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Canada Spam The Internet Your Rights Online Politics

Proposed Canadian Anti-Spam Rules Restrict Secret ISP Monitoring 24

Posted by timothy
from the shouldn't-they-call-spam-moose? dept.
New submitter Fnordulicious writes "Although Canada's anti-spam legislation is already in place, the rules to implement it have been under development for more than a year. This weekend the proposed rules from the Department of Industry were published in the Canada Gazette. Kady O'Malley reports on the CBC Inside Politics Blog that Canadian ISPs will not be allowed to secretly monitor activity except in the case that the activity is illegal and represents an 'imminent risk to the security of its network.' In addition, consent would be required for monitoring of legal activities 'that are merely unauthorized or suspicious.'"
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Proposed Canadian Anti-Spam Rules Restrict Secret ISP Monitoring

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  • Yay (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Kinthelt (96845) on Tuesday January 08, 2013 @09:28AM (#42517955) Homepage

    Happy news, for a change!

    Now, if we could only do something about the Copyright Modernization Act...

  • by Lieutenant_Dan (583843) on Tuesday January 08, 2013 @09:42AM (#42518151) Homepage Journal


    Limited exemptions for protecting, upgrading and updating computer networks
    The proposed Regulations include an exemption for telecommunications service providers (TSPs) from the requirement to have consent to install a computer program for the limited purposes of preventing illegal activities that present an imminent risk to the security of its network.

    The proposed Regulations also include an exemption for TSPs from the requirement to have consent to install software on devices across an entire network for update and upgrade purposes.

    Does this mean that Rogers/Bell can start pushing agents/SW on their subscribers computers which in turn allow them to control your access?

    This is pretty messed up.

    They should be within their rights to cut off access to the node. I suppose the TSPs need to have a higher level of assurance that the node is no longer compromised.

  • Re:Yay (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 08, 2013 @10:54AM (#42519171)

    I dunno, they left a loophole you could drive a truck through.

    is illegal and represents an 'imminent risk to the security of its network.' In addition, consent would be required for monitoring of legal activities 'that are merely unauthorized or suspicious.'"

    So, a rubber stamp judge, and a good lawyer to prove that anything that anyone does after a fishing expedition falls into those guidelines.

    I mean, it's a far, far better run at this than the USA, but it seems very, very easy to exploit.

Algol-60 surely must be regarded as the most important programming language yet developed. -- T. Cheatham

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