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Piracy Politics

The Pirate Bay's 'Move' To Korea Was a Prank 142

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the couldn't-wait-three-weeks dept.
judgecorp writes "The Pirate Bay's announcement that it was moving to North Korea was a prank, making fun of gullible readers. Admitting the hoax, the site said 'You can't seriously cheer the 'fact' that we moved our servers to bloody North Korea. Applauds to you who told us to f*** off. Always stay critical. Towards everyone!'" The essence of a good troll: so absurd it could just be true.
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The Pirate Bay's 'Move' To Korea Was a Prank

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  • NK, the butt of the world's jokes.
    • by bennomatic (691188) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @02:30PM (#43095423) Homepage
      Why did the NK submarine fleet sink? They left the screen doors open.

      Why did the submarines have screen doors? To keep the fish out!

      I'm sure that Poland is thrilled that NK has taken over their long worn mantle.
      full disclosure: there is a lot of Polish peasantry among the branches of my family tree.
      • by Ol Biscuitbarrel (1859702) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @02:48PM (#43095649)

        Did you hear about Kim Jong dying? I hadn't heard that he was il.

        • by Antipater (2053064) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @02:52PM (#43095693)
          His son took over, though. Did you at least know that he had Un?
          • Re:North Korea (Score:5, Insightful)

            by clarkkent09 (1104833) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @03:36PM (#43096193)

            The real joke is that many of the site users apparently cheered the "move". Apparently forced labor concentration camps, widespread torture, arbitrary arrest and murder of citizens by the government, collective punishment for entire families and villages, complete absence of freedom of speech, no independent media, death penalty listening to foreign radio are bad, but not as bad as IP laws that prevent you from downloading stuff you want for free.

            • by GameboyRMH (1153867) <gameboyrmhNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @03:50PM (#43096361) Journal

              I wasn't sure who to side with but I'm ready to admit that NK is a bit worse than the MPAA/RIAA.

              • by thegarbz (1787294)

                Why are you taking sides?

                Why can't we just accept that just because a government is batshit crazy doesn't mean that some of their policies are actually ok. Following on that premise why can't we then exploit those policies to counteract some of the stupid decisions of other governments?

                When did the issue become all or nothing? There's plenty of hate to spread around to all governments.

            • by loufoque (1400831)

              I wasn't aware any of the above was bad.
              Did your god tell you it was?

            • by detain (687995)
              I'm pretty sure the US courts handle IP infringment a lot more harshly than any of the stuff NK does.
              • I'm pretty sure the US courts handle IP infringment a lot more harshly than any of the stuff NK does.

                I take it you haven't heard about their "three generations rule"? If you do something deserving of a concentration camp, they also send your parents, siblings, and children along.

                • by idontgno (624372)

                  Yeah. Those *AA bastards are real bastards.

                  Wait, what? You're saying that that's what NK does? Huh. I'da sworn that was more like the pigopolists.

                • If you do something deserving of a concentration camp, they also send your parents, siblings, and children along.

                  Only seems fair. They wouldn't want you to be lonely.

                • by evanism (600676)

                  in a household, this is exactly what the MPAA does. Everyone is guilty.

            • Wait, are you describing North Korea, or Saudi Arabia, or various South and Central American countries? You know, because The US and Europe are not really against those things if they think they can get free stuff from them.

            • Re:North Korea (Score:5, Informative)

              by SeaFox (739806) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @06:27PM (#43098101)

              The real joke is that many of the site users apparently cheered the "move". Apparently forced labor concentration camps, widespread torture, arbitrary arrest and murder of citizens by the government, collective punishment for entire families and villages, complete absence of freedom of speech, no independent media, death penalty listening to foreign radio are bad, but not as bad as IP laws that prevent you from downloading stuff you want for free.

              Red herring much?
              Cheering a move to NK doesn't imply cheering human rights abuses.

              The cheering was for no other reason that the Pirate Bay was moving to a country that would not give a rat's ass what the U.S. or EU thought about copyright law and file sharing, nothing more. It is possible to hold mutually exclusive opinions on these two topics last time I checked.

              • by evanism (600676) on Thursday March 07, 2013 @12:19AM (#43101331) Journal

                Indeed your argument is true.

                I don't agree with countries that torture, hold extraordinary renditions, run black concentration camps, indiscriminate murder other countries citizens, incarcerate its innocent citizens or bankrupt them to protect corporate larceny, but I do host my sites there.

            • Why does moving your servers to North Korea somehow imply your support for their government? All it would do is cause the US to hate them even more (if that's possible). So you're just exploiting the dictatorship, perhaps bringing it's end a bit closer (an extra server would cost them what? 20% of their national power supply?)

            • by dbIII (701233)
              It just means not enough people are paying attention to the world around them.
            • For Internet kiddies "fascism" is when mum and dad tell them to move out to their own place and get a job to pay the rent, and then the RIAA tells them they need to pay for HBO and movies rather than just downloading them for free.

              The idea that there's a actual holocaust happening on the other side of the world is far beyond their comprehension, hence the irritating "North Korea is the Best Korea" meme.

