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Criminal Complaint Filed Against Facebook After Girl's Death 559

Posted by Soulskill
from the blame-the-medium-for-the-content dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A prosecutor has opened an investigation into how Facebook allowed the publication of insults and bullying posts aimed at 14-year-old Carolina Picchio, who took her own life after a gang of boys circulated a video on Facebook of her appearing drunk and disheveled in a bathroom at a party. The Italian Parents Association has filed a criminal complaint against Facebook for allegedly having a role in the instigation of Carolina's suicide. 'This is the first time a parents' group has filed such a complaint against Facebook in Europe,' said Antonio Affinita, the director. 'Italian law forbids minors under 18 signing contracts, yet Facebook is effectively entering into a contract with minors regarding their privacy, without their parents knowing.''
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Criminal Complaint Filed Against Facebook After Girl's Death

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  • But since they've IPOed recently I don't think they could turn down my offer of $50/hour to monitor posts!
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:09PM (#43845809)

    Sue the fuckwads who kept posting these videos if you're going to sue anyone.

    If you're going to sue Facebook, you might as well sue Al Gore for inventing the Internet.

  • Italians (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:12PM (#43845831)

    This from the same country that sued scientists for predicting earthquakes (or not predicting them good enough).

    If the parents don't know about the "contract" that their children "sign" and this is a problem, then maybe the parents should be sued?

    • Re:Italians (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Real1tyCzech (997498) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @09:21AM (#43849377)

      Parents regardless. The girl was 14 and drunk at a party...

      Good parenting there, folks. Yeah...Facebook failed the girl...not you, right?

      • The girl obviously had self esteem issues from before the drunken stupor, and posting the videos only made those problems worse. Yeah, I would blame the parents first, not that blame means anything. Chances are, she is from a single mother family OR her daddy did things to her no dad would ever do. But we shouldn't say anything about the parents because ... well that would be "mean" :/

      • I think at 14 the girl shares some responsibility. I know it sounds harsh and Im sorry that she felt the need to take her life, but when you get drunk in public people will see it, and theres a good chance someone will video it. While certainly bullying behavior should be dealt with, the ultimate solution isnt to pretend that getting drunk at a party will have 0 consequences.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:13PM (#43845833)

    If that's how Italy wants to play the game, then Facebook should just require that all Italian nationals provide government identification in order to use Facebook. Then they can validate the user's age and ensure that their "contract" is legal.

    Stupid and silly, you say? I agree, but how else is Facebook - or any other website - going to ensure that they're able to operate in Italy?

    Yes, this may mean that many business simply won't be able to do business in Italy. Oh well. Italy can suffer for its own stupidity I suppose.

    • by aevan (903814) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @09:02PM (#43846145)
      Why is it seeming so farfetched?

      If for instance someone ELSE uses your email for facebook, and you want to report that to facebook, they demand government ID and the like faxed to them to prove you're you (though how that's relevant to being the owner of the email I will never guess). Also, some korean mmos I've played required you to use your korean social security number to make an account: even locking your gender to your real gender.

      It's been done/required.
  • by anthony_greer (2623521) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:14PM (#43845837)

    that all the kids didnt have pocket sized HD video cameras when I was in school - the shit that went on would have been embarrassing for anyone reliving it later...but now, kids cant make mistakes and learn from them without being taunted fr life with the stupid mistake...

    Of corse binge drinking and other crazy stuff that hapens at partys is wrong - hense the term mistake...Mistakes should be learning experiences, not stains that follow you around for life...

    How can kids be kids with cameras everywhere?

    Facebook isnt guilty here, just like guns don't kill people, its the kids that posted that shit that are to blame here...

    • by mjtaylor24601 (820998) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:34PM (#43845965)

      kids didnt have pocket sized HD video cameras when I was in school....but now, kids cant make mistakes and learn from them without being taunted fr life with the stupid mistake...

      I don't know about that. In my experience kids have never required video evidence of a mistake being made before they're willing to taunt someone for life for making it. I'm sure that having embarrassing videos floating around doesn't improve the situation at all, but stuff like this happened long before cell phone cameras were prevalent. Blaming cell phones, or Facebook for that matter, is just an excuse to ignore the underlying systemic problem.

