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Congress Voting On Amendment to Defund NSA Domestic Spying Tomorrow 276

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the busy-signal dept.
New submitter Jah-Wren Ryel writes "It's been just over a month since the NSA's dragnet surveillance program was leaked to the public. Tomorrow, Congress is voting on an amendment that would block funding for NSA programs that collect the call records of innocent Americans. A win tomorrow may start a chain reaction — but it won't happen unless we speak up. We have one day to convince Congress to act." The EFF is urging U.S. citizens to call their representatives, noting that there is no time for email to be effective (find your representative). You can read the amendment on the EFF site, quoting the EFF: "Reps. Justin Amash, John Conyers, Jr., Thomas Massie, Mick Mulvaney, and Jared Polis are proposing an amendment that would curtail funding for the implementation of orders under Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act unless the order is explicitly limited in scope. ... Even as the Amash/Conyers Amendment is gaining momentum, some are rallying around a decoy amendment that would do nothing to rein in domestic surveillance. That amendment, championed by Rep. Nugent, would not alter in any way the government's use of Section 215 to obtain bulk communications records on millions of Americans. EFF is urging Representatives to oppose the Nugent Amendment."
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Congress Voting On Amendment to Defund NSA Domestic Spying Tomorrow

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  • I would, but... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by cphilo (768807) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:32PM (#44364921)
    I live in Kansas, so if I called my Congressman, it would be totally ineffective. I have tried before and gotten the form letter which says, basically, "If you have an opinion that disagrees with mine, Suck It." Sincerely Your Congressman
    • Re:I would, but... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by whoever57 (658626) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:47PM (#44365049) Journal

      I live in Kansas, so if I called my Congressman, it would be totally ineffective. I have tried before and gotten the form letter which says, basically, "If you have an opinion that disagrees with mine, Suck It." Sincerely Your Congressman

      You should still call. Express your disapproval if necessary. Silence will be interpreted as agreement.

      • Re:I would, but... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by trum4n (982031) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:51PM (#44365077)
        Disapproval will be interpreted as treason.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by cold fjord (826450)

          Disapproval will be interpreted as disapproval. It may be short sighted, ill considered, but still just disapproval.

          • Consider that if you call, the NSA will know you called. One more metadata tag in some disk drive in Utah.

            • So call from work from a conference room, no need to tie the record to yourself directly. Though I admit, I'm local so it's obviously not long distance for me.

              That said, shouldn't we mandate Congress have 800 numbers?
              • Re:I would, but... (Score:5, Informative)

                by postbigbang (761081) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:21PM (#44365417)

                Most orgs that have 800#s have ANI. Look it up-- like caller-id but more choice.

                Your cellphone put you in the conference room. You can be tracked easily to very confined geometry.

                So it was you. You don't even have to confess, we hacked the VoIP PBX long ago.

                • Last year I would have said you're tinfoil hat material.

                  However, I said 'directly', which isn't claiming they can't figure it out, just that it isn't straightforward from the meta-data.
                  • This is what hadoop is for.

                    • what? trample them with an elephant??

                      btw, even if they pass a new law or amendment, it won't do what we want it to do.

                      there is an outcry from the people (to some degree) but those in power know they want to keep this golden goose.

                      so, they'll make it seem like they've 'changed' but, in fact, it will be a facade. I would bet my entire savings account that this won't change the underlying behavior of the spy system. some veneer will be created to placate the masses, but business will continue as usual, just

                  • Re:I would, but... (Score:5, Insightful)

                    by Type44Q (1233630) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @05:06PM (#44365869)

                    Last year I would have said you're tinfoil hat material.

                    Fifteen years ago, you (and 95% of my fellow techies) would've said I was tinfoil hat material. (I may be a visionary but I'm fucking tired of being right.)

                    • Re:I would, but... (Score:5, Insightful)

                      by NFN_NLN (633283) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @05:21PM (#44365989)

                      Fifteen years ago, you (and 95% of my fellow techies) would've said I was tinfoil hat material. (I may be a visionary but I'm fucking tired of being right.)

                      There isn't much point fighting the natural cycle. Government gains too much power, becomes oppressive... people revolt... form new government... repeat.

