The only thing Africa has is resources, and China already is buying them. Is the infrastructure subject to surveillance? Sure, but every infrastructure is, even heterogeneous ones like the US.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by buildslave (875173)

      Maybe their trying to protect their resources. There has been trouble at some of the Chinese run mines. If they had good surveillance maybe they could prevent some of the 'trouble' that they have had.

    • by AHuxley (892839) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:18AM (#44453855) Homepage Journal
      Resources need deals signed with local leaders. Smart local experts will chatter about the quality of the deal, some been more into nationalism and patriotism than any bribe can alter.
      They will do the math with the local press - the cost of a university, hospital, roads, new mines, power, rail vs the true long term total export value.
      Such experts and their press contacts need to be found and shown the error of their ways.
      Any African country doing huge deals with a France, UK, USA, Russia knows the part they have to play. Empty ships arrive, full ships depart, the local leadership is looked after and a few locals get jobs.
      You had South Africa, Cuba, East Germany all playing the aid/spy card too.
      Vietnam, China mostly went for long term farm aid and very long term friendship.
      The visions of Moscow, London and Washington have usually been the same, influence, shared mil bases, listening stations, blocking China/France/Japan.
      What can leaders in Africa do?
      Sell out to mines/oil backed by US banks and loans with a few nice people from MI6/CIA to ensure its stays good.
      Sell out to mines/oil backed by Russian loans with a few nice people from FSB/KGB to ensure its all good.
      Sell out to mines/oil backed by China with a lots of nice new experts, workers and useful infrastructure ensure its all good.
      Add in arms dealers, political and faith based groups who feel timber, oil, gems and strategic minerals are much better looked after in Paris, London, Washington.
      So you have a lot of groups who dont want the locals getting too vocal.
      • by moronoxyd (1000371) on Friday August 02, 2013 @04:37AM (#44454503)

        Resources need deals signed with local leaders. Smart local experts will chatter about the quality of the deal, some been more into nationalism and patriotism than any bribe can alter.

        So why is nobody suspecting surveillance when a US or European company is building communication infrastructure somewhere?
        They have exactly the same interest in knowing about this chatter as China.

        • So why is nobody suspecting surveillance when a US or European company is building communication infrastructure somewhere?

          Because both of these parties would end up using Chinese-made hardware / components. China is just cutting out the middle men.

        • by AHuxley (892839)
          Re: So why is nobody suspecting surveillance when a US or European company is building communication infrastructure somewhere?
          US hardware and software needs for telco support under http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_Assistance_For_Law_Enforcement_Act [wikipedia.org]
          Most of the telco kit from the EU/USA is loaded with police 'help' by default from the 1990's.
          Making things like this not too hard http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SISMI-Telecom_scandal [wikipedia.org]
        • by Luckyo (1726890)

          Suspect? They know it. No need to suspect. When you're a small country stuck in the middle of many evil empires who want to rob you as efficiently as possible, you know that every deal you sign comes with poison in the envelope.

          This moaning is about getting Western populace prepared for the propaganda of the next Cold War. You won't see too much crying about Chinese spying outside those territories. If anything, it's generally viewed as a good counterbalance to rampant one-sided Western action over last two

      • Resources need deals signed with local leaders. Smart local experts will chatter about the quality of the deal, some been more into nationalism and patriotism than any bribe can alter.

        [rest of comment truncated]

        From TFA: The company says it's bridging the digital divide, but others suspect it's wiring the continent for surveillance.

        What's amazing here is that all of Slashdot missed this false dichotomy, despite the sheer number of recent and timely articles underscoring that these two things aren't mutually exclusive. In fact, it seems they go hand in hand. Every government. Every government, has a vested in interest in keeping watch on its citizens. We have bitched and moaned about the NSA, but only because they had the indecency to get caught out by some punk kid. Not because it was surprising, shocking, o

    • by Black Parrot (19622) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:34AM (#44453925)

      Nobody cares enough about Africa to listen in on them.

      Even if you're right, it could be part of a longer-term strategy to insinuate themselves everywhere they can, with the prospect of future spread once established.

      Also... surely you're not suggesting that the NSF isn't listening in on Africa.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by cold fjord (826450)

      Nobody cares enough about Africa to listen in on them. The only thing Africa has is resources, and China already is buying them. Is the infrastructure subject to surveillance? Sure, but every infrastructure is, even heterogeneous ones like the US.

      So, nothing to see in Africa? Just move along? I don't think so.

      Just like Europe, South America, and Asia, Africa is an entire continent of nations, some of which have drawn considerable attention in the last couple of years. I assume you've heard of Libya? Egypt? Algeria? South Africa? There is a lot going on in Africa, and the Chinese are heavily involved. There are plenty of things they might want to listen to.

