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Crime The Courts

Wikileaks Releases Docs Before Trial of TPB Founder Warg 70

Posted by timothy
from the with-a-calculator-he-could-upload-a-virus-to-the-mothership dept.
Pirate Bay Founder Gottfrid Svartholm Warg is to be tried starting tomorrow in Sweden, after his indictment last month for computer hacking and fraud. Wikileaks has released several documents related to his detention and the associated charges. From the summary of this material: "This material includes inter alia the interrogations with GSW and his co-accused, internal correspondence from the Swedish Foreign Minister and the Swedish embassy in Cambodia, damage assessment reports by the companies and the authorities concerned, and correspondence between GSW and Kristina Svartholm and the Swedish prison authorities. The material is formally public, but the Swedish prosecution authority has refused to provide the documents in digital format. Photocopying this volume of paper costs around £350." Notable is the refusal of Warg's request to obtain a graphing calculator while in prison.
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Wikileaks Releases Docs Before Trial of TPB Founder Warg

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  • Of course (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:34AM (#43768043)

    With a graphing calculator he'd be able to properly plot the trajectory of his prison escape cannon.

    • He might start whistling into it and launch nuclear missiles. :P

    • With a graphing calculator he'd be able to properly plot the trajectory of his prison escape cannon.

      Not far from the truth. Many prisons use electronic locks on all the doors, which is in turn connected to a network and controlled through a server in the control center. You can build a card reader/writer from a tape head, and use the microprocessor inside the graphing calculator to read and amplify the pulses. You can also connect the GPIO pins to, say, the controller IC inside the door lock. A few hours of being left unattended, and using just that graphing calculator, engineer not only my own escape, bu

      • Re: Of course (Score:5, Insightful)

        by cbeaudry (706335) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @06:56PM (#43769987)

        You might sound convincing, but what you are describing is BS.

        Electronic locks require voltage to unlock, which is not local to the door, especially in a prison.
        It takes much more than a few electronic parts to spoof a card, also you first need to clone said card.

        Also, this doesnt take into account the cameras, and doors that do not have card readers for egress. These doors require remote unlocking with visual verification.

        Oh also for those wondering, you cant shoot a reade to unlock a door ;)

        • You might sound convincing, but what you are describing is BS.

          Hackers take aim at prison locks and other real-world targets [cnn.com]
          Vulnerability allows hackers to open prison doors, hiding activity from central command [venturebeat.com]

          Hacking Prisons - John Strauchs, Tiffany Rad, & Teague Newman
          Researchers Say Vulnerabilities Could Let Hackers Spring Prisoners From Cells [wired.com]

          Clearly, they're all full of shit too.

          Electronic locks require voltage to unlock, which is not local to the door, especially in a prison.

          The electronic locks run on magical sky energy. There is no voltage in those wires.

          Also, this doesnt take into account the cameras, and doors that do not have card readers for egress. These doors require remote unlocking with visual verification.

          Right, because there has never been a case of a system being thought of as so foolproof that it didn

          • by cbeaudry (706335)

            Sorry I'm late to reply, didint notice until today that you had.

            Now...

            1. I read both articles. They are about someone from the OUTSIDE, developping a small piece of code to attack a SINGLE SPECIFIC system Siemens, that seems to have a vulnerability, and this ONLY works if you have physical access to the MAIN SERVER or manage to hack your way in to it from the internet (which I agree is possible if the state is retarded and has shit for security, such as hooking up the security network to the main network.)

            2

      • by X0563511 (793323)

        Sure, he can just pull out the hot-air rework station he was hiding under his cot, so he can remove the microcontroller from the board without breaking it.

      • by RockDoctor (15477)

        Many prisons use electronic locks on all the doors,

        They might in your country (I'm going to guess that it's somewhere between Canada and Mexico), but you've got a massively industrialised incarceration business, with an incentive to maximise profits for the corporations who run the prisons. Most European prisons (there are a few exceptions in Britain, which are struggling to break even) are state-run and incarcerate typically less than a tenth of the proportion of the population that the American penal sys

  • by girlinatrainingbra (2738457) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:35AM (#43768045)
    a graphing calculator these days... is as good as a computer, just without the internet access. that's a strange point.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      I bet he wanted to play snake. That game was bitchin in high school.
    • by click2005 (921437) *

      Are prison locks or facilities even hackable?

      I dont know about prisons in Sweden but here in the UK they get access to games consoles (and France appears Xbox exclusive), satellite TV and more so I fail to see the harm in a calculator even if it was designed to be user hackable.
      http://www.gamesradar.com/over-36000-prisoners-allowed-to-own-game-consoles-in-the-uk/ [gamesradar.com]

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Most prisoners would get access to that in Sweden too. The problem here is that Mr. Warg didn't rape or murder someone, instead he did something that pissed off the authorities.

      • I dont know about prisons in Sweden but here in the UK they get access to games consoles (and France appears Xbox exclusive), satellite TV and more so I fail to see the harm in a calculator even if it was designed to be user hackable.

        They have that in American Prisons too; Keeps the maladjusted from harming society without cutting them off completely -- Except, they don't call them "prisons", they call them "parent's basements" here.

        If you've ever seen an dispute between basement dwellers, you'd know full well the danger of adding graphing calculators to the mix...

      • by BasilBrush (643681) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @04:51PM (#43769505)

        A 2008 audit revealed that 12,948 game consoles were purchased for use in prisons with taxpayersâ(TM) money. The cost of the consoles and games totaled £221,726.

        That's £17.12 per console. Including both console and games. What are they playing, Pong?

    • by oodaloop (1229816)
      Maybe he just wanted to see some BOOBIES.
    • It sounds kind of silly, but it is a computer. I don't know abut the Swedish prison system, but in America communication with the outside is regulated, monitored and subject to search – legal consul being an exception. Some of the (older?) versions have a IR, so another method to communicate. So letters could be written and then smuggled out. I have visions of crime bosses running their gang from the inside. Probably not applicable in this case but everybody needs to be treated the same.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        No this is like them not allowing Mitnick to use a phone because they thought he would be able to launch a nuke. It is ridiculous technophobia and is specific to this prisoner.

      • This is a fairly common thing, though not always practical. In Brazil crime bosses regularly DO run their gangs from the inside. A few years ago the Brazilian authorities tried to end this by putting cellphone signal blockers around prisons.

        The result was violent gang-on-police war in the streets of Sao Paulo as the gangs basically attacked the police head-on. It lasted several days and then mysteriously ended - the popular belief being that the government quietly caved and disabled the signal blockers.

  • Either a 'Droid, or iPhone camera would do an excellent job. And then you can email it!
  • by jovius (974690) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @12:34PM (#43768277)

    In the Logica incident report it says that after the incident they run the same password cracking tools as the perpetrators and managed to crack a very large number of user passwords. Their summary:

    In general, the passwords set by Logica, Applicate and their customers are:

    • - Very easy to discover by a dictionarv attack
    • - Often is still the default password that where set once when the account where
      created
    • - Not complex (as per password camplexity goes)

    Since RACF stores its passwords in uppercase only, and that there is a restriction on what
    characters can be used, the keyspace is samewhat limited, thus letting the attacker running a
    brute force password cracking attem pt gaining yet a nother advantage.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    "The material is formally public, but the Swedish prosecution authority has refused to provide the documents in digital format. Photocopying this volume of paper costs around £350."

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