                      I thought you could break the cycle but people literally have an animal instinct to be told what to do. When I was younger I thought people were naive, but even as I got older I heard educated adults say: "I'm not doing anything wrong so I have nothing to hide". Actual educated adults that should know better.

                      I was born and lived during a time of freedom so I can be thankful for being at the right part of the cycle AND that is all. If young people don't pick up the fight that is literally their loss. In fact, I'm of the opinion now that we may as well accelerate the process. Let's just take away people freedom so people finally get the point. We can try to hold on to dwindling freedom or we can aim for a revolution and a new start.

                    • If young people don't pick up the fight that is literally their loss.

                      "Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it on to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free." - Ronald Reagan.

            • Re:I would, but... (Score:5, Insightful)

              by RenderSeven (938535) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:37PM (#44365575)
              That would be AWESOME! If the NSA was discovered to be monitoring incoming calls to a Congressman's office the monitoring program would be over. Congress only wants them monitoring the masses, not themselves.
              • by chihowa (366380)

                They would just write an amendment to it that exempts them from being monitored. Just like the Do Not Call lists, Social Security, laws against insider trading, etc, etc...

        • by SeaFox (739806)

          Disapproval will be interpreted as treason.

          Since the representative is supposed to represent the views of his constituency, technically the congressman disagreeing with you should be considered treason.

          • The interests of his constituency, not the views. The views would be near damned impossible. How do you get 43.5% of a politician to vote for a ban on abortion, and 46.1% against, with 10.4% abstaining?

      • They only care that 51% of the people either approve or don't care enough to disapprove.
    • by TWiTfan (2887093)

      That's the standard form letter that you get in ANY state (except for maybe 2 or 3 swing states, where the outcome of any election isn't already predetermined).

    • Re:I would, but... (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:56PM (#44365149)

      Now you at least know how non-us-citizens feel when they talk to you guys, basically, "who cares if the NSA taps the whole world, as long as they don't tap us-citizens, suck it"...

      • Re:I would, but... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by CrimsonAvenger (580665) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @06:16PM (#44366427)

        Now you at least know how non-us-citizens feel when they talk to you guys, basically, "who cares if the NSA taps the whole world, as long as they don't tap us-citizens, suck it"...

        Since the NSA is in the spying business (signals analysis and such, not sneaking around spying), the fact that they spy is of no interest to me at all. It's their job.

        That said, we have this Constitution thing for a reason, and the NSA violating the Constitution IS if interest to me.

        In other words, the NSA spying on foreigners is their job. The NSA spying on ME needs a warrant and/or court order, which they don't have (don't get me started on Secret Courts..).

        If you're a foreigner being spied on by the NSA, take it up with your own government. If YOUR government won't protect you from OUR government, consider getting a new government.

        • Divide and conquer (Score:5, Insightful)

          by ElusiveJoe (1716808) on Wednesday July 24, 2013 @07:47AM (#44369331)

          If you're a foreigner being spied on by the NSA, take it up with your own government. If YOUR government won't protect you from OUR government, consider getting a new government.

          And that, girls and boys, is the reason why very small groups of people (aka governments) owns vast groups of people (aka citizens). Being selfish and ignorant makes you stupid, weak and easy to break into submission.

    • So do it anyway. Why do you assume it's totally ineffective? A form letter of any kind doesn't mean anything. They count the number of people who contact them about an issue: it's a good indication of whether it could hurt their chances of getting re-elected.

      Also, as far as senators go, Moran didn't go raving about terrorists and security. [ksn.com] That statement sounds like as of the 4th of july, he hadn't decided which way his voters were leaning.