      Africa has more mobile phone users than the U.S. or E.U. [smartplanet.com]
      How mobile phones are making ca [theglobeandmail.com]

      • by AHuxley (892839) on Friday August 02, 2013 @02:03AM (#44454005) Homepage Journal
        China is doing nothing the old Colonial powers did not do Cold - just way more smart.
        The difference is China and Vietnam started long along in the 1960's with basic food aid, farming help, infrastructure and reaching out to the local postcolonial leadership.
        The West was very busy with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIA_activities_in_Africa [wikipedia.org]
        Africa can recall that part of their history, the small wars the US and Soviets played.
        Most in Africa recall the support for Apartheid (until the near end), the death of Patrice Lumumba, NGO's, missionaries, arms deals and endless easy US $ loans.
        China is working long term on its "cooperation ventures", real engineering, medical experts, roads for minerals, oil, gems, timber, food - not just arms deals, faith, more loans and super safe bank accounts.
      • by AK Marc (707885)

        South Africa Could Have a Spaceport

        Somalia and Kenya would be better places for a spaceport. More initial velocity. We should also be placing a space elevator there, better weather for it than South America.

    • Nobody cares enough about Africa to listen in on them. The only thing Africa has is resources, and China already is buying them. Is the infrastructure subject to surveillance? Sure, but every infrastructure is, even heterogeneous ones like the US.

      Resource deals are better facilitated if you can spy on the other side and listen to what they're holding out on and such. Makes sense for China to learn what the real price the seller wants versus what they negotiate for. If you know the other side is bluffing, it makes exploitation much easier.

      Second, if they become heavily invested in infrastructure, China's planning for the future. They know China won't be the cheap manufacturing base forever, and it will be Africa next. Well, those manufacturing bases need infrastructure, and what better way to spy on competitors than having the entire nation wired with your spy gear?

    • by mitcheli (894743)
      The belief that "nobody cares enough about Africa" would be a mistake. Africa has many developing technological sectors and many developing industries. Furthermore, Africa is poised to have one of the largest population explosions in modern history. As a result, there's a very good chance that Africa will be a much more significant player on the field in the decades to come. ... The entire US fits in the Horn of Africa. You really don't get an idea of how big Africa is until you try to fly across it. And wi
    • by mitcheli (894743)
      Keep in mind that a bulk of the Arab Spring happened in Northern Africa. As too did the Benghazi attack.
  • by beckett (27524)
    no.
  • "Hmm, government backdoor access to data through communications technology. Where would the NSA get an idea like that?"

    Talk about throwing rocks in glass houses!

    • by c0lo (1497653)

      "Hmm, government backdoor access to data through communications technology. Where would the NSA get an idea like that?"

      Talk about throwing rocks in glass houses!

      And a powerful throw, come to that. TFA:

      Each time the company [Huawei] has denied the allegations, and government investigations consistently fail to turn up any hard evidence.

      So, NSA would have the technical ability and all the interest in the world to demonstrate it.
      As they didn't, I suspect that the only "rational" explanation is they got sidetracked into... ummm... Of course, the very hypothesis that's nothing to be found in the first place is preposterous, the US govt told us so! As they also told us they're not spying on us... yea, well... spying just a little but for our own good... 'Cause, you see, sucking Africa dry of their preci

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 02, 2013 @12:39AM (#44453711)

    China is the greatest enemy of the USA, and ALL major US military planning is designed for future conflict between these two powers. So, no surprise then that the owners of Slashdot ensure a constant stream of articles attacking China. Attack Iran, attack China, praise Israel. Is there anyone here so thick that they do not notice this tedious pattern?

    PS do the owners of Slashdot still prevent citizens of Iran from accessing the open-source websites they also control. And NO, there is no US law requiring this.

    • Minor nitpick - China is arguably USAs greatest identifiable "enemy" (perhaps threat or rival is a better term here). The terrorists are probably a bigger threat. Heck, they do a pretty good job of screwing themselves over, who needs enemies?
    • ...do the owners of Slashdot still prevent citizens of Iran from accessing the open-source websites...

      That is truly disgusting [arabcrunch.com]!

    • by obarthelemy (160321) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:21AM (#44453877)
      I'd say the USA is the greatest enemy of the USA. If the madness don't stop soon, the 1% will have sucked the 99% so dry the USA will be a dessicated husk.
      • I'd say the USA is the greatest enemy of the USA. If the madness don't stop soon, the 1% will have sucked the 99% so dry the USA will be a dessicated husk.

        Maybe China is planning ahead for when that 1% discard that husk and move on to Africa.

      • Not to mention that the US managed to piss off the rest of the world enough that as soon as (not if, not even when) the collapse comes, few will come for a "US aid" but rather breath a sigh of relief. Yes, even and especially the countries that now suck up to it, pretending to be a buddy.