      • by epyT-R (613989) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @11:23PM (#43846969)

        In the past, only the people present at the time of the incident know the facts, and all others had to go on was their say so. This allowed the relative importance of incidents to fade with time. With video footage of everything that proof persists indefinitely, and can be used to judge indefinitely.

      • by sjames (1099)

        It's matter of degree. I suspect that having video as evidence and as a reminder tesnd to keep the hurt alive longer than before.

      • by argStyopa (232550) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @08:17AM (#43848939) Journal

        What you're describing isn't a 'systemic' problem...it's a HUMAN problem.
        Essentially: People are dicks.

        Kids are especially dicks, before they (hopefully) start to internalize the social-conduct rules that allow us to live in societies.

        No matter how many wellness-meetings we hold, empowerment seminars we attend, etc. it won't matter. The fact is that humans are animals and there's ontological developmental stage where 'little animal humans' (hopefully) learn not to bite, hit, or poop on the floor. Shortly thereafter, there's an intellectual/social phase where we (hopefully, again) learn treat each other with a minimum of empathy and respect, usually through being treated like shit ourselves.

        It's rough, and frankly, not all survive. Until we physiologically evolve to being sensitive humans coming out of the womb, it's not going to change. And as far as I've noticed, seclusion (ie home schooling during those formative years) simply stunts that development-track in one way or another.

      • kids didnt have pocket sized HD video cameras when I was in school....but now, kids cant make mistakes and learn from them without being taunted fr life with the stupid mistake...

        I don't know about that. In my experience kids have never required video evidence of a mistake being made before they're willing to taunt someone for life for making it. I'm sure that having embarrassing videos floating around doesn't improve the situation at all, but stuff like this happened long before cell phone cameras were prevalent. Blaming cell phones, or Facebook for that matter, is just an excuse to ignore the underlying systemic problem.

        The underlying systemic problem being what? That kids will be kids?

        Kids do stupid shit - it's in the nature of being young.

        The nature of Facebook is that stupid shit becomes public and permanent so what would have been relatively minor before Facebook takes on epic proportions now.

        Facebook has broken the law and should be held accountable. I'm not saying the're directly responsible for the girls death but they certainly contributed to it by allowing minors to have accounts (and thus contracts) with them.

    • by memnock (466995) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:40PM (#43846017)

      I was not puking up drunk when I was 14. Neither were the other kids I hung out with. I don't consider that kind of behavior "kids be[ing] kids". At all.

      However, I think this is more the fault of the parents than facebook. Facebook was not the negligent party that let that child get that drunk to begin with. You can yell all you want about kids sneaking around and getting away with stuff, but it's the parents' responsibility to mind the child nonetheless.

      • by Zapotek (1032314) <tasos,laskos&gmail,com> on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:59PM (#43846131) Homepage
        Well, I was...or had been, at some singular instance when I was that age. It doesn't take a lot to get a 14 y.o. puking drunk, a few cans of beer are enough to have that effect. And that's in a long list of mischievous adventures I embarked as a kid and I turned out fine. I'm neither a drunk nor junkie nor turning tricks to survive. So, what's your point? "kid behavior" is precisely what that was, immature and unconsidered.

        I'm pretty sure others have had similar experiences which turned out to be to their benefit since they enabled them to learn that acting stupid has a nasty price a lot of the time. I've no comments about the second part of your argument though.
      • by ebno-10db (1459097) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @09:29PM (#43846307)

        I was not puking up drunk when I was 14. Neither were the other kids I hung out with. I don't consider that kind of behavior "kids be[ing] kids". At all.

        My, aren't we squeaky clean. Puking up drunk at 14, or any age, is not something to be encouraged, but it's a lot more forgivable than bullying or harassment.

        Facebook was not the negligent party that let that child get that drunk to begin with. You can yell all you want about kids sneaking around and getting away with stuff, but it's the parents' responsibility to mind the child nonetheless.

        This is a minor variant on "blame the victim": you're blaming the victim's parents. What about the parents of the scumbags that posted the video?

        • by epyT-R (613989) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @11:38PM (#43847029)

          Right, like victims never have shares in their own plight? Was she bullied? yes. Did she choose to kill herself? yes. Did the bullies kill her? no. Did facebook kill her? no. Who is responsible for her death? she is. Each side made choices along the way. Saying things that happen to make someone kill themselves is not the same thing as murdering them yourself.

          blame the bullies' parents! blame their grandparents! blame zuckerberg!! I tire of this blame chain culture. Soon it'll be too risky to do much of anything in life, but of course, the politicians tell us that the top priority for western culture is to make the soccer moms feel that their kids are safe.

