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McAfee Is Doing a Live Broadcast Tonight 201

Posted by samzenpus
from the it-keeps-getting-better dept.
paysonwelch writes "John McAfee, famed antivirus software pioneer and human rights advocate, today announced that he will host a news conference to ask the world for its protection against the Government of Belize. On his official blog, whoismcafee.com, Mr. McAfee has accused the Belize government of widespread corruption. Because of this, Mr. McAfee feels that he will be in grave danger if he were to be returned to there."
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McAfee Is Doing a Live Broadcast Tonight

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  • by jeffb (2.718) (1189693) on Sunday December 09, 2012 @09:15PM (#42238047)

    Seriously, how long are we going to keep feeding this poor nutcase's attention habit?

  • by Frosty Piss (770223) * on Sunday December 09, 2012 @09:23PM (#42238097)

    John McAfee, famed antivirus software pioneer and human rights advocate...

    I would have worded that slightly differently. Maybe something like this:

    John McAfee, famed antivirus software pioneer, paranoiac, hedonistic designer drug addict, possible crack head, and guy with a really bad dye job...

    Yes... Maybe something like that.

    • You took the words right out of my mouth. Since when is John McAfee a human rights activist? Smells WAY more to me like the guy is a totally out of control ego on a short road to hell. It wouldn't surprise me ONE BIT if he DID piss someone off in Belize. He's exactly 'that guy' that will push something until someone pushes back and then its all the rest of the world's fucking fault because heaven forbid someone inconvenienced the asshole or didn't give him what he wanted. People like this tend to get squash
      • by ultranova (717540)

        It wouldn't surprise me ONE BIT if he DID piss someone off in Belize.

        Or it could be even simpler: his neighbour/enemy turned up dead, he bolted, the police want him for questioning, and now he's making excuses to avoid justice.

        Nothing in this case seems to suggest any kind of corruption on Belize authorities part, so why assume it? McAfee, on the other hand, sure is making everything he possibly can to appear as a criminal on the run.

        • Yeah, of course. I sort of thought that one went without saying. I mean the neighbor he didn't get along with turned up with a bullet in his head, kinda suggestive already. Of course that doesn't mean the officials down there aren't pissed at the guy. I suspect any way you cut it he's pretty much boned, and I figure at some level he did it to himself.
      • by BeanThere (28381)

        So inbetween your barbarous foaming exhortations to violence, can you provide any actual evidence that proves he's done something really wrong/bad to deserve to be the object of violence and to even have due process rights violated?

        • What exhortations to violence? lol. Did you mispost or something? I didn't say a thing about what SHOULD happen. I didn't even say anything about what WILL happen. I just commented on the apparent personality traits of John McAfee, something any average human being is certainly qualified to observe. For the record everyone deserves fair justice. I don't know if he will get it or not, but I in no way shape or form advocate anything else.
      • by BeanThere (28381)

        Is it a crime in any jurisdiction to have an "out of control ego" or is that some vague negative thing you just resort/allude to when you have no evidence someone has done something wrong but still feel like using violence against them?

        Giant Electronic Bra: John McAfee deserves to be killed by corrupt cops
        Q: Why? What's he done wrong?
        Giant Electronic Bra: Why it's obvious, he has an "out of control ego" and is on a "short road to hell".
        Q: But what is his crime?
        Giant Electronic Bra: Like I said, he has an "o

  • thought experiment (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PopeRatzo (965947) on Sunday December 09, 2012 @09:34PM (#42238169) Homepage Journal

    Wouldn't it be funny if this McAfee guy was telling the truth?

    Just because you're weird doesn't mean you're a liar. I'm not saying he's not cuckoo, but stranger things have happened than what McAfee is asserting happened to him.

    I just hope he doesn't get hurt and doesn't hurt anyone. And I hope he's merely delusional.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 09, 2012 @10:50PM (#42238677)

      Living in a corrupt country myself for the last 6 years, I'm inclined to believe at least some of what he says. Growing up in a western country it's very hard to understand how corrupted a place can be without spending significant time there.

      • by Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) on Sunday December 09, 2012 @11:29PM (#42238883)

        This. The rule of law is a very ephemeral thing in much of the world, and you can sit there whining about your rights for as long as it takes you to be dragged out into a back alley and ended. That doesn't mean McAfee is innocent, but I'm a big fan of the "until proven guilty" part of that picture myself.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        It is amazing how little people understand about the way the world works outside of the major countries. To me Mcaffe's fear seems totally reasonable. The guy can be a bit weird at times, but that doesn't make him guilty.