              Spoiled little shits.

            • by sribe (304414)

              The real joke is that many of the site users apparently cheered the "move". Apparently forced labor concentration camps, widespread torture, arbitrary arrest and murder of citizens by the government, collective punishment for entire families and villages, complete absence of freedom of speech, no independent media, death penalty listening to foreign radio are bad, but not as bad as IP laws that prevent you from downloading stuff you want for free.

              Guess what? Dennis Rodman. Guess what? You know. Guess what? It's the same here. Guess what? Politics. Guess what?

            • by Sigg3.net (886486)

              As a Scandinavian I got the joke, and found articles on the fake routing. I'm not sure, but I read most comments that didn't read like an 11-year old as playing along with the joke.

          • Have you ever had North Korean food?

            Neither have they.
            • by dbIII (701233)
              I think you are barking up the wrong tree.
              Starvation jokes aside, they used to export food to China until maybe about the 1970s when an even more insane industrialisation effort than the 1920s-30s USSR one changed them into a country that cannot feed itself.
      • by Anonymous Coward

        Fellow Polak here.

        I always wondered why Polish jokes exist. When in fact, the Poles were the ones who first cracked the Enigma code (The Engigma machine was based on a commerical encoder for banks) - the English continued the work but they would never have been able to do what they did without the Poles (U571, or whatever that shitty movie was called, was pure horseshit entertainment. ).

        They better vodka than the Russians.

        The jokes are because of envy?

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by cusco (717999)
          Don't know about elsewhere, but I grew up in northern Michigan were there were quite a few Polish families who homesteaded in the 19th century. The soil quality there was so poor (mostly sand) that harvests were generally pretty poor. Many immigrant families ended up with three meals a day of cornmeal mush and potatoes, and children raised on that kind of diet tend to mentally stunted if not outright retarded. In our area at least the Polack jokes had some relevance.
        • Re:North Korea (Score:4, Informative)

          by Sperbels (1008585) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @03:22PM (#43096055)
          I always wondered why Polish jokes exist too. Looks like Wikipedia has a pretty good write up on it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_joke [wikipedia.org]
        • I always thought it had something to do with the fact that Poland still had a horse-mounted cavalry at the beginning of WWII. Hitler famously staged a fake cavalry attack to justify invading Poland. I think that image of Polish cavalry charging across the border with their swords raised toward's Hitler's tanks has resonated through the ages.
          • Re:North Korea (Score:5, Informative)

            by CrimsonAvenger (580665) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @05:46PM (#43097669)

            I always thought it had something to do with the fact that Poland still had a horse-mounted cavalry at the beginning of WWII. Hitler famously staged a fake cavalry attack to justify invading Poland. I think that image of Polish cavalry charging across the border with their swords raised toward's Hitler's tanks has resonated through the ages.

            Of course, the truth was that that never happened. Polish cavalry were dragoons (that mans they rode horses to battle, then got down off the nags and fought like innfantry), just like every other cavalry force still extent then (USSR used them, for example).

            It should also be noted that there were more horses in use by the Wehrmacht than the Poles. 90+% of German "prime movers" were draft horses, not trucks/tractors.

          • by citizenr (871508)

            I always thought it had something to do with the fact that Poland still had a horse-mounted cavalry at the beginning of WWII. Hitler famously staged a fake cavalry attack to justify invading Poland. I think that image of Polish cavalry charging across the border with their swords raised toward's Hitler's tanks has resonated through the ages.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWezYFUTn-4 [youtube.com]

            In polish, but you can tell by picture alone whats going on

            basically myth is this
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWezYFUTn-4&t=32s [youtube.com]
            reality looked more like this
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWezYFUTn-4&t=5m49s [youtube.com]

            Polish Army even had rifles what easily penetrated early German WW2 tanks armor.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wz._35_anti-tank_rifle [wikipedia.org]

        • Polish jokes were a staple of my childhood, and I like to think it's because they were considered inoffensive-- we didn't really think that being anti-Polish was a thing (we'd never encountered anyone who really hated Poles), so we figured no one was hurt by them. It was like making fun of Belgians, or something.

          • by AK Marc (707885)
            They were anti-immigrant jokes. Every immigrant group was made fun of at one point or another. The US if formed exclusively of immigrants (yes, even the "natives" immigrated from Asia), yet is staunchly anti-immigrant. "I got here first, get out." has replaced "Send me your..."
            • by shaitand (626655)
              There doesn't seem to be any modern day anti-immigrant stance toward legal immigrants. Unless you count people coming on work visas to take jobs at below market rates and leech money out of the economy to be sent overseas.
              • by AK Marc (707885)
                I hear lots of things that disprove your assertion. How about an experiment, remove all laws that restrict immigration, and see if the people welcome the newcomers with open arms, or start whining about the newcomers. And yes, I hear all sorts of things that are anti-immigrant. I know 3rd generation Mexican families that have been insulted for speaking Spanish to each other in public. They weren't immigrants, but descendants of ones, same as you. I have a latter written by my great grandfather when he
        • It's the telephone company that's behind all the polack jokes.