          Bottom line: people do stupid shit. No amount of law or police state enforcement will change this. We should be teaching kids the tough realities of life instead of coddling their feelings. It prevents extreme reactions (like suicide or mass murder) to social stressors.

          • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

            She was 14. At that age children are not responsible adults, they can't be held entirely accountable for their actions or even judge the potential consequences properly.

            I also take issue with your claim that she chose to kill herself. Very few people make a rational, concious decision to commit suicide.

  • by girlintraining (1395911) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:17PM (#43845855)

    The Italian Parents Association has filed a criminal complaint against Facebook for allegedly having a role in the instigation of Carolina's suicide. ... 'Italian law forbids minors under 18 signing contracts...'

    The biggest lie on the internet is the answer to the question "Are you 18 or older?"

    Big deal. Almost every country is the same way. Only a parent's group would be as naive is to attempt this. And only a parent's group would try to shirk responsibility for parenting -- which is what this is really about. Look, if you can't educate your crotch fruit on how to safely use a computer, don't let them use one. Stop asking the damn government to do your job -- in the 50s, we could buy little Jimmy a chemistry kit that included Arsenic in it, or a glass blowing kit that was identical in every way to the tools used by adults, except they were made for children's hands.

    In most societies that haven't yet gone full retard thanks to people propping children up as a shield for their own political gain, children start doing adult work as soon as they are physically and mentally capable. Run around in Africa and you'll see 7 year olds tending crops and making dinner. Meanwhile, in the United States, god help you if you forget to include the fork with your teenager's meal... they'll just stare blankly at it, or even complain.

    I guess what I'm saying is: It's your parenting that's at fault, not the internet. No, really, it is, and I don't care what bullshit legal argument you care to make. If you have a crappy kid, it's very like to be a sign that you're a crappy parent. Deal with it, and stop ruining everyone else's lives with goverment regulation because you decided to breed but lacked the mental capacity to do any of the work that comes after your 15 seconds of joy.

    • by lexsird (1208192)

      Don't be so coy, tell us how you really feel.

      If this was your kid and she got bullied so bad she killed herself what would you do? I know I wouldn't be fucking around with lawyers and a lawsuit. I'd have to have some personal satisfaction of some good old fashion revenge.

      • by girlintraining (1395911) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:53PM (#43846099)

        If this was your kid and she got bullied so bad she killed herself what would you do?

        Firstly, I would have had my kid involved in extracurricular activities, had them assisting in chores and other things, and developed in them a sense of self-reliance and independence. A child that can do things for herself is not a child that can readily have their self-esteem destroyed by a bully. Such self-reliance would include self-defense classes; No girl should fear that a boy will assault her. Secondly, I'd track down the parents of the child bullying and explain the situation to them verbally and in person. If the parents didn't step up to the plate, I would explain to them in a non-verbal way my disappointment in their lack of parenting.

        But the one thing I wouldn't do is go off whining to the government or some parenting group about how my child was being bullied and, so enmeshed in my own ineptitude as a parent, allow the situation to worsen to the point my child committed suicide. I mean, really, as a parent how can you not see your child is struggling? You do whatever it takes to protect your family; You, not the government, you. It's called taking responsibility for the situation, and I would parent my child by example by showing that same self-reliant quality in my own involvement in the situation.

        But I would not engage in 'revenge'. That is the refuge of a coward; If I'm angry enough to fight someone, they're going to be facing me and they're going to be armed. And then they're going to lose.

        • by ebno-10db (1459097) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @09:52PM (#43846455)

          Firstly, I would have had my kid involved in extracurricular activities, had them assisting in chores and other things, and developed in them a sense of self-reliance and independence. A child that can do things for herself is not a child that can readily have their self-esteem destroyed by a bully.

          Of course no child ever raised in such a manner by a self-righteous parent has ever been messed up, at least at some point in their life.

          BTW, why do you write "I would have had my kid involved in extracurricular activities" and "I would parent my child" instead of "I did have had my kid involved in extracurricular activities" and "I did parent my child"? You have raised at least one child at least through their teens, right?