        • It is amazing how little people understand about the way the world works outside of the major countries. To me Mcaffe's fear seems totally reasonable. The guy can be a bit weird at times, but that doesn't make him guilty.

          Yes, but it does make him delusional for thinking that he either lived by some different special rules with different special privileges because HE was from a "first world" country, or equally as delusional thinking he had the power to change a corrupt Banana Republic...

          The man is nuttier that rap crap in a pistachio factory.

          • delusional for thinking that he either lived by some different special rules with different special privileges

            Wow, you REALLY do not get third world countries at all. That is pretty much the definition of a third world country, lots of people living by special rules with different special privileges.

            • Wow, you REALLY do not get third world countries at all.I've lived in several "third world countries", but I never think I can "change" the politics, I play by the rules and pay who needs to be paid.

          • by BeanThere (28381)

            Yes, but it does make him delusional for thinking that he either lived by some different special rules with different special privileges because HE was from a "first world" country

            Due process is not a "special privilege", it's a basic, fundamental human right that should be afforded to all human beings on earth. Due process may not be universally applied, but the principles of due process are universal.

            • Well, you're wrong. If you're in China, due process is a special privilege. Don't believe me? Go to China and join a government protest. See how the President's son gets escorted out by smiling unarmed riot police, while the rest of you mooks get run over with tanks and beaten with bamboo rods? That's because you're not specially privileged.

              You can cry about "fundamental human rights" all you want, but you're still getting fisted by a giant gorilla in a country that doesn't have a special piece of pap

          • by Quila (201335)

            Given a third-world country, this is a perfectly plausible scenario:

            He gets to live there and do whatever the hell he wants. He is above the law. He can do this as long as he keeps the right people happy, and the right bribes flowing. His lawyer was a government official familiar with the bribe system, so he was probably the one advising him on the proper bribes and ass-kissing.

            But then he pisses someone off, forgets a bribe, or one of the officials finds out his bribe is less than others, or something else

      • by BeanThere (28381)

        I grew up in a corrupt third world country so I also have a fair understanding, and agree it gives a different perspective.

        Like the guy or not, being civilized means we believe in the global principles of due process, which means yes, even for people whose personalities we don't like.

      • Most of us live in America so we know.
      • by AdamWill (604569)

        Sigh. Again, people seem to be taking McAfee's description of Belize at face value.

        Tip: don't. It's a former British colony with a by-and-large functional democracy and court system. And he _fricking well chose to live there_, to take advantage of its lax law enforcement regarding taxes and/or drugs. Seems a bit rich to start loudly protesting about said legal system once it stops serving your ends.

    • by linatux (63153)

      Just because you're paranoid, it doesn't mean they aren't out to get you

  • by Gothmolly (148874) on Sunday December 09, 2012 @09:35PM (#42238175)

    A Central American government with widespread corruption? Say it isn't so !

  • must-see TV (Score:4, Interesting)

    by PopeRatzo (965947) on Sunday December 09, 2012 @09:45PM (#42238241) Homepage Journal

    I'm going to pitch a reality show to the networks starring McAfee, Julian Assange and Kim Dotcom.

    The Larry, Moe and Curly of Internet head cases. And each week they travel the world to interview other Internet head cases that are simultaneously heroes and repulsive. Hilarity and pie fights ensue.

    The opening credits are their three faces, arranged side by side in the manner of the famous opening for Three Stooges episodes. Or maybe dress them up like D'Artagnan, Porthos and Aramis. Or Groucho, Harpo and Chico.

    Tell me you wouldn't watch those three lovable knuckleheads get into trouble and adventure. Get some woman to play a Margaret Dumont type character and you've really got a hit on your hands.

    • Re:must-see TV (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Nyder (754090) on Sunday December 09, 2012 @09:54PM (#42238305) Journal

      I'm going to pitch a reality show to the networks starring McAfee, Julian Assange and Kim Dotcom.

      The Larry, Moe and Curly of Internet head cases. ...

      While I can understand calling McAfee a head case, not sure what Julian or Kim have done to be called that.

      • by PopeRatzo (965947)

        While I can understand calling McAfee a head case, not sure what Julian or Kim have done to be called that.

        I meant "head case" as a term of endearment. I'm a big fan of Assange, though I'm not sure I'd want to be his friend. There is much to admire about him.

        Dotcom is a lovable lunk and I had a dear friend in college who was a lot like McAfee.

        I also use "head case" in reference to ego.

    • who would play Athos?