          They're always driving Poles into the ground.

        • The jokes started long before WWII. Blue and Gray Laughing [amazon.com], a book about the humor of soldiers during the American Civil War, has a number of them scattered throughout (end shameless plug for a book written by my relative).

          During the war, the "Dutch", a catch-all term for Germanic and similar-enough-to-Germanic-that-Americans-didn't-care European immigrants (Germans, Dutch, Finns, etc.) were generally derided by both sides. Their communities seemed generally disinterested in the war, and their corps in th

          • by citizenr (871508)

            It's very possible that the Poles got swept up in that sentiment, though Polish immigration to the US really didn't kick into gear until decades later.

            Yes. Im sure it was all because of people like Kociuszko (hint : Kociuszko's Monument in West Point)

      • by fredrated (639554)

        Why would you need to leave a screen door open? A closed screen door would have the same effect.

    • NK, the butt of the world's jokes.

      How about... NK, the butt of the world.

      • Both are irrelevant.
        What we could discuss instead is the viability of North Korea as a server hosting country.

        Given that one of Korean family names is "Ping", I'd say they are pretty well positioned.

    • by wbr1 (2538558)
      >NK, the butt of the world.
      FTFY
  • Oh really? (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @02:21PM (#43095321)

    Well I don't believe you.

  • Thank the Robolords for that!

  • by Grayhand (2610049) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @02:23PM (#43095341)
    Apparently Kin Jong Un was inconsolable as he read the story in his pirate outfit. Then some one explained to him Pirate Bay wasn't an actual bay with pirates.
  • They're just a bunch of kids, and no need to trust them.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      They're just a bunch of kids, and no need to trust them.

      Yep. Nice to see our culture is marginalizing itself as it struggles in a fight for legitimacy.

    • This is what is most disappointing. It's hard to take people seriously when they're pulling childish pranks like this. And there are a lot of issues regarding copyright and piracy that we *should* be taking seriously and debating. Stunts like this are annoying distractions, and only strengthen the RIAA/MPAA and its ilk.

      • by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @04:27PM (#43096793) Homepage Journal

        This is what is most disappointing. It's hard to take people seriously when they're pulling childish pranks like this. And there are a lot of issues regarding copyright and piracy that we *should* be taking seriously and debating. Stunts like this are annoying distractions, and only strengthen the RIAA/MPAA and its ilk.

        Read: "I totally fell for it."

        You know what makes it really hard to take someone seriously? When the get all butthurt because they didn't get the joke.

      • Like Abby Hoffman wasn't serious.
    • It's an organization dedicated to subverting the law and what made you not trust them was an absurd prank about moving their servers to North Korea?

      • It wasn't against the law when they started it. The laws were made after the fact.

      • by shaitand (626655)
        The law is unjust and they are engaging in a civil disobedience protest.
    • They're just a bunch of kids, and no need to trust them.

      You forgot to tell them to get off your lawn.

      Damn you, Alzheimers!

  • They've already put the pressure on China to sanction North Korea [csmonitor.com].

    Wherever The Pirate Bay goes next, watch out! They might just invade!

  • When I first read that story, I was indeed looking for a link to The Onion.
  • They should move to Antigua [wired.com]. Even will be approved by the WTO.
  • Kudos to those that told us to fuck off.

    Are pirates really so odd that piracy is completely ok but move a server to a communist dickhead county and it's fuck you pirate bay.
    • Not really all that odd, when you consider their philosophy is that since software is not a tangible good, it is impossible to steal (copies aren't stolen, because the original is still there).

      Besides, even if they did see it as theft, it still wouldn't be that odd that thieves would take a moral stance against despotic, iron-fisted dictators. "No honour among thieves," and all.

      What I find odd is the fallacy of equivocation, i.e. stealing software is morally the same as forced labor and state-sanctioned mur

  • by paiute (550198) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @03:57PM (#43096451)
    They moved their servers to Hugo Chavez' crypt.
  • by futhermocker (2667575) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @03:59PM (#43096473)

    because they applied some BGP trickery to have the IP resolve in NK
    https://rdns.im/the-pirate-bay-north-korean-hosting-no-its-fake [rdns.im]

  • This is almost as absurd as the rumor that floated around yesterday that Obama held a candlelight vigil at the White House in honor of Hugo Chavez. A lot of people ate it up and went into orbit... then it was revealed to be a hoax... except some people apparently showed up at the White House, candles in hand, and had a vigil for him anyway out on the street and put pictures of it on various social media.

    Kinda the odd, self-fulfilling hoax I guess.

    • by fl!ptop (902193)

      except some people apparently showed up at the White House, candles in hand, and had a vigil for him anyway out on the street and put pictures of it on various social media

      Was it organized by Sean Penn and Danny Glover?

  • You mean he wasn't over there to float the Pirate bay deal? Hmm...
  • Always stay critical. Towards everyone!

    Okay, that second statement isn't a sentence.

"Success covers a multitude of blunders." -- George Bernard Shaw

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