          If the parents didn't step up to the plate, I would explain to them in a non-verbal way my disappointment in their lack of parenting.

          Oh my, aren't we a tough character.

          If I'm angry enough to fight someone, they're going to be facing me and they're going to be armed.

          Armed? You mean like a duel in a Western? My favorites star Gary Cooper.

          If it gets to the point of armed, I say screw the "fair fight" nonsense and just treat it like a war. The only object is to win. Of course I'm obviously not the sort of heroic character you are.

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

          You should read some books on child psychology, you will get a bit of a shock.

      • by jedidiah (1196)

        > If this was your kid and she got bullied so bad she killed herself what would you do?

        If I were try to place blame with ANYONE outside of the immediate family, then it would be with the actual "bullies". These are the people engaging in any actual "harassment". Facebook is just a tool. It is a dumb machine that does whatever it's users tell it to do.

        You can't really micromanage it without destroying it or much of the rest of the Internet with it.

        This isn't just about Facebook but about ANY user created

      • by Rockoon (1252108)

        If this was your kid and she got bullied so bad she killed herself what would you do?

        I might turn myself into the authorities for negligent homicide on the grounds that I raised my child so badly that they killed themselves over what are quite clearly self-esteem issues.

        • I might turn myself into the authorities for negligent homicide on the grounds that I raised my child so badly that they killed themselves over what are quite clearly self-esteem issues.

          Another one. You have raised at least one child through their teen years, right?

          • Another one. You have raised at least one child through their teen years, right?

            I take it from your comment that you have. What, apart from your ego makes you believe that you did a remotely good job of it?

            Merely having done something once does not act as any guarantee that you (a) did a good job of it or (b) are now an expert in it.

            Nevertheless I have not encountered a group so self-righteous as other parents.

    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @10:03PM (#43846541) Journal

      I guess what I'm saying is: It's your parenting that's at fault, not the internet. No, really, it is, and I don't care what bullshit legal argument you care to make. If you have a crappy kid, it's very like to be a sign that you're a crappy parent. Deal with it, and stop ruining everyone else's lives with goverment regulation because you decided to breed but lacked the mental capacity to do any of the work that comes after your 15 seconds of joy.

      What a terribly shallow view to have.
      Day of scheduled suicide: February 8th 2013, my birthday [nydailynews.com]

      Brocklebank said Noah's school gave her a bullying incident form to fill out, organized meetings between her son and his bullies, and asked the boys that were picking on him to sign contracts pledging to stop.

      Still, she said, the harassment continued and she wanted authorities to do more. For example, Brocklebank said, Noah sat alone in the cafeteria for two months and often skipped lunch.

      The situation came to a head when Noah, who only recently received his parents' permission to open an Instagram account, uploaded the pictures showing tiny cuts on his arm and a caption with his suicide threat on Jan. 26. He blocked his mother from seeing the post.

      While her son was in the hospital on a psych hold,
      she had this website created for him: http://lettersfornoah.com/about-noah.html [lettersfornoah.com]

      I realize you're still a girl in training, but sooner or later you're going to have to learn that the world isn't so nearly as black and white as you've made it out to be.
      Or maybe you'll write a letter to Noah and explain to him that his depression and isolation is all his parents' fault.
      Your choice.

      • by girlintraining (1395911) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @12:27AM (#43847277)

        What a terribly shallow view to have.
        Day of scheduled suicide: February 8th 2013, my birthday

        Yes, let's just throw in some emotions to obfusciate the real question: Is filing a criminal complaint against Facebook the right reaction? The parents claim it is because they failed to prevent "cyberbullying". Unfortunately, there is absolutely no evidence [csmonitor.com] to support a link between suicide and bullying. As it so happens, suicide is the result of mental illness, and the DSM-V doesn't have anything listed for "recipient of mean words". Because it's a mental illness that's the cause here, specifically untreated depression, I'm going to have to turn that finger right back around at the parents. Well, what did you do when you noticed your daughter was depressed?

        While her son was in the hospital on a psych hold,
        she had this website created for him: http://lettersfornoah.com/about-noah.html [lettersfornoah.com]

        Awwww, a completely unrelated but tragic tale to distract us from objectively thinking about this and instead give in to irrational emotional impulses. I'll stick with the scientific method, kthxbai.

