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Groups Accuse EU Parliament of "Caving In" To Pressure From Business and US 58

Posted by samzenpus
from the it-all-makes-perfect-sense-expressed-in-dollars-and-cents dept.
angry tapir writes "The European Parliament's industry committee has approved more than 900 amendments to proposed new data protection laws. Civil liberties groups and consumer organizations were quick to accuse members of the Parliament (MEPs) of caving in to pressure from big business and the U.S. 'The Conservative and Liberal parties in the Parliament have voted against the interests of European consumers, who expect MEPs to ensure existing E.U. data protection standards are not diluted,' said Monique Goyens, director general of the European consumer organization, BEUC."
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Groups Accuse EU Parliament of "Caving In" To Pressure From Business and US

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  • Conservatives and liberals voting against the peoples interest - who would of guessed.

    (note for our American friends - liberal means center right here)

    • No, liberal means people who are interested in business interests.
      • by Anonymous Coward

        which tends to amount to the same thing.

      • Re:Quelle surprise! (Score:5, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 21, 2013 @05:14AM (#42964541)

        No, liberal means people who are interested in business interests.

        I would say: no... but it's 50% yes and 50% no.
        Liberal in Europe and in US has a different meaning and the first statement is much more correct. For instance, in Italy the "Partito Liberale Italiano" was a center-right party.
        The point is that "liberalism" applied to economy is a center-right concept, while "liberalism" applied to "social matter" is a center-left concept.
        The difference at this point is easy: in EU we apply the meaning of "liberalism" to economic matters and US people apply this word to the social matters.

        • by jonbryce (703250)

          Bear in mind that anyone in Europe who wanted to abolish state healthcare provision would be considered so extreme right wing that they would get less votes than the Monster Raving Looney Party. Actually they probably wouldn't get any votes at all, because they wouldn't be able to find the 10 or so people needed to nominate them on the ballot paper.

          • by maxadamo (2847197)
            (I am the same person who commented before)..... I don't know. In my opinion, after 1989 the situation is getting every day worse in the whole Europe and we're losing those rights that we had before. Nowadays, everybody, center-left and center-right politicians, tend to abolish "welfare" and "state healthcare". Only extreme left is trying to defend those rights.... and I belong to those "crazy" extreme-leftists. In Italy, before '90, we had things like "equo canone", and renting a house was really cheap, we
            • by khallow (566160)

              Only extreme left is trying to defend those rights.... and I belong to those "crazy" extreme-leftists. In Italy, before '90, we had things like "equo canone", and renting a house was really cheap, we had the "scala mobile" and salaries were growing with the cost of life, car insurance prices were controlled and they were very cheap.... we had, we had, we had.... now we have nothing

              Your country squandered its wealth for a few decades, and that came back to bite you. Such an amazing coincidence.

              Now they call it "modernity", but it really looks like something that we already had in the XIX century.....

              I think people who worry about things reverting to the 19th century should be solidly in the "conservative" camp. You're about as liberal as the horse and carriage at this point.

            • by manu0601 (2221348)

              (I am the same person who commented before)..... I don't know. In my opinion, after 1989 the situation is getting every day worse in the whole Europe and we're losing those rights that we had before. Nowadays, everybody, center-left and center-right politicians, tend to abolish "welfare" and "state healthcare".

              Our political elite are for the most utterly contaminated with neoliberalism thinking. And after three decade most people now can see neoliberalism means povery for them, our political elite are now mostly disconnected from the population. See how absention, far right and radical left are raising in Greece, Spain, Portugal, France and Spain.

        • by Kjella (173770)

          The point is that "liberalism" applied to economy is a center-right concept, while "liberalism" applied to "social matter" is a center-left concept.

          At least here in Norway I'd disagree, the left is into high taxes, many government services and little economic freedom as well as trying to curb anything they consider harmful or unhealthy activities so little social freedom as well. They want to both provide for you and protect you from yourself. Here I'd say both kinds of liberals are to the right of that, but it's not the "same" right as they disagree almost as much with each other as they do with the left.

          • The point is that "liberalism" applied to economy is a center-right concept, while "liberalism" applied to "social matter" is a center-left concept.