    • by macraig (621737) <[mark.a.craig] [at] [gmail.com]> on Sunday December 09, 2012 @10:40PM (#42238627)

      ... interview other Internet head cases that are simultaneously heroes and repulsive.

      I presume their first guest will be Richard Stallman?

    • by bonehead (6382)

      The Larry, Moe and Curly of Internet head cases. And each week they travel the world to interview other Internet head cases

      So, clearly RMS would be the first guest?

      • by clintp (5169)

        RMS would be the stuffy guy they'd hit with a cream pie in every episode.

    • by antdude (79039)

      I would totally watch it even if it is on cable/satellite. [grin]

  • by Joe_Dragon (2206452) on Sunday December 09, 2012 @09:51PM (#42238279)

    systems running mcafee are in grave danger of ruining slow or crashing.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 09, 2012 @10:01PM (#42238357)

    How's dodging taxes working out for you? USA due process seems pretty good now, right? Maybe even USA jails.

    You know what, fuck you. You didn't want to be here. So fine, you get to stay there, wherever it is. Fuck you.

  • by westlake (615356) on Sunday December 09, 2012 @10:04PM (#42238379)

    Mr. McAfee has accused the Belize government of widespread corruption.

    Says the sixty-seven year old guy who bought an off-shore island retreat for himself, seven barely-of-age sexual playmates, and the chance to fry his brain, and perhaps those of the girls as well, with an unlimited supply of home-brewed psychoactive drugs.

    The guy who escaped to a country

    • by manu0601 (2221348)

      Mr. McAfee has accused the Belize government of widespread corruption.

      Says the sixty-seven year old guy who bought an off-shore island retreat for himself

      Indeed, he did choose to live there, and perhaps corruption was a factor leading to that choice: a wonderful country where you live above the law if you have money. Now things turned wrong, it is time to complain about corruption.

    • by dkleinsc (563838)

      Replying to undo incorrect moderation You're absolutely right.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      Mr. McAfee has accused the Belize government of widespread corruption.

      Says the sixty-seven year old guy who bought an off-shore island retreat for himself, seven barely-of-age sexual playmates, and the chance to fry his brain, and perhaps those of the girls as well, with an unlimited supply of home-brewed psychoactive drugs.

      Since you describe the girls as barely legal they must in fact be legal, so I'm having a hard time finding anything in his actions that justify framing him for murder. (I don't know if that's what happened, but that's his assertion, so it's he talking point.)

  • And this is from a guy on "super perv powder" [gizmodo.com] who "recommended that the most effective way to take a dose is via rectal insertion, a procedure known as "plugging," writing: "Measure your dose, apply a small amount of saliva to just the tip of your middle finger, press it against the dose, insert. Doesn't really hurt as much as it sounds." Yeah, McAfee is so credible.
  • I'm starting to not find this whacko's bizarre behavior interesting. It has nothing to do with technology, just someone with too much money and time on his hands.
  • by asmkm22 (1902712) on Monday December 10, 2012 @12:23AM (#42239173)

    I find it kind of funny how a guy that left America to avoid paying taxes is now hoping to get back in due to (as he claims) being framed for a murder after not paying bribes to the government. Oh, so now you want to pay taxes and get my sympathy? Nice.

    • by BeanThere (28381)

      ??? You do realize that under US taxation law, US citizens are required to pay taxes on income earned globally wherever they are in the world? You can go live in the most remote spot in Antarctica and you are still required to pay your taxes on every cent you earn.

      • That's not actually true. If you live primarily outside of the country and earn income primarily outside the country, you aren't liable for taxes. If your income is earned primarily inside the country--if you work for a USA-based contractor and you're in another country doing the work--you pay taxes. Sometimes. It really depends.
        • I don't believe that's correct; if you are a US citizen, live outside the US and work outside the US, you are still liable to pay US taxes. Now, there is a fairly generous exclusion you can claim that, for most people, will completely nullify their tax obligation. But if you earn enough money (for 2011, the amount was US$92,900), you will still be liable for taxes on the marginal amount above the exclusion.

          It's called the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion.

          • It's actually about $15,000 higher than that, because you can take a housing deduction amounting to 16% of the maximum exclusion, which this year is $95,000, or your actual housing expenses if higher. If you make under $95k and you're present in a non-US country 330 days of the year, you're tax-exempt. If you make over $95k you theoretically pay taxes; but really you just file the minimum $15k deduction, giving you up to $110k tax-free. If you make more than that, you set up a foreign shell corporation.
      • by grumpyman (849537)
        It's fair deal. So by renouncing citizenship, one does not need to pay US tax, but on the same token, can't go knock on the door of US embassy for help.
  • by rollingcalf (605357) on Monday December 10, 2012 @12:45AM (#42239299)

    Guatemala wants to deport him to Belize, but he is a US citizen. Instead of trying to stay in Guatemala, I would think he has a better chance of convincing them to return him to the US (at his expense, due to the greater distance compared to Belize) than of being allowed to stay in Guatemala.

