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Piracy The Courts Your Rights Online

Alleged Operator of Demonoid Released From Jail 60

Posted by Soulskill
from the unfruitful-expenditures-of-effort dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Last August, BitTorrent tracker Demonoid was taken down by law enforcement in the Ukraine. This followed raids in Mexico to arrest the people who ran the site. Panama is somehow involved, too. However, a recent review filed by the U.S. Trade Representative reveals that the criminal case against the main (alleged) operator of Demonoid has stalled, and the person has been released from imprisonment. 'For how long the alleged Demonoid operator was imprisoned is not mentioned. However, the criminal case is ongoing according to the copyright holders, who further mention that it's now proceeding in Ukraine. Demonoid, meanwhile, has moved to Hong Kong where it found a new hosting company and a new .HK domain name. Whether the BitTorrent tracker will ever return to its full glory has yet to be seen.'"
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Alleged Operator of Demonoid Released From Jail

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  • by Bobb Sledd (307434) on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @02:26PM (#42874409) Homepage

    It's just "Ukraine" not "the Ukraine." (Perhaps you're thinking of "the U.K.")

    • by Jhon (241832)

      Articles are not used in (current or former) Soviet Russia.

      - Jhon, from The Los Angeles, The California, The U.S. (Hey, that one works!)

      • Re: (Score:1, Redundant)

        by vux984 (928602)

        - Jhon, from The Los Angeles, The California, The U.S.

        Jhon, from the city of angels, the state of california, the united states of america

      • by tehcyder (746570)

        Articles are not used in (current or former) Soviet Russia.

        While true, that is irrelevant. We're talking about English usage. A Russian would say (in Russian) "I am going to cinema" but in English we say "I am going to the cinema". Whether it's a Russian cinema or not doesn't matter.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Not this again. There's a reason some call it The Ukraine, old habits just die hard. Fortunately the internet champions of accuracy are here to save us.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_of_Ukraine#.22Ukraine.22_versus_.22The_Ukraine.22

      • by mrbester (200927)

        This is like BBC radio DJs in the 70s / 80s always referring to bands like Sweet, Pink Floyd and Buggles by putting "The" in front, even when there were other bands they didn't, like Art of Noise and Brotherhood of Man which almost cry out for the definite article.

        I swear I heard "The Depeche Mode" once. Made me cringe.

    • by Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @02:41PM (#42874573)

      It's just "Ukraine" not "the Ukraine." (Perhaps you're thinking of "the U.K.")

      The rule is that when it was part of the Soviet Union and a specific region, it was OK to call it "The Ukraine" but since independence the country has been quite clear in its official documents, embassy names, etc. that in the English language it is now simply known as Ukraine. Rules for other languages such as French may be different.

      I got into an argument once via email with a Ukrainian woman in Kiev who insisted that because some English grammar book written in the 1980s (she actually quoted me the page and relevant section) said that it was "The Ukraine" that apparently this meant that until the end of time the country is to be called The Ukraine in the English speaking world. I thought it was a really odd argument to make as most Ukrainians will insist on not using the "The" when referring to their country if they can speak English, but it just goes to show you how old habits die hard.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        > The rule is that when it was part of the Soviet Union and a specific region, it was OK to call it "The Ukraine"

        I wonder when The Bronx was part of the Soviet Union...

      • by LMariachi (86077)

        As with Burma, it's not up to them what our name for their country is. Germany doesn't demand that we call it "Deutschland," and it would be broadly mocked if it tried.

        • by CRCulver (715279)
          While is indeed up to you what to call a place, that doesn't mean that pressure to use the name they desire won't suceed. For example, after Cote d'Ivoire announced that it wants this name used in all English-language contexts (superseding "Ivory Coast"), the new name caught on pretty quickly in the press and among educated speakers with a minimum of "mockery". Also, one can note how "Torino" has ousted "Turin" except for a few set phrases (e.g. "Shroud of Turin").
          • by tehcyder (746570)

            Also, one can note how "Torino" has ousted "Turin" except for a few set phrases (e.g. "Shroud of Turin").