        I realize you're still a girl in training, but sooner or later you're going to have to learn that the world isn't so nearly as black and white as you've made it out to be.

        An ad hominem attack. Stay classy, 'Tubesteak'. (-_-) With a nickname like that, you're hardly one to diss someone else's choice.

        Or maybe you'll write a letter to Noah and explain to him that his depression and isolation is all his parents' fault.

        To a significant degree... it is. [umm.edu] It has a strong genetic correlation; it runs in families. But let's ignore the science for a minute, that seems to be more in character with the NuSlash(tm) residents like yourself that have been filling this place up since it sold out to Dice...

        Dear Noah,
         
        I'm sorry your brain is trying to kill you. I went through a 15 year long depression. As an LGBT youth, I understand better than most that it feels like this is your fault, but it isn't. People will tell you that you have to try harder, or just "will" yourself to be happy. You and I both know that's stupid; No matter how hard you try, your brain is still going to keep right on trying to kill you. It took me a long time to accept this; Cold facts and science telling me that depression is due to a chemical imbalance is little comfort. All my thoughts circle around in endless circles telling me I'm worthless, it's hopeless, I'm a burden, etc. I get it, I really do. I've been there. What I can tell you is that your condition is treatable. And it is a condition. It's a real medical condition, just like injuring your foot, or getting pneumonia is -- it's not your fault. It's an accident. These things happen. But with medication and therapy, you can free yourself of these thoughts. It's not easy. Nothing in life ever is. But it's worth it... and you have something I didn't -- a mother that cares. Lean on her until you can stand up straight again. And don't let anyone, especially not some internet pundit of questionable morality, tell you that you're a poster child for depression because you aren't. You're a survivor. You can do this.

        • DSM-V doesn't have anything listed for "recipient of mean words"

          That's quite surprising, considering the amount of fluff included in the latest version. Don't worry though, chances of something like that being included in a future revision are quite high. (snark is good against depression - see what i did here? regardless, please do keep in mind that it's not polite to bring DSM-V into a serious conversation. if it really must be done, use an earlier version)

          It's not easy. Nothing in life ever is. But it's worth it... and you have something I didn't -- a mother that cares. Lean on her until you can stand up straight again. [*] You're a survivor. You can do this.

          (* Skipping irrelevant bits)
          Hmm. I would be quite tempted to hit you with some more snark for this part, but that

  • by Nethead (1563) <joe@nethead.com> on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:25PM (#43845899) Homepage Journal

    Italian Prosecutor. Enough said.

    By any chance is this the same Italian prosecutor that went after Amanda Knox?

    The Italian legal system is a total joke. Facebook can just sit on this, nothing will happen for years.

    • The Italian legal system is a total joke. Facebook can just sit on this, nothing will happen for years.

      I won't disagree with your assessment. I will disagree with your attitude, however. Italy's government can and should be watching out for their citizens' wellbeing; It is the main role of any government. You're disrespecting the only recourse many Italian citizens have to injustice, and I do not feel that is appropriate or productive here. I understand what the parents are doing and even agree with the sentiments, but they're engaging the government in the wrong way.

      There are better ways to handle this than

      • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

        It's not an unreasonable requirement if that's what they really want. Online betting sites are required to verify age with a fair degree of certainty. If the limit is 18 then there are plenty of ways to do it. If they want to require Facebook Italy (yes, it exists) to be more diligent then that's their prerogative.

  • by Nyder (754090) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:30PM (#43845939) Journal

    Parents should be monitor their kids. I don't think it's facebooks fault, they really have no way of telling if people are using real names & real ages. Let alone verifying any of the info.

    I'd like to see the video, because I'm wondering if it was really bad, or if she was suicidal and it was a good enough excuse. I do remember when I was 14 and it seemed like everything evolved around the world i was in, and everything seems like it mattered and was important. Then again, I guess if my less then memorial moments were captured on video, i don't know.

    But I think Italy needs to be talking to the parents, not facebook.

  • Blurred Boundaries (Score:5, Interesting)

    by TranquilVoid (2444228) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:40PM (#43846013)

    Once again the internet blurs the boundaries between public/publishing and private. On one hand this is like complaining to the paper company because someone wrote a nasty note using one of their products. On the other hand web sites do control the means of publishing and bear some responsibilities.