      Your other senator, Pat Roberts, doesn't appear to have ma
      • Ah... and now I realize it's not the senate. Well fuck it. Call them anyway.
        • by cphilo (768807)
          All right, gang. I called Kevin Yoder, for what it is worth. FOR the Amash, Coyers amendment. AGAINST the Nugent amendment The intern taking the call said that he personally agreed with my stance, so maybe there is a .0001% chance of it making a difference. Then again, he may have been told to say that to everyone. Off to a Google Glass meeting.
    • Re:I would, but... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by tomkost (944194) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:50PM (#44365693)
      This is the same response that most people get when contacting their congressmen. On top of that, mine is Michael McCall, and he is the Chairman of the Dept Homeland Security committee, so he's REALLY on the side of NSA spying. His people literally laughed at me when I called to voice objection to the Cyber Security Bill.
    • by Simulant (528590)

      My congressman and I are pretty much in agreement on everything. Can I call your congressman?
    • Re:I would, but... (Score:4, Insightful)

      by tippe (1136385) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:55PM (#44365759)

      There's no guarantee that contacting your congressman will make any difference in all of this, but doing nothing diminishes your chances of affecting any kind of change to nil. Guaranteed that there is a significant part of your population that is going to be spending their evening comatose in front of the TV or watching Youtube, oblivious to or uncaring of this NSA scandal brewing around them. It's a foregone conclusion that they won't be calling their congressman. As someone aware of what is going on, who is not hopelessly entranced by "So you think you can dance" or some other such crap, and who has the power and capacity to maybe do something about it (you have a phone, don't you?), don't you think you have a duty to act on behalf of your country?

      As a Canadian, I can't do much about this particular initiative, but I have on a small number of occasions participated in blocking certain bills that I felt strongly against (new Canadian copyright reform bills), and I did this simply by contacting my MP and various ministers. Did my individual acts, when considered on their own, make a difference? Hell no. But when considered together with similar acts by thousands of other Canadians, it had a very strong impact, and was enough to stop a couple of unfavourable bills in their tracks (at least for a while). If copyright reform can elicit that kind of effort from me, why doesn't the loss and corruption of one of your fundamental "rights" elicit the same kind of effort in you? What is it going to take?

    • by SeaFox (739806)

      You think being in the State of Kansas makes you ineffective in government, try being a voter in Lawrence. Might as well not vote for anything outside the city elections.

  • by Russ1642 (1087959) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:35PM (#44364945)

    Treadstone? You're worried... It's all but decommissioned at this point. All right. What's next? Okay. This is... Black Briar. Black Briar is a joint DOD communications program that we really feel has good traction. It's got legs. It'll run and run.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:42PM (#44365015)

    Because nothing says reassuring like a vote from congress.

    Domestic spying isn't going to end folks. It's here to stay, you're all being profiled now and you don't care enough to do anything about it. The day a new iPhone or Galaxy Nexus comes out you'll all still buy it, even though you've just helped enable domestic spying through your purchase. The day the PS4 with its microphone-enabled controllers and the XBone with its Kinect 2 you'll all rush out and buy it anyway. Hell, Android phones came with CarrierIQ PREINSTALLED, remember that? A keylogger, preinstalled on your phone. They aren't even trying to hide it any more, your phone is a mouthpiece and eyepiece of the State now whether you like it or not.

    All I've seen on Slashdot and Reddit about this whole debacle is nothing but a bunch of whining and slacktivism, the most amusing of which was a meme post on Reddit whining on about the lack of "complaints" regarding the NSA lately. Complaints. That's all you have after every right and freedom your own ancestors fought to achieve, complaints? How can you honestly still sing "the land of the free" with a straight face when the anthem plays? The United States of America is the shining example of totalitarianism in the world today.

    Let that sink in for a moment and then lament everything that you've lost, because none of you care enough to take it back.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by spacepimp (664856)
      So here you are posting on Slashdot how no one is doing enough to stop this, and still you are complete anonymous pussy coward? It takes a real man to hide behind anonymity when he talks about manning up to safeguard our liberties. You don't know what I've done or how I've done it so piss off. Secondly your baited comments about technology are showing the complete lack of understanding of the political process, and the nature of technology. Going back to the stone doesn't solve the problem, and using techn
    • by LordLimecat (1103839) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:17PM (#44365363)

      The United States of America is the shining example of totalitarianism in the world today.

      We have a major problem with the constitution being seen as completely irrelevant (see Obama's decision that he can unilaterally override legislation with Obamacare / immigration; the idea that the fed has the constitutional right to mandate healthcare; the idea that state governments have the right to prohibit firearm posession; etc ad nauseam).