            At least here in Norway I'd disagree, the left is into high taxes, many government services and little economic freedom as well as trying to curb anything they consider harmful or unhealthy activities so little social freedom as well. They want to both provide for you and protect you from yourself. Here I'd say both kinds of liberals are to the right of that, but it's not the "same" right as they disagree almost as much with each other as they do with the left.

            That describes perfectly what is happening in the U.S.

      • by jkflying (2190798)

        No, that's Fascist. In the US, both parties currently toe that line.

      • Well, it depends what you mean by "here".

        I was refering to the article, where "Liberal" is a reference to the ALDE (Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe). This is grouping of European Cenre-right parties. (The lib-dems in the UK, MoDem in France...)

        If one read "here" as meaning "here in Europe" then "Liberal" would often be understood as "economicaly liberal", which is what you mean I guess.

    • Re:Quelle surprise! (Score:5, Informative)

      by Joce640k (829181) on Thursday February 21, 2013 @06:43AM (#42964957) Homepage

      who would of guessed.

      In English we say "would have guessed".

      • by DRJlaw (946416)

        who would of guessed.

        In English we say "would have guessed".

        No, in English we say "would've guessed." Which is phonetically identical to "would of guessed."

        Thank you for proving that snooty language jerk-ism is not limited to the French, however.* We all benefit through self-serving efforts to match the worst characteristics of each other.

        (*Some of the French)

        • by Joce640k (829181)

          No, in English we say "would've guessed." Which is phonetically identical to "would of guessed."

          Even if that were true* it wouldn't make it OK to write "would of".

          [*] It isn't, 'would've', rhymes with 'love', not 'of'

          PS: You never heard anybody say "would have"? Where did you grow up?

          • by DRJlaw (946416)

            [*] It isn't, 'would've', rhymes with 'love', not 'of'

            PS: You never heard anybody say "would have"? Where did you grow up?

            In the same land as Merriam-Webster, apparently.

            love (\'l[schwa]v\)
            of (\[schwa]v; especially before a consonant -.[schwa]... when emphatic, as when it is the last or the first word in a sentence, |[schwa]v...\)

            Phonetically identical '[schwa]v' where [schwa] is the printed upside-down e that Slashdot cannot reproduce properly from Unicode.

            You've never heard anybody say "would've"?
            You grew

        • I wish I could flag you as someone that will strongly defend bad ideas.

          A flag that would prevent me from seeing this crap.

          Country bumpkin is not a valid dialect.

  • "text that would allow companies that control data and third parties to process personal data without informing consumers, on grounds of "legitimate interest""

    "The definition of personal data has also been narrowed to exclude 'pseudonymous data' and suggested safeguards were ignored. This is risky because such data can easily be associated to individuals"

    So they don't always have to tell you they're collecting personal info and once your name, phone number, profile picture and other identifying data is stri

    • once your name, phone number, profile picture and other identifying data is stripped, they can do whatever they want with your data?

      If all other identifying data has been stripped away, it is really "your" data any longer?

      I'm not sure that the situation you describe here would protect the data under the existing rules [europa.eu] either:

      (a) 'personal data' shall mean any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person ('data subject'); an identifiable person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identification number or to one or more factors specific to his physical, physiological, mental, economic, cultural or social identity;

      I think there is a difference between the situation which you describe (which seems to be anonymous data) and pseudonymous data, though, in that pseudonymous data does not have all identifying data stripped out, but rather replaced by a less obvious identifier.

      The phone number 07700 900771 might become a2t6#g1

      • by c0lo (1497653) on Thursday February 21, 2013 @04:48AM (#42964399)

        >

        To my mind, provided that the algorithm doing the conversion is appropriately protected, pseudonymisation may be one good method of reducing the risk associated with the processing of personal data, protecting it in the event for a data breach, and thus be a form of security measure, but is unlikely to stop the data from being capable of identifying the individual, in the hands of the party carrying out the pseudonymisation.

        With all respect, your mind and common sense are superseded by better minds:

        Robust De-anonymization of Large Sparse Datasets [utexas.edu]

        Our techniques are robust to perturbation in the data and tolerate some mistakes in the adversary’s background knowledge.
        We apply our de-anonymization methodology to the Netflix Prize dataset, which contains anonymous movie ratings of 500,000 subscribers of Netflix, the world’s largest online movie rental service. We demonstrate that an adversary who knows only a little bit about an individual subscriber can easily identify this subscriber’s record in the dataset. Using the Internet Movie Database as the source of background knowledge, we successfully identified the Netflix records of known users, uncovering their apparent political preferences and other potentially sensitive information

        Deanonymizing Mobility Traces: Using Social Networks as a Side-Channel [umd.edu]

        Location-based services, which employ data from smartphones, vehicles, etc., are growing in popularity. To reduce the threat that shared location data poses to a user’s privacy, some services anonymize or obfuscate this data. In this paper, we show these methods can be effectively defeated: a set of location traces can be deanonymized given an easily obtained social network graph.