            No it hasn't, at least in the UK. I watched the Juventus game on TV last night, and everyone said they came from Turin. If they had said Torino, it would have confused everyone. The fact that most commentators here pronounce the team "Jew-ventus" is amusing, but it's up to us to decide, not the Italians.

      • by Trogre (513942)

        Can we now refer to old Holland as simply Netherlands?

    • Who cares? I certainly don't.

  • by bmacs27 (1314285) on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @02:37PM (#42874519)
    To the Hong Kong Demonoid.
  • the ukraine is weak

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I come from Ukraine. You not say Ukraine weak.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Yeah, well we're playing a game here, pal.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @02:45PM (#42874617)

    The owner relinquished all of the seeder IP addresses, etc.

    Why go to a tracker site that will rat you out?

    • by Charliemopps (1157495) on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @04:36PM (#42875623)

      The seeders IP address were public knowledge. The entire point of the tracker is to release the seeders IP addresses. I have no problem with this. If there are users on there that want to hide what they are doing there are much better ways to go about it. If you're involved in this sort of thing, you've got to assume the industry is going to find out the IP address you hosted from. Best make sure that IP address doesn't lead back to you.

  • Ukrainian Justice (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @02:46PM (#42874639)
    I can speak Russian rather well (not really good at Ukrainian though) and I've spent a decent amount of time in Ukraine and I have a few friends who live there. I can tell you that justice goes to the highest bidder there at the local level. If the US government wants to bribe a judge, they can get whatever verdict they want. Or if they can convince President Yanukovich that he'll get something back in exchange for sending an "evil pirate" to jail, then his office will just tell the judge what to do. However, if the US just expects the local justice system to act like it would in a western country and they don't bribe or tell the Pres what to do, then anyone facing charges can just bribe the judge himself and get off. It will be interesting to see the outcome, but whatever the verdict is, I have no doubts that it will be completely dishonest and someone will have bribed or cajoled their way into it.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @02:59PM (#42874753)

      So the Ukrainian judiciary system is not that much different from the West's. Both follow the golden rule: he who has the gold makes the rules.

      • by jamstar7 (694492)
        Pretty much, except they're more up front about it. What they don't tell you about the US legal system is, you only get the justice you can afford. It's not blatantly obvious yet.
    • Although I do not doubt that you are correct about Ukranian justice, I must argue that, at least regarding high profile cases, Western justice is not very far from that. The pirate bay farse of a judgement proves how far western justice can bend to political interest, for example.
    • by Hatta (162192)

      It will be interesting to see the outcome, but whatever the verdict is, I have no doubts that it will be completely dishonest and someone will have bribed or cajoled their way into it.

      In other words, it's just like the US?

  • http://demonoid.mk/ [demonoid.mk]

    works pretty good, although I don't like the interface, it has all the goodies, usually released on demonoid.mk / kat.ph / thepiratebay.se all at same time.

    id much rather the original demonoid though

  • THE? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @03:26PM (#42874999)

    So the big part of this story is whether on not there should be a The in front of Ukraine? Nothing about the legality of what's been happening or whether Demoniod will return?

  • with my long blonde hair
    i much prefer the usa jail

  • by tompaulco (629533) on Tuesday February 12, 2013 @06:05PM (#42876359) Homepage Journal
    So they tell you where to find stuff. They don't even host the stuff themselves. What did they book them on? Aiding and abetting? Why isn't the Google CEO in jail?
    • by steelfood (895457)

      Because first, they come for the torrent tracker owners, though nobody speaks up as they do not own torrent trackers.

  • Let's use Arabic and call it Al Ukraine.
  • Panama is somehow involved, too? Hard to believe that the land of fish, trees and butterflies is now involved in the raids within Mexico.

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