    Note they are currently simply exploring. From the prosecutor: "This is an open investigation without named suspects, as yet. Facebook itself is not under investigation."

  • Bullying must stop (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Vylen (800165) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:43PM (#43846027)

    This is undoubtedly singing the same tune that will most likely go on for decades to come but bullying must be brought to a end.

    Parenting can only go so far - it's ridiculous to assume that telling your adolescent and hormonal child to be strong in the face of adversary will stop them from killing themselves. This poor girl left a note apologising for not being strong enough.

    There's also no chance that one parent will lecture or attempt to teach another a child that bullying is wrong - that's, unfortunately, not their place. Of course, one parent could talk to another but that's only if they know.... which if often not the case.

    However, there should be some figure of authority that should be able to do something...

    If bullying is witnessed in the playground, a teacher would usually bring it to an end, and (hopefully) punish the bully - lecture them, make them sincerely apologise, etc. Although there's been ridiculous cases where teachers end up lecturing the bullied - that just infuriates me.

    So, if this would occur in the schools and playgrounds, why not in the digital realm? It shouldn't be Facebook staff, in this case, but it should be the parents at the least. They really need to look after what their children are doing and what's happening to them. Facebook and other social media sites are just giant playgrounds for kids except there's no teachers around and that's always a recipe for disaster.

    Of course, this should be all within reason - don't exactly want parents digitally stalking their kids 24/7 but it's not difficult to just check peoples walls every once in a while...

    Anyway, that's enough ranting - hopefully that all makes sense.

    • by Nidi62 (1525137)
      The bigger issue to me is not the bullying, but rather the fact that the girl thought that this was something that could be solved only through suicide.
    • by hjf (703092)

      The problem is that facebook DOES NOT respond to "report this post" unless it's a porn report.

      It happened to me: someone impersonated my business and I tried for days to have facebook shut down the offending account, using my name and logo. Facebook didn't give a fuck - even after MY page has been online for 3 years AND I'm a facebook ads PAYING CUSTOMER.

  • by 140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @08:44PM (#43846033) Journal
    The bullies are to be blamed for the death, not facebook. May be facebook with its detailed logs can help us find the passive audience who watched the bullying and did nothing to stop. May be we can teach the passive by standers how they could help assuage the hurt feelings of the bully victim behind the scenes etc. I think the by standers are the real key in solving bullying issue. If we could find a way to make them side with the victim without exposing themselves bullying might eventually get solved
    • by wvmarle (1070040)

      A major difference is that thanks to Facebook the whole world can learn about the alleged misbehaviour of people. Not just a select group of peers. And Facebook nor the Internet forget - so five, ten years from now such information can still be found.

      Whatever stupid things I did when I was young were known by my friends/peers, most of whom I have no contact with any more, and pretty much all of it has been forgotten. And certainly can not be dug up by random third parties.

    • by hjf (703092)

      Facebook is to blame because they don't take "reports" seriously. Unless it's about porn.

    • The bullies are to be blamed for the death, not facebook. May be facebook with its detailed logs can help us find the passive audience who watched the bullying and did nothing to stop. May be we can teach the passive by standers how they could help assuage the hurt feelings of the bully victim behind the scenes etc. I think the by standers are the real key in solving bullying issue. If we could find a way to make them side with the victim without exposing themselves bullying might eventually get solved

      News agencies are held responsible for the images they publish. Facebook is no less accountable.

  • by sunking2 (521698) on Tuesday May 28, 2013 @10:06PM (#43846553)
    But I see some sense in this. The way I see it is Facebook has made billions, and more than one billionaire. With that comes certain responsibilities. Just like a bartender that keeps serving drinks. Facebook knows that it is used for bullying, pedo, and other nefarious things. And they turn as much of an eye on it as they can get away with to save face so they can maximize a profit. That is reality. The fact is people have been bullied, killed themselves, or been killed to an extent in some part thanks to Facebook. What can be done? I don't know, maybe nothing. But I do believe Facebook does very little because they are afraid it would hurt overall revenues. And that I take issue with when dealing with people under the age of 18. I'm not one of those 'think of the children people', but I'm also not one who believes profits trump all else.

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