Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Privacy

India Rolls Out Central Monitoring System To Snoop On All Communications 87

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the electric-eye dept.
hypnosec tipped us to news that India is rolling out a new intrusive monitoring system, using the authority of a 2000 telecom law. Quoting The Times of India: "However, Pavan Duggal, a Supreme Court advocate specialising in cyberlaw, said the government has given itself unprecedented powers to monitor private Internet records of citizens. 'This system is capable of abuse,' he said. The Central Monitoring System, being set up by the Centre for Development of Telematics, plugs into telecom gear and gives central and state investigative agencies a single point of access to call records, text messages, and emails as well as the geographical location of individuals." Privacy advocates are worried about abuse, partially because India has no effective privacy legislation, and the "...Indian government under PM Manmohan Singh has taken an increasingly uncompromising stance when it comes to online freedoms, with the stated aim usually to preserve social order and national security or fight 'harmful' defamation."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

India Rolls Out Central Monitoring System To Snoop On All Communications

Comments Filter:
  • by coinreturn (617535) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @08:39AM (#43664419)
    Copycats! The US Government has been doing that for years.
    • by gmuslera (3436)
      At least India is not the central hub that connects most of the regions of the world, nor the country that hosts most of the global sites. In US privacy legislation protects at best (anyway, diminishing) privacy of US citizens, but there is no protection of any kind for people from the rest of the world. They have free shot permission [democracynow.org] over them.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Well at least India is open about spying on their own citizens.

  • by hcs_$reboot (1536101) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @08:41AM (#43664437)
    So do you mean India does officially what the US does unofficially [slashdot.org]?
    • by Anonymous Coward

      So do you mean India does officially what the US does unofficially [slashdot.org]?

      No. The US government doesn't do that, the article you linked to is a bunch of bullshit fearmongering by people with no knowledge or insight into how the communications industry works.
      Specifically, the US has the capability to sniff International communications only. When it comes to domestic communications, the only way they can get access is either to submit a warrant for a CALEA tap, which mirrors specific phone numbers over a trunk to a local LE facility, or submit a subpoena to have the Telco/ISP turn

  • as an american (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nimbius (983462) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @08:53AM (#43664571) Homepage
    i can offer some perspective to India. At first the whole thing seems a bit absurd and draconian, you might even be outraged over it. eventually stuff like this just becomes routine enough to find its way into inane stuff like farm subsidy bills, and aside from the occaional GPS device snuck onto some college kids car you really dont notice it at all. After a while you start to actively ignore the fact that your country runs secret torture camps and foreign prisons for people who say or do the wrong things. Finally you just stop challenging it alltogether and praise it as being something, hell anything your highly factioned, ineffective government can unilaterally agree upon as passable legislation. after a few years and high profile criminal acts like shootings and bombings, you begin to look back and conclude the entire spy-on-everyone thing as being a hopelessly useless effort on the part of the government to keep no one safe.
  • by argStyopa (232550)

    Ahahahaha, I love it when some shithole 3rd world insolvent country rolls out a new method to keep control of its teeming masses.

    Maybe instead of trying to watch everyone all the time like a giant prison ward, they'd be more successful at preventing sedition by I dunno, maybe making their country a better place to live so people wouldn't be so angry all the time?

    They could start by - instead of their parliament and grand poobah (or whatever they're both called) wasting their efforts on trivial political poi

  • by tapspace (2368622) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @09:02AM (#43664635)

    The government is inefficient, that's why, here in the US, we've privatized it!

  • Progress? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @09:02AM (#43664637)

    Meanwhile 600 million Indians still have to schlep down to the nearest river or railway to take a dump in the morning because there aren't enough toilets for everyone. But I'm glad they've got their priorities straight.

    • Because if the people clamoring for basic amenities like clean water are silenced, no one will know that they don't have clean water.

  • I know in actual fact that the US and Canada aren't much better for tracking communications but at least the governments don't come right out and say it. How can you deny people the right to free speech? When you can go to jail simply by speaking your mind or taking liberty to view a document / picture then we have a problem.

    The internet is an open resource and it should stay that way, just because you can find offensive content doesn't mean it should be blocked. What offends you won't always offend
    • I know in actual fact that the US and Canada aren't much better for tracking communications but at least the governments don't come right out and say it.

      I think it's better if they do come right out and say it. Then there is no doubt that the government is suppressing freedom of speech, instead of getting mired in endless debates about whether they are or it's just a conspiracy theory.

      • by Murdoch5 (1563847)
        I would prefer to just falsely believe my freedoms are in tact. I know it's completely illogical to assume such a thing but physiologically it makes me feel better.
  • by oic0 (1864384) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @09:24AM (#43664825)
    So now every tech support call in the world is monitored by the indian government? If I defame their leaders while on the phone with Dell, will their be consequences?
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      So now every tech support call in the world is monitored by the indian government? If I defame their leaders while on the phone with Dell, will their be consequences?

      "Hello, this is Steve at Dell 'Support' in not-Bangalore, I'm afraid that the replacement motherboard for your system has been accused of injuring religious feelings and offenses against public order. We will provide you with new tracking number when they are finished 'refurbishing' it in the basement of the interior ministry."

  • Of all the things India needs to spend money on right now I'd put this near the bottom of the list.

  • That's a buzzword from back in India's socialist days. I guess the free market, democracy talk is just all a bunch of bullshit.

  • by Richy_T (111409) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @10:11AM (#43665235) Homepage

    Maybe we'll actually start to see implementation the end-to-end encryption that should have been there on everything from the beginning*.

    *Admittedly, it wasn't really practical in the beginning but those days are long past

  • China pretty much does the same thing, they even block incoming and outgoing traffic through their "Great Fire Wall". In a nation state like India, which is a union of essentially 24 different cultures, the only way the govt found to keep people together and stay as one country is through coercion, and free people might not let that happen. Given a chance India will split into 500+ princely states like before independence from the British. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_princely_states_of_India [wikipedia.org]
  • Selling the information to the CIA, MI6, Mossad, etc may partially help to pay for the Central Monitoring System... Oh, who am I kidding? It'll go straight to the pockets of a few insider employees.
  • If I had a company that outsourced development of my product to India, I'd be pretty nervous.
    • Why? There are tons of companies that already outsource products to China, and they don't seem to be worried about it. Proprietary information and trade secrets? Not anymore thanks to the plethora of hackers out there itching to get their fingers on it and give it to their bosses for a pat on the back. The only difference I see is that the Indian government is being forthright about their monitoring, while other countries throw up the "No we're not! You can't prove it!" excuse.

  • > with thestated aim usually to preserve social order

    I do believe this is the reason dictators give.

    >and national security

    Hmmm. Maybe it's about memes to placate sufficient quantities of the masses.

    • by manu0601 (2221348)

      > with thestated aim usually to preserve social order

      I do believe this is the reason dictators give.

      While I am not convinced that central snooping is necessary for that, we have to admit that it may be a real challenge to keep social order in a country with multiple languages, religions and ethnic groups, and huge wealth differences. In fact I always admired that India managed to remain a democratic nation, given the challenges it faces.

  • by NewYork (1602285)

    99% Indians are living off the grid

"Bureaucracy is the enemy of innovation." -- Mark Shepherd, former President and CEO of Texas Instruments

Working...