        Think of the school bully getting expelled. Even his lackeys are usually finally happy that he's gone.

  • by clovis (4684) * on Friday August 02, 2013 @12:59AM (#44453769)

    It's about time somebody started spying on Africa.
    Everytime they have a TV show about Africa, it's just a bunch of f**king lions and elephants. Where are all the people?
    What the heck's going on there? It's about time somebody found out.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Lots of warlords fighting over control of petty amounts of land, cannibalism, rape, starvation, poverty, AIDS, UN forces having sex with children, slaves,.... Not that all of Africa is like that, of course, but if anything needs to be on TV, it's that.
    • Everytime they have a TV show about Africa, it's just a bunch of f**king lions and elephants. Where are all the people?
      What the heck's going on there? It's about time somebody found out.

      That was then [youtube.com], this is now [youtube.com].

      You forgot to tell people to stay off your veldt.

    • by kcelery (410487)

      commander: "agent A, can you hear anything?"
      agent A: "Loud and clear."
      commander: "What is the message?"
      agent A: "wah ding du boo boo ju."
      commander: "What does that mean?"
      agent A: "Some kind of African language, I guess. How would I know?"

    • The burgeoning population is stripping the lands and forests of everything that can be eaten.
      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        The burgeoning population is stripping the lands and forests of everything that can be eaten.

        Or burned.

        This is the history of humanity. It's been suggested that europe would be desert today if not for the black plague putting a hitch in human activity. Take a look at the fertile crescent and tell me how fertile it is.

  • by stungod (137601) <scott&globalspynetwork,com> on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:04AM (#44453779) Homepage Journal

    About 4 years ago, I took a trip to Ethiopia. One guy I talked to there was the head of an aid organization that helped build infrastructure in the more rural parts of the country. He explained to me that while the Western countries like the US, Germany, the UK, etc donated money to local organizations, the Chinese preferred to come in and do the job themselves. It saves on the corruption and waste, and they get to build a positive impression themselves. So you see lots of Chinese companies there building roads, burying cable, building farms/industry, etc.

    He told me they had the right idea. The Chinese are *investing* in Africa as opposed to donating to it. That's going to have a long-term impact on who has more influence in Africa. So yeah, they're going to build surveillance...they're building the infrastructure. If we wanted to stop them, we'd go start building too.

    • by rahvin112 (446269) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:32AM (#44453919)

      It's Chinese colonialism. They are doing EXACTLY what the Europeans did. Just like the Europeans the Africans will be happy to allow them until they realize none of the jobs are going to them and that the infrastructure is simply to facilitate resource exploitation, just like the Europeans.

    • Maybe, but from what I've heard, Africans much prefer western aids.
       
      Westerners just drop their pile of money on the Africans' door and tell the Africans to save themselves with it.
       
      Chinese on the other hand distributes/build the aids themselves with lots of strings attach (nothing evil, mind you, just enough to make sure that both the Chinese and Africians get their money's worth.)
       
      To the Africans, they see Chinese' policy as an intrusion.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        As a South African...

        Firstly we will take from whoever gives it. Our politicians whine about western politicians as much as they do about the Chinese. The Chinese typically care about business more than they do about politics which makes them easier to work with. Other than stopping the Dalai Lama from visiting our country I can't think of any other strings they've pulled publicly.

    • by Hentes (2461350)

      The Chinese are effectively colonising Africa. Probably for the best, Africans are simply incapable of governing themselves. With the Chinese, they will have jobs, food, water and order. A good deal for both of them. Not as good for us though, which is why the West should get off its lazy ass and start to recolonise the place. With multiple parties competing for them, the Africans could get better deals, and we wouldn't hand over the continent to China. But with all the liberals around it's quite hard to ge

  • It could be worse (Score:5, Insightful)

    by obarthelemy (160321) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:19AM (#44453863)
    They could be propping up regimes that routinely use torture and abuse human rights, and randomly killing innocents with drones. But then there'd be nothing left for the US to do...
    • by TubeSteak (669689)

      Spoiler Alert: China does trade with regimes that routinely use torture and abuse human rights.
      Unlike western countries, China doesn't even make better governance (or even a basic accounting of funds) a condition of its loans.

      More often than not, China gives loans and asks for repayment in natural resources, which allows [government] and its cronies to turn the country's natural resources into cash + infrastructure.

      • by dkf (304284)

        Spoiler Alert: China does trade with regimes that routinely use torture and abuse human rights.

        China trades with everyone. Even the USA.

    • They could post whiny comments on Slashdot trying to make false equivalences to steer any and all discussions to the US rather than talking about the fact at hand!