      That said, I have a strong feeling you've never been to a totalitarian government, and have no idea what youre talking about. All governments tend towards totalitarianism, but we're pretty far from it. Part of the issue with "nothing but complaints" is that people get this ridiculous idea that "we've lost, we have no freedoms, and we're already a dictatorship". Guess what, no we're not, we still have a large number of rights, and battles over a lot of them are STILL being fought.

      So next time the discussion over gun control or the first amendment or the 4th amendment comes up, rather than saying "think of the children" and conceding, and rather than saying "we've lost' and giving up, try actually standing up for the principle and letting it affect how you vote. I have a strong feeling that this defeatism is a lot of the reason so many people dont vote, and you really should not be complaining about slacktivism on the one hand and encouraging apathy on the other.

      • by Hatta (162192) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:47PM (#44365653) Journal

        We have a lot of rights, but they've been largely neutered. e.g., what good is the right to free speech, if your speech can never affect public policy? What good is the right to a trial by jury, if you have to risk the rest of your life in order to exercise it? Really now, what are these "large number of rights" that we still have?

        • Don't worry, buddy, the Third Amendment is rock solid. Halliburton would never let the government quarter soldiers in our homes instead of contracting with them to build more barracks.

        • The right to consume?

          Seriously, I'm pretty sure this is the one right that even our current administration would not dare to mess with.

  • by digismack (262459) <digismack@gmail.com> on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:43PM (#44365025) Homepage

    http://www.defundthensa.com/ [defundthensa.com]

    Site created by the newly initiated http://taskforce.is/ [taskforce.is]

  • by flyingfsck (986395) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:44PM (#44365031)
    I don't care about the Americans. I would prefer them defund spying on the rest of the world. That will save them way more money.
  • by bill_mcgonigle (4333) * on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:45PM (#44365041) Homepage Journal

    Justin Amash [twitter.com] is just the kind of Representative that could really make this system work, if there were 430 more like him. He posts all of his votes online and explains his rationale, which is almost always concerned foremost with the legality of the proposed legislation.

    For that reason, most of his amendments fail and he's usually on the losing side of popular votes. I'll be delighted if his amendment succeeds and is not subsequently removed in conference or by another amendment, but if I were a betting man, I would not bet on his effort tomorrow having any actual impact on the funding.

    • The LEGALITY of proposed legislation?! Are you retarded? Legislation IS legality! That's what it is! It's LAWS!
      • I would assume that is Constitutional legality.

        • I don't much care about the Constitution. Much of it provides too much freedom to the government. Much of it doesn't guarantee the freedoms people need, and provides them freedoms that are actively harmful. Much of it provides freedoms in the wrong way (patent and copyright law--no bounds, no rules, you have the freedom to lobby for eternal copyright and sue the shit out of old ladies). Much of it proscribes mechanisms that have already been subverted, such that the voice and the will and the freedom of

          • I have to disagree with you a bit. The US Constitution is government 2.x. It is production code that has had some patches applied.

            Government 1.0 didn't work out so well and had to be scrapped: See Articles of Confederation [wikipedia.org]

            A further rewrite instead of patching would be risky. There is no guarantee that a rewrite would be better, and a considerable chance it would be far worse given the feckless politicians now available to perform a rewrite.

            I think the current US Constitution could be compared to Algol:

    • I called my representative Jared Polis to tell him I support this and not only did a real person answer right away, he informed me that Polis is a co sponsor, which I'd have known if I'd read the whole article...

      If you're keeping score, congress just told me to RTFA! This has to be a good thing right?!
  • Will it mater? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:48PM (#44365057)

    At this point I'm not sure you can actually yank funds from the NSA. Their budget is secret, and they have as secret court system who's records are secret that they could use to overrule pretty much any funding provision.

    The NSA has positioned itself completely out of congressional and executive oversight. It's pretty clear that they lie to both branches and get away with it, simply because they have the ability censor and withhold any documents that could prove that they're up to no good.

    People get on the Govt's case (specifically the case of presidents and politicians they don't like) for supporting NSA actions.. I don't think it's quite that simple. Congress and the President get advice and information from the NSA and they depend on it for making policy decisions. The problem is the NSA could be feeding congress and the president bullshit, and we've got no way to prove that information right or wrong.

