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DRM Electronic Frontier Foundation Media The Internet Your Rights Online Technology

Today Is International Day Against DRM 256

Posted by Soulskill
from the give-me-what-i-paid-for dept.
jrepin writes "Digital restrictions management (DRM) creates damaged goods that users cannot control or use freely. It requires users to give-up control of their computers and restricts access to digital data and media. Device manufacturers and corporate copyrights holders have already been massively infecting their products with user-hostile DRM. Tablets, mobile phones and other minicomputers are sold with numerous restrictions embedded that cripple users freedom. The proposal at table in W3C to put DRM into HTML goes even further. Fight it: use today's today is international Day Against DRM, so spread the word and make yourself heard!" The EFF suggests making every day a day against DRM.
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Today Is International Day Against DRM

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  • EA retaliates (Score:5, Insightful)

    by TWiTfan (2887093) on Friday May 03, 2013 @08:40AM (#43619395)

    EA retaliates with International "Fuck You, You're Going To Buy Our Games Anyway" Day.

    • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

      by SengirV (203400)

      Not anymore. Stick to your guns.

      Is it legal to even SAY guns anymore? Pointed sticks perhaps?

    • Re:EA retaliates (Score:5, Insightful)

      by SirGarlon (845873) on Friday May 03, 2013 @08:46AM (#43619445)
      EA makes every day "Fuck You, You're Going To Buy Our Games Anyway" Day.
      • by BobNET (119675)

        Fuck You, You're Going To Buy Our Games Anyway

        Yeah, probably, [gog.com]

      • by westlake (615356)

        EA makes every day "Fuck You, You're Going To Buy Our Games Anyway" Day.

        Exhibit A:

        Best Sellers in PC-compatible Games [amazon.com]

        We begin with the Slashdot tradition of promoting an event on the day of the event.

        There are four events scheduled, one in Bangladesh.

        The FOSS Bangladesh are suspending their website (www.fossbd.org) with an image banner, focusing the Day Against DRM-2013 and its cruel effects on IT world, activated from today, 30 April, 2013. Join us on a roadside stands as a Human ties with banners, plackerds and festoons in front of the TSC area at "Raju Circle". As it to exposes the Day Aganists DRM and why we are against DRM and DRM on HTML5.

        Day Against DRM - May 3rd, 2013 [libreplanet.org]

        You cannot make this stuff up.

        There will be the inevitable petitions to the W3C and handouts outside the Microsoft Store in Seattle and that is pretty much it.

        I was pleased to discover that the EFF page for the International Day Against DRM links to 2009's Windows7 Sins. [windows7sins.org] campaign.

        Who can forg

    • by Phrogman (80473)

      Ah but for me, every day is "Don't buy an EA game day" already. Likewise anything from SOE :P

    • And the public says, "I would rather have a cool game built by people who are paid and given health coverage than pirate something." So EA wins. People are willing to pay for content and if DRM stops the freeloaders, DRM helps the legit customers who pay full freight.
  • US-centric (Score:4, Interesting)

    by codeButcher (223668) on Friday May 03, 2013 @08:44AM (#43619429)
    I agree with the EFF's stance in the last sentence of the summary, because by the time it is "today" in the US, the day is pretty much over in the rest of the world (depending on). Especially on a Friday....

    But if one wants to have a specific day to agitate for something, maybe give some advance warning? Also, a better though-out plan than "spread the word and make yourself heard" might also be useful.

  • by n2hightech (1170183) on Friday May 03, 2013 @08:47AM (#43619459)
    Simple solution that politicians would have a hard time saying no to. All products that have DRM should be forced to display a DRM warning message on the outside of the packaging in print, TV and on line advertising. The message should explain in simple terms what the DRM does. IE - requires on line connection all the times, Requires Disk in drive all the time, prevents back up copies...etc. There should be stiff fines for selling products with DRM and no warning label. Then let the market decide. DRM is toxic to computers and users. So the proper warning is the right thing to do.
    • by jd2112 (1535857)

      Simple solution that politicians would have a hard time saying no to. All products that have DRM should be forced to display a DRM warning message on the outside of the packaging in print, TV and on line advertising. The message should explain in simple terms what the DRM does. IE - requires on line connection all the times, Requires Disk in drive all the time, prevents back up copies...etc. There should be stiff fines for selling products with DRM and no warning label. Then let the market decide. DRM is toxic to computers and users. So the proper warning is the right thing to do.

      So it will end up like those 'this product contains substances known to cause cancer by the state of California' warning labels that are ignored because they are on everything.

      • by femtobyte (710429)

        Those labels ended up useless because the law was only enacted *after* virtually every product in some categories was made with carcinogens. But DRM is not yet ubiquitous --- there are still plenty of music, videos, and books sold without DRM. If people went to the grocery store and saw one variety of cheese marked "may cause cancer!" next to three varieties not marked "may cause cancer!", which do you think they'd prefer?

    • ... grab a random DVD off the shelf behind you. Look at the back of the box.