    But I see no sign that he's trying to go back to the US. Did he surrender his US citizenship?

    • by SuperKendall (25149) on Monday December 10, 2012 @03:10AM (#42239869)

      Guatemala wants to deport him to Belize, but he is a US citizen.

      Right here you know something fishy is up.

      Guatemala has no extradition treaty with Belize. The fact that he is an American citizen means that automatically, that is where he should be sent when deported, he has no say in the matter since he has entered the country illegally.

      Being deported to Belize means someone, or many someones are being paid off by Belize.

      Unfortunately for McAffee, he's been deemed wacky enough that the U.S. government seems unlikely to try and help him, even though he'll probably be killed if sent to Belize.

      Fortunately for McAffee, he has a lot of money (apparently). The delay you see in deportation is probably the attempt to get him to out-bid Belize.

      • by jonbryce (703250)

        He is being deported because he is in Guatemala illegally, not because Belize wants him, so extradition treaties aren't relevant here.

        If US border patrols see someone crossing the border from Mexico illegally, I guess they send them straight back. They don't check their passport first, or if they do check their passport, it is to confirm that the crossing was illegal, not to determine where to send them back to.

        • If US border patrols see someone crossing the border from Mexico illegally, I guess they send them straight back.

          And if the U.S. border patrol caught an illegal immigrant from Mexico near the Canadian border, would they send him to Canada? I don't think so. People being deported go back to country of origin.

      • by westlake (615356)

        Guatemala has no extradition treaty with Belize. The fact that he is an American citizen means that automatically, that is where he should be sent when deported, he has no say in the matter since he has entered the country illegally.

        Since when is an extradition treaty required to return a fugitive from Belize to Belize?

        Belize has a broadly worded "mutual legal assistance" treaty with the U.S. It doesn't have to charge McAfee with a crime before demanding his return. It only has to show that hos testimony is needed and relevant to a a criminal investigation.

        • Since when is an extradition treaty required to return a fugitive from Belize to Belize?

          When he's not a citizen of Belize. Then all you can do normally is return the person to the country they have a passport for.

          If I flew to Belize, and snuck into Guatemala I assure you I would not be sent to Belize, I would be deported to the U.S.

    • If he returns to the US, he has to stand trial for all US crimes he's violated. Sex with an underaged (under 18) person (even if local law says younger is age-of-consent), use of illegal substances, anything that violates US federal statutes.
      • by PCM2 (4486)

        If he returns to the US, he has to stand trial for all US crimes he's violated. Sex with an underaged (under 18) person (even if local law says younger is age-of-consent), use of illegal substances, anything that violates US federal statutes.

        Don't be ridiculous. Have you never left the country, ever? Immigration and customs does not ask you whether you have ever used drugs or how old the people you've slept with are. If McAfee has been convicted of serious crimes in foreign countries there may be problems, and if he's wanted by law enforcement in other countries he may be arrested in the US, but only to be turned over to those authorities to stand trial. There is no retroactive "things you may have done in some country, at some time in your lif

    • by PCM2 (4486)

      But I see no sign that he's trying to go back to the US. Did he surrender his US citizenship?

      It's been reported in news stories and by McAfee himself [whoismcafee.com] that he spoke with the American embassy in Guatemala about returning to the US. They said they wouldn't help him. Presumably something about respecting the sovereignty of both Guatemala and Belize, and the right of each to enforce its own laws on people within its own borders.

  • by Arancaytar (966377) <arancaytar.ilyaran@gmail.com> on Monday December 10, 2012 @02:20AM (#42239695) Homepage

    He's not a murderer and methcook. He's just a victim of circumstance and government conspiracy just like Hans fucking Reiser.

    Who edits this crap?

    • a victim of the circumstance of murdering his wife, making an ass of himself, then finally accepting a sentencing bargain and leading prosecutors to where he buried the body?
  • I only find comments about people hating him without any legit reason, just like Assange. Come on, they are trying to help the population against the business-controlled government who try to take control over everything, let's help them please.

"The eleventh commandment was `Thou Shalt Compute' or `Thou Shalt Not Compute' -- I forget which." -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982

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