    There's no accountability (God, I hate that overused word but it's appropriate in this context) and there is no oversight. There is simply no way to prove that there is or is no conflict of interest, and thus we cannot trust the NSA. (Even if it turns out all of their actions are completely justified!)

    • I dont believe the FISA court has jurisdiction over the congressional budget. If congress defunds them, theyre defunded.

    • by rsborg (111459)

      At this point I'm not sure you can actually yank funds from the NSA. Their budget is secret, and they have as secret court system who's records are secret that they could use to overrule pretty much any funding provision.

      The NSA has positioned itself completely out of congressional and executive oversight. [snip]

      Wait, isn't the NSA (and other three-letter alphabet soup of organizations) part of the executive branch anyway? Doesn't the POTUS have a say as to what's going on?

      Perhaps the problem isn't that they're out of oversight - it's that they've completely corrupted it - spying on some companies (foriegn and domestic) to help their competitors who play ball - doing the same for Congress critters, and I bet they're not above threatening the POTUS himself if the soft-intimidation doesn't work (remember the outing

    • Re:Will it mater? (Score:4, Interesting)

      by tukang (1209392) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @05:19PM (#44365963)
      The NSA called an emergency private briefing to lobby the house against the amendment, so maybe it does matter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/23/keith-alexander-justin-amash_n_3639329.html [huffingtonpost.com]
  • by Anonymous Coward

    We totally aren't tracking who calls their congressman to express support for the bill. Pinkie swear.

  • by Tim12s (209786)

    This is stupid ... at this rate only the pirates will have guns (big data analytics).

    People should be advocating better oversight and more direct accountability instead of tearing down the walls of Rome.

  • by argoff (142580) * on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @03:57PM (#44365151)

    I'll believe it when the NSA is actually defunded.

    The more cynical side of me says this is bullshit politics as usual.

    Here's what's really going to happen: the congressman is going to go to the NSA leadership, and say "look, I have hundreds and thousands of constituents who want to shut you down, but if you let me spy on my political opponents, and listen in on their calls, and help me sabotage them, then I can justify and risk continuance of your funding"

    The more we petition them, the more they will be able to use shutting them down as a threat to get more political power that is turned against us. I predict it will be a cold day in hell before political leaders in DC give up that kind of power to spy on and blackmail people.

    • by boorack (1345877)

      Political kabuki theatre aside, I don't think congressmen are in position to negotiate any deal with NSA. My suspicion is that NSA tightly holds most, if not all congressmen by the balls. With amounts of data they've collected, they can blackmail just about any politician into submission. Congress will propably vote exactly what NSA wants. Face it, folks. There is no functioning democracy in the US - just as one ex-Presidedent told us. Security aparatchics have all the power - just like in old communist cou

      • by dkleinsc (563838)

        My suspicion is that NSA tightly holds most, if not all congressmen by the balls.

        Case in point: Anthony Weiner and the famous picture of his junk. 3 interesting points about that: (1) When the scandal first broke, Weiner claimed that his phone was hacked. (2) Jon Stewart, who knew Weiner when they were younger, thought that the pictures didn't match Weiner's weiner. (3) The photos in question don't show his face or any other identifying characteristics.

        I'm not a political supporter of Weiner, but it sure looks like he was set up by somebody.

    • by iggymanz (596061) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:09PM (#44365271)

      why defund the NSA, the NSA actually has a legimate mission which of course has nothing to do with spying on U.S. citizens. The job it is supposed to be doing is securing the communications of the U.S. government

      • why defund the NSA, the NSA actually has a legimate mission which of course has nothing to do with spying on U.S. citizens. The job it is supposed to be doing is securing the communications of the U.S. government

        There are two types of people in this world. Those who RTFA'd and those who did not.

        • by iggymanz (596061)

          just as there are two types of people, those who read the comment to which I was replying, and those like you who do not and spout irrelevant viewpoints

      • by rsborg (111459)

        why defund the NSA, the NSA actually has a legimate mission which of course has nothing to do with spying on U.S. citizens. The job it is supposed to be doing is securing the communications of the U.S. government

        And if you take all the government employees, contractors and the like, and go 3 hops, you pretty much have the whole of the USA.

        http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/07/18/2023207/nsa-admits-searching-3-hops-from-suspects [slashdot.org]

      • by turp182 (1020263)

        Read the bill amendment, which is quite short.. It's worded to limit FISA information collection specifically, things like phone numbers called, incoming call numbers, among others.