      Seriously, quit with this shit. One of the most annoying things about Slashdot these days are the folks like you that just can't deal with any discussion that isn't about the US, in particular how bad the US is. It is a sort of arrogance that if the discussion isn't about something you know and care about, you can't deal with it and thus have to s

  • by Opportunist (166417) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:25AM (#44453885)

    ...China taking away jobs from the US.

    Dammit, spying on the world is OUR job! They took uuur juuuuubs!

    • ...China taking away jobs from the US.

      Dammit, spying on the world is OUR job! They took uuur juuuuubs!

      Not really, 'cause we were going to outsource them anyway.

      • Yeah, but they're supposed to work for US, not just cut out the middle man and fill their own intelligence pockets! That wasn't part of the deal!

  • by jma05 (897351) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:32AM (#44453911)

    Exactly why do we discuss articles like this? There is zero evidence so far that China is doing mass surveillance outside of China.

    The articles acknowledges it, and asks questions that cannot be answered, while providing no new insights.

    • by Fuzzums (250400)

      Extrapolate.

    • by TubeSteak (669689)

      Exactly why do we discuss articles like this? There is zero evidence so far that China is doing mass surveillance outside of China.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_Assistance_for_Law_Enforcement_Act [wikipedia.org]
      The US Government knows what we're doing, so they just assume the Chinese are doing the exact same thing.

      Don't forget that Huawei is the #1 manufacturer of telecom equipment as is considered one of the most *innovative companies in the world.
      The rest of the world knows Huawei for a lot more than "zomg China".

      *When they're not stealing technology from others.

      • by Rockoon (1252108)
        Blaming corporations, calling them "greedy," is silly and foolish. Its people that are "greedy."

        You can work in the American factory demanding that people buy over-priced products all you want, but consumers of products don't actually give a shit that you sit there making those demands. They don't "feel you" because they have their own problems, such as how to utilize the fruits of their own labors effectively.

        While you sit there being hostile towards business, friendly business environments are eating
  • by Fuzzums (250400) on Friday August 02, 2013 @01:36AM (#44453933) Homepage

    "but others suspect it's wiring the continent for surveillance".
    With todays knowledge: probably yes,
    Thanks again mr. Snowden for revealing the truth.

    Such a shame. It should have been NSA surveillance equipment, but they will find an other way.

  • Now that we know the US Gov. has our country (plus Europe at a min) completely wired up for surveillance who are we to complain about the Chinese.
  • by betterprimate (2679747) on Friday August 02, 2013 @03:10AM (#44454207)

    Africa is one of the largest supplier of Europe's natural resources. So much so that France sends out armed forces to procure them (they call the justification "terrorism" too, PR).

    Even still, most of their resources remain untapped. In the next two decades, a large focus is going to be around Algeria, Mauritania, Mali, and Niger as they are rich in untapped resources and exploitable in labor.

    Having an omnipresence would give an advantage to China as a global superpower. Not saying it's right or good...

  • No.

    Huawei is a company motivated by the desire to do business with people. There's nothing fishy about them trying to sell lots of your products to an emerging market.

    China almost certainly does have espionage interests in Africa, and Huawei equipment might be a vector. But I'm sure they're joined in that noble endeavour by the NSA, GCHQ, etc...

  • Rhetorical question is rhetorical.

  • by voss (52565) on Friday August 02, 2013 @03:49AM (#44454387)

    100. Finally, to keep my subjects permanently locked in a mindless trance, I will provide each of them with free unlimited Internet access.

    Well played China...well played...

  • Wiring for communications is the same as wiring for surveillance.

  • That all nations see the digitization of communication as a way to gain leverage over competitive fields in which they're participants People gotta talk and what they talk about and say is everything. So no surprises here. Everything is always an arms race and always will be until such time as 1) everyone has enough of everything 2) the innate jealousies, innate anti-social appetites , the innate urge to be alpha and have more than other people or hurt other people instead of just leaving them alone, are r

  • China has a VERY long memory & written history.

    Sun Tzu in the Art of War 2500 years ago said (paraphrazing from memory) "I would rather have one good spy than 10,000 good soldiers."

  • Carefully tracking elephants in their natural environment maybe they could figure out how they manage to become invisible in american's rooms.
  • As someone responsible to approve contracts between African govts. and one if the two major telecoms in China, I can tell you, yes, the country is being (has been since 2005) wired. The Chinese are following the Japanese model, where you build the communications infrastructure so you can know who is doing what logging, mineral and transportation work, etc., thereby providing your countries' vendors and early place in line with the local government when it's time to bid. It doesn't hurt to loan money to tho
  • I'd rather have the Chinese spy on my internet traffic than the US.
    Reaon: If I would have anything to hide (of course I don't :), being in western europe, I am better in physical reach of the US secret service than of the Chinese secret service. The Chinese knowing things about me affects me less.

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