      So, the market has spoken?

  • ERROR! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Guinness Beaumont (2901413) on Friday May 03, 2013 @08:50AM (#43619479)

    A required security module can not be activated. Your comment can not be posted.
    SecuROM has determined a debugging or an emulation tool is running. Please refer to the following procedure to remedy:

    • Please deactivate these tools before starting the program. It's not necessary to uninstall them.
    • If the problem persists, please send a SecuROM analysis file to...
  • by oobayly (1056050) on Friday May 03, 2013 @08:59AM (#43619535)

    At least IPv6 day was mentioned before hand.

  • Digital restrictions management (DRM) creates damaged goods that users cannot control or use freely

    The last movie I watched via XBox Video probably had DRM up the ying-yang but it seemed to work ok, what damage are you talking about?

    • by SirGarlon (845873)

      what damage are you talking about?

      May I borrow that video?

    • by Coren22 (1625475)

      Were you able to copy that movie to your tablet to watch it on an airplane?

      • When you're purchasing or renting a product, its important to make sure you know what youre purchasing or renting, and what it can / cant do.

        I rather imagine that what parent paid for was the right to watch a video on his XBox, one or more times.

        Im not sure if people are being obtuse when they make these kind of arguments. I think everyone gets the whole "DRM is dangerous" argument, and the arguments that it corrodes freedom. Stick to that and cut the stupid arguments.

    • Now load that video onto your kid's ipad so he can watch it on your next long road trip.

      Ever try to play your instant queue videos from Netflix on a road trip? Sorry, must stick to simple copy protection instead and take DVD's.

      • Now load that video onto your kid's ipad so he can watch it on your next long road trip.

        PROTIP: You can use online-only iPad applications on a road trip if you have a mobile hotspot or a smartphone with a tethering plan.

      • Ever tried to use a Music CD to file your taxes?

        Thats the logic you're employing. Parent never paid for the right to do any of those things, he paid for the right to watch a video on his xbox.

    • Will it still work when you want to play it on another device? Or when you (or someone who compromises your account) do something that annoys Microsoft and your XBox Live account is deleted? Can you watch it when you're bored because your Internet connection is down? Can you watch it while you're travelling on a train or a plane on your tablet or laptop? What about on the next tablet or laptop you buy, from a different vendor?
  • Alternatively... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Darth_brooks (180756) <clipper377&gmail,com> on Friday May 03, 2013 @09:06AM (#43619591) Homepage

    You could go to O'Reilly [oreilly.com] and celebrate by buying any of their 50% ebooks. It jumps to 60% if you're like me and load up your shopping cart like a madman whenever their stuff goes on sale...

  • but saddened it doesnt carry the same clout on websites like SOPA did.

    today you might want to check out the open source app store for android (https://www.F-Droid.org) and kick your facebook account to the curb.
    LinkedIn is a recruiters dream, not an employment tool and is mostly spam anyhow.
    http://www.freeshell.org/ [freeshell.org] offers affordable email and web storage so you can start to ditch google.
    godaddy.com doesnt care about your privacy (but we all know this.) maybe check out places like http://www.dreamho [dreamhost.com]
    • today you might want to check out the open source app store for android (https://www.F-Droid.org)

      What's the best way to recoup the expenses of developing a video game or other application that is distributed under a free software license? F-Droid considers the usual revenue sources for free software in home environments, namely advertisements and non-free add-ons, to be anti-features [f-droid.org].

      Lastly, maybe try linux if you havent?

      Provided your Internet connection isn't capped to single-digit GB per month, you can download and try a live USB image. Just make sure to try all your peripherals and a suspend/resume cycle before committing to using GNU/L

  • How has nobody pointed out yet that DRM stands for Digital Rights Management? Or did I just woosh it?

    • How has nobody pointed out yet that DRM stands for Digital Rights Management?

      As you correctly guessed, whoosh. To understand why you whooshed, ask yourself whose "rights" DRM protects. Then see Words to Avoid [gnu.org] to see why DRM opponents expand the R to "restrictions".

      • by schnell (163007)

        Then see Words to Avoid [gnu.org]

        RMS lost his credibility in trying to define anybody else's lexicon with his irritating, self-aggrandizing "GNU/Linux" campaign. You can use his approved NewSpeak if you'd like, but I think the arrogance of anyone trying to tell me "Words to Avoid" is more likely to make me reject their suggestions out of hand.

        • his irritating, self-aggrandizing "GNU/Linux" campaign

          I don't see how "GNU/Linux" is irritating. It distinguishes the operating systems commonly seen on desktops and servers, which use the Linux kernel and GNU components, from Android and embedded Linux systems, which use the Linux kernel without GNU components.

          • It's actually more like Linux/GNU.

            The GNU components of Linux are valuable, but relatively few of the applications or system components these days are GNU. Or, I should say, probably as many as used to be, but there are so many more additions to Linux that aren't GNU and never were.

      • How has nobody pointed out yet that DRM stands for Digital Rights Management?