        It would be attached to a DOD appropriations bill (HR 2397).

        I called my representative's office. You should too.

        I don't care if they tracked my call (which was routed through the central office then to my reps office). Keep their lines ringing off the hook people!

      • Because they're almost useless. I highly doubt we actually need many of these warmongering organizations, or at the very least, they don't need nearly as much money as they're getting now.

      • why defund the NSA, the NSA actually has a legimate mission

        The ammendment is about defunding the part that spies on americans, not the entire organization. It is an achievable and reasonable goal.

  • And that happened for a reason. Homeland security and the NSA may not run the country today, but I wouldn't count on tomorrow. The actual staff at the NSA tend to be decent and patriotic. The guys at the top.... are like guys at the top anywhere.

    In soviet America, Homeland secures you.

  • by sl4shd0rk (755837) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:17PM (#44365361)

    Pretend you're making a crank call but instead of the usual 12-year old stint, just say "I'm calling to voice my support for the Amash amendment. I want the funding stripped from the NSA and given to NASA instead". It will take all of 10 minutes and even if your rep is a douche, at least you don't have to be.

  • My congressman is McClintock who is a libertarian type in a very conservative (mostly ignorant, rural) area of California.
    I agree with him on just about nothing except this one issue.
    I call him (always get some office drone who doesn't know anything) often about lots of stuff even though I know he will ignore me.
    I called him about this issue (where I know he is against NSA spying) and the office drone as usual said he didn't know how McClintock would vote.
    We'll see if he buckles under to the Republican lead

  • who is on which side - any optimists?

    That system is so screwed up, it's unbelievable!!!
  • lets all hope it succeeds. sadly though it is nearly impossible to pass an ammendment
  • by Bartles (1198017) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @04:43PM (#44365619)
    ...one man in charge, that could issue an order halting the controversial practices of the NSA.
  • Aaron Swartz when talking about the defeat of SOPA clearly pointed out that Congress is about control. They will not give up invading people's rights. Somehow we do not living exactly in a representative democracy. Unless we are totally paranoid self hating prison guards, this is not a government for an by the people.

  • Got my reps office (Wm. Lacy Clay, 1st District, MO) and asked that he vote for the defunding of domestic surveillance tomorrow.

    We shall see how it goes.

  • +1
  • by dweller_below (136040) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @05:11PM (#44365905)
    My representatives surprised me. I am in Utah. I figured that there was little point in complaining about NSA abuses. But, I couldn't live with myself if I did nothing. So I mailed my 2 Senators and my Representative. Hatch responded with the expected: "Sit down and shutup." But Senator Lee responded by saying that he agreed the NSA had greatly exceeded Constitutional authority. He said he would try to address the problem.

    So, today, I called Representative Bishop and urged him to support the Amash amendment.

    Who knows? If a Utah Senator can acknowledge there is a problem, maybe there is some hope.

    I made my letter available at: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Bd9crUNvPF71alxCVKcUmVarn80aJQJmZe4FLyzKWXU [google.com] Feel free to mine it for suggestions for your own action.

    • by antdude (79039)

      "He said he would try to address the problem." TRY. He didn't say he will do it. :/

  • by FudRucker (866063) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @05:21PM (#44365999)
    that financed the NSA in the first place, dont expect them to actually defund them, if anything they just defund it on the surface and re-route the funds through the Dept of Defense where all the hidden funding goes through already
  • by hackus (159037) on Tuesday July 23, 2013 @05:59PM (#44366303) Homepage

    Let me get this straight.

    The same people who have destroyed the republic that once existed under the Constitution and Bill of Rights are going to defund drones?

    If you believe that they actually do, I have some swamp land in Florida that is really beach front property you should buy.

    No way in hell they are going to do that, even if the press says they do, they won't secretly.

    The cache of industrial and financial information the NSA/CIA and its crony congressman get ALONE is far to valuable to just shut off.

    -Hack

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