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Businesses The Courts

SCO Wants To Destroy Business Records 113

Posted by samzenpus
from the just-when-you-thought-it-was-safe dept.
An anonymous reader writes "SCO, now calling itself TSG, has just filed a motion (Pdf) with the bankruptcy court in Delaware asking it to authorize 'the abandonment, disposal, and/or destruction of certain surplus, obsolete, non-core or burdensome, property, including, without limitation, shelving, convention materials, telecommunications and computer equipment, accounting and sales documents, and business records.'"
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SCO Wants To Destroy Business Records

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  • They're bankrupt (Score:5, Interesting)

    by symbolset (646467) * on Monday February 04, 2013 @08:09AM (#42784593) Journal

    They ought to let us bid on them. I bid five hundred dollars.

    I should think together we could get that number up to a substantial sum to help them be rid of these burdensome records they can no longer afford to store. Who here would chip in a bit to free SCO of this burden? I bet we could rally a sum worthy of the court taking notice, to salvage these valuable historical records from the shredder.

  • Re:They're bankrupt (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 04, 2013 @09:18AM (#42784977)

    Over at Groklaw, PJ said that they would buy them from SCO - we could have a bidding war on our hands here.

  • Re:They're bankrupt (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 04, 2013 @09:26AM (#42785053)

    They ought to let us bid on them. I bid five hundred dollars.

    I should think together we could get that number up to a substantial sum to help them be rid of these burdensome records they can no longer afford to store. Who here would chip in a bit to free SCO of this burden? I bet we could rally a sum worthy of the court taking notice, to salvage these valuable historical records from the shredder.

    Why not start a kickstarter campaign to buy up SCO or whatever they call themselves this week? Then the people who pitch in are share holders or something. Priivy to the sorrid secrets of the company. Someone could be appointed CEO run the company in a crowdsourced manner. Turn it into what it once was. A UNIX (now better Linux) company. Just a thought. Good idea or bad it could work. Crowdsourced company vs the share holder system we have that kicks out employees to help shre holders make profits OR a crowdsourced comapny that is dependent on the community for its support to some degree.

  • Re:What did they do? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by spike1 (675478) on Monday February 04, 2013 @09:31AM (#42785079)

    You have either a terrible memory or you weren't around at the start of this...
    back in about 2003, a Linux distribution by the name of Caldera bought the Unix part of SCO (the other part went on to continue trading under a different name)
    Then. in a moment of utter insanity, they decided to sue IBM under allegations that IBM had included their UNIX "property" in the linux kernel...

    Millions of man hours of searching later. people came up with about 5 lines of code that were so generic it was impossible to copyright them,..

    So, the IBM trial went on and on and dragged other companies into the mess...
    Microsoft "invested" in SCO, presumably to keep the trial going.
    Novell disputed what SCO actually claimed to own...

    Last year (or was it 2011) the novell case finally concluded that SCO didn't own any of the copyrights they were suing IBM over in the first place.
    IBM have yet to countersue, but there's so little of SCO left now it's probably no longer worth it.

  • Re:What did they do? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 04, 2013 @10:14AM (#42785463)

    I worked at Caldera when they bought SCO. I also left a few months after the acquisition. Prior to the SCO purchase, Calera was a fun Linux distribution company. We were doing really great things such as building the first GUI install, incorporating Webmin for a GUI admin utility, and having DRDOS to run all your DOS programs within Linux. They were great times. Then, the acquisition happened. Departments at Caldera began to be dismantled, and senior management replaced. I left, and took note as Ransom Love (who was a great person to work for with a great vision) sold his stake and left. Darl McBride didn't exist at the time, no idea where he came from. However, all the Caldera employees that worked hard to make the distribution what it was at the time left long before the litigation.

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