        As you correctly guessed, whoosh. To understand why you whooshed, ask yourself whose "rights" DRM protects. Then see Words to Avoid [gnu.org] to see why DRM opponents expand the R to "restrictions".

        Ask yourself whose digital rights are being Managed!

        I will probably never buy another Nook. Quite a few Barnes & Noble books I've purchased were supplied DRM-free by the publishers (thank YOU O'Reilly, Baen and Tor!) Nevertheless, I cannot keep backup copies of them in the event that B&N shuts down their servers, because all of the later Nook models hide their book storage in a private space that is apparently inaccessible even when rooted.

        In other words, the publisher granted me certain rights, the

  • calling it 'restrictions' is petulent and confusing. without a verbose disclaimer about what you mean and why youve corrupted the name it becomes confusing.

    arguments against DRM are just as valid whilst avoiding cheap shots.

    • calling it 'restrictions' is petulent and confusing.

      Why? It doesn't actually manage rights it manages restrictions.

      Rights are things you are allowed to do legally. A software program cannot affect what you are legally allowed to do.

      Restrictions are things which you are prevented from doing: precisely what DRM does.

      It is a far more informitive name.

    • calling it 'restrictions' is petulent and confusing. without a verbose disclaimer about what you mean and why youve corrupted the name it becomes confusing.

      arguments against DRM are just as valid whilst avoiding cheap shots.

      What an ignorant Pirate!

      Seriously, "When. In. Rome."
      Really, we're showing a massive amount of restraint here, instead of just calling out anyone using DRM. For example: If you use DRM, then you're actively raping our childrens' and grandchildrens' and great-grandchildrens' minds. DRM is a Disgusting Racist Movement that aims to set Greedy Corporate Publishers apart as an artificial race of self entitled elitists to the detriment of all the real humans who create content: DRM permanently steals the p

      • But without a big explanation, it doesn't look like you're attemping to point out that the actual name is a deceptive ploy to obfuscate what DRM does. It looks like you've made an embarrassing mistake.

        People love writing off people who make silly mistakes as nuts.

        Look at my post above - typed it on a phone, full of typos and grammar errors. If I was trying to argue something important there, anything that could be interpretted as error on my part invites ad hominem attacks which are always good for swaying

    • So the straightforward, descriptive name "Digital Restrictions Management" confuses you, but the sugared-up Orwellian name "Digital Rights Management" doesn't? o_O

  • On a side note (Score:4, Informative)

    by rk (6314) on Friday May 03, 2013 @09:18AM (#43619693) Journal

    I'm old enough to remember when the term "minicomputer" was used to describe a computer that fit in a single room. Our desktops were "microcomputers" and our phones and tablets were "science fiction". :-)

  • by DiEx-15 (959602) on Friday May 03, 2013 @09:27AM (#43619793)
    MPAA, RIAA, EA, Sony and all DRM users and makers demand congress to declare a "Piracy Day" where everybody on Earth must pay $1,000 in order to live or face a gabillionzillion dollar fine and eternity in prison.

    Whether you use their products or not is immaterial. By God EVERYBODY steals! Everybody is a pirate and must be punished with extreme prejudice! Them dirty Hobbits are stealing our preciousss!!!!

    The bill is expected to pass with 100% support and be signed into law since these groups were "nice" enough to pay for their run for office.
  • Tablets, mobile phones and other minicomputers are sold with numerous restrictions embedded that cripple users freedom.

    I, for one, was outraged that DEC crippled my PDP-11/34a like that!

    ..

    Everyone, sometimes a word is taken away from us, by hostile forces, totally uncaring about the damage they cause by their disregard for truth and honor. Hacker was one of those words. The ruthless murder of a word taints the grief with excess anger. I don't know what to do about that, except that you must learn how to

  • by CCarrot (1562079) on Friday May 03, 2013 @12:19PM (#43621925)

    ...buy a monthly book bundle [baenebooks.com] from Baen! :o)

  • by paulpach (798828) on Friday May 03, 2013 @01:56PM (#43622995)

    I am a game developer. My game [blockstory.net] is available for ios, android, mac, and pc. So I am giving my perspective on DRM from the other side of the fence.

    I do not add DRM to the game.
    Piracy, especially in android, is rampant. I die a little inside every time I see someone stealing my work. Meanwhile DRM whispers to me "come and play".
    Laws are useless. I could spend my day sending take down notices all over the web. 5 minutes after I take one down, 10 pirates post it in some other place. So I don't do this either.

    So what alternatives do we have? lets see...

    In app purchase? Hated by a lot of people. Maybe even more than DRM.
    Subscription?: Hated
    Bundling (humble bundle)?: You can do that once or twice, not a long term solution
    Advertising? No revenue.

    So yes, go on, oppose DRM if you like. As I said before I don't do it. But don't stop there, think which one of these other business models you do support.
    Don't just say "I won't buy this game because of DRM", instead say "I will buy game X instead of Y because of DRM", as that speaks much more loudly.

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