        I know... series [whitehatsec.com] (scroll to the bottom of the page)

        A LOT About Your Web Browser and Computer
        The Country, Town, and City You Are Connecting From (IP Geolocation)
        What Websites You Are Logged-In To (Login-Detection via CSRF)
        I Know Your Name, and Probably a Whole Lot More (Deanonymization via Likejacking, Followjacking, etc.)
        Who You Work For
        Your [Corporate] Email Address, and more

        De-anonymizing social networks [stanford.edu]

        Network de-anonymization task is of multifold significance, with user profile enrichment as one of its most promising applications. After the deanonymization and alignment, we can aggregate and enrich user profile information from different online networking services and make the bundled profiles available for end-users as well as third-party applications.

        Actually you know what? lmgtfy [lmgtfy.com]

      • once your name, phone number, profile picture and other identifying data is stripped, they can do whatever they want with your data?

        If all other identifying data has been stripped away, it is really "your" data any longer?

        Yes. Read up on "plagiarism" and "copyright". Sheesh!

    • So they don't always have to tell you they're collecting personal info and once your name, phone number, profile picture and other identifying data is stripped, they can do whatever they want with your data?

      Well no -- if it's for example medical or health care research, then you do have to get explicit, specific, informed concent that can be withdrawn at any time...
      There has to be some limits in a civilized society, you know!

  • by Anonymous Coward

    vote green!

  • When the same group made such a big deal out of killing ACTA? dog and pony show to make it look like they cared so they could turn around and do this.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 21, 2013 @04:40AM (#42964347)

    _US_ corporations lobbying in the _EU_ -- Disgusting.

    Hopefully there'll be a marked drop of Amazon and Ebay customers in the EU after this.

  • Keep legislation out of the net.

  • Act NOW! (Score:5, Informative)

    by I)_MaLaClYpSe_(I (447961) on Thursday February 21, 2013 @05:29AM (#42964633)
    We need to act now on this!

    privacycampaign.eu [privacycampaign.eu]

    This data protection directive is probably the most serious and important thing for net politics ever. It will very much determine the direction of the world, data protection wise. Not only for the EU, but the world and not only for the next 15-20 years but probably forever.

    If we now manage to get a strong data protection law in the EU, US companies will have to learn to deal with it and will have far less problems with data protection consumer rights in the US as well.

    A strong data protection law builds the basis for fighting all other laws that endanger freedom and privacy. Be it SOPA, PIPA, CETA, ACTA or TPP like treaties, be it CISPA and cybercrime laws, be it a PATRIOT act, forward data retention, 6 strikes, you name it. A strong data protection law is the basis to fight all these Very Bad Things(tm) and if we don't get the momentum in the civil society to stand up now and fight for the right for privacy, all will be lost.

    Europeans: keep wirting your MEPs within the next two months. Call them and send them FAX letters. Make sure they know that civil society will rise if they screw it up, like we did with ACTA.

    Here you can phone your MEPs for free! [memopol.lqdn.fr] Prepare yourself to go onto the streets again.

    Time schedule:

    • 20. February 2013: Vote in ITRE
    • 21. Februar 2013: Vote in EMPL [memopol.lqdn.fr]
    • 18. - 19. MÃrz 2013: Vote in JURI [memopol.lqdn.fr]
    • 24. - 25. April 2013: Vote in LIBE [memopol.lqdn.fr]
  • "The definition of personal data has also been narrowed to exclude 'pseudonymous data' and suggested safeguards were ignored. This is risky because such data can easily be associated to individuals," she continued.

    This amendment seems similar to a Yahoo position document, leaked on Wednesday, in which the U.S. tech giant recommends supplementing "the definition of personal data in the draft regulation by adding a distinct subset of data considered pseudonymous, which will trigger differential obligations."

    M

  • Time and burn them at the stake.

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