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Variably Sunny: SCOTUS Allows Local FOIA Restrictions 86

Posted by timothy
from the like-a-slapp-in-reverse dept.
v3rgEz writes "The Supreme Court ruled Monday morning that states have the right to restrict public records access to locals, meaning one more hurdle to would-be muckrakers everywhere. Even in-state requesters are harmed: It means one more bureaucratic hurdle and another excuse for agencies to respond in paper rather than electronically. MuckRock has helped file requests in all 50 states — important for projects like the Drone Census — and we're looking for more volunteers to help ensure transparency from sea to shining sea. States impacted: Alabama; Arkansas; Delaware; Georgia; New Hampshire; New Jersey; Tennessee; and Virginia. If you live in one of the above, fill out a simple form and we can help ensure that sunshine isn't restricted depending on where you live."
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Variably Sunny: SCOTUS Allows Local FOIA Restrictions

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  • Re:9th amendment (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Hatta (162192) on Tuesday April 30, 2013 @12:13PM (#43591633) Journal

    The constitution restricts nothing. It grants powers to the government. Anything not explicitly granted is prohibited.

  • Re:9th amendment (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Zak3056 (69287) on Tuesday April 30, 2013 @12:28PM (#43591813) Journal

    The constitution restricts nothing. It grants powers to the government. Anything not explicitly granted is prohibited.

    "Congress shall make no law," "shall not be infringed," "excessive bail shall not be required," etc, sure sound like restrictions to me.

  • by Albanach (527650) on Tuesday April 30, 2013 @01:00PM (#43592155) Homepage

    No one is ever denied care for lack of insurance in the emergency room.

    That's simply not true. The ER does have to provide emergency care to stabilize a patient. If, however, you have cancer you can't just go to the ER for treatment. If you need an organ transplant to live you won't get one in the United States without some form of insurance/state coverage to pay for the operation and the ongoing costs. As your liver fails, you will be able to go to the ER to try and help reduce the toxins in your bloodstream or stem excessive bleeding. But once your life is no longer in danger and you are considered stabilized, you can be dischaged - even though the doctos know your only hope for survival is a transplant.

    If you are older and break a bone, the ER will treat you and set the bone in a cast whether or not you have insurance. They won't however cover the cost of physiotherapy to help you walk again afterwards.

    There are many who visit horpital emergency rooms and are denied the care they need to function or indeed to live.The largest for-profit network of hospitals, HCA, now demand up-front payment from ER patients if their condition is deemed to be not a true emergency.

  • Re:One person (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Spazmania (174582) on Tuesday April 30, 2013 @01:11PM (#43592295) Homepage

    It's not the government's time. As a citizen of Virginia, it's my time. *I* paid for it.

IF I HAD A MINE SHAFT, I don't think I would just abandon it. There's got to be a better way. -- Jack Handley, The New Mexican, 1988.

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