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Censorship Media United Kingdom

The Promo Bay Blocked By UK ISPs 132

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the culture-police dept.
hypnosec writes "The Pirate Bay's artist promotion platform (the Promo Bay), despite being perfectly legal, is being blocked by several UK Internet service providers including BT, and Virgin Media. The Promo Bay was launched this week as a promotion platform for content creators like filmmakers and musicians enabling them to showcase their talent and work to thousands of people across the web. Even though the idea is novel, The Promo Bay has somehow found itself on a block list alongside the Pirate Bay."
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The Promo Bay Blocked By UK ISPs

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  • by hubang (692671) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @02:05PM (#42162049)
    If you were confused by the Napster saga, the big media companies only care about squashing competition. Napster helped their bottom line. ANd taking it down hurt their bottom line. It wasn't about infringement, anymore than the radio is about infringement.

    It's about control.

    If this succeeds, they're unnecessary. They are the gate keepers. An artist needs them. But they don't need artists. They can take any dancer or model who can't sing and turn them into a pop star.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 02, 2012 @02:09PM (#42162077)

    lol. you're naive. Looks like you never actually read an ISP contract. The only thing guaranteed in it is that you pay the ISP. Everything else is at the discretion of the ISP.

  • by troll -1 (956834) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @02:14PM (#42162099)
    It seems like anything that even remotely challenges today's established copyright dogma is the modern day equivalent of blasphemy that deserves absolute censorship so the old fashioned doctrine of intellectual property can be allowed to continue, unchallenged by more futuristic ideas.
  • The Puppy Bay (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ohnocitizen (1951674) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @02:32PM (#42162213)
    UK ISPs would block any effort by the Pirate Bay, even if they launched the Puppy Bay. Its about the source, not the content. The Promo Bay is essentially a PR tool for the Pirate Bay, and blocking that ability is as strategically important to Big Content (and their allies) as blocking actual sharing.

    This sets a rather curious precedent, I wonder how much further they might take it?
  • Re:The Puppy Bay (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Jessified (1150003) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @03:43PM (#42162599)

    Aw so now the UK censors speech based on the speaker, rather than the speech.

  • motives (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PopeRatzo (965947) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @03:44PM (#42162605) Homepage Journal

    This pretty much proves that the MPAA/RIAA is not so much about "piracy" as about maintaining control over an industry.

    There no longer is a need for big record labels, and very soon there will no longer be a need for the big Hollywood conglomerates. If you look at many of the biggest blockbuster movies, once you get past the first screen for "Dreamworks" or "Universal" or "Fox" you find that the actual work (including the funding) was done independently for the most part.

    For now, the big labels and studios are like aging crime bosses that still get their cut from everything that happens in their respective industries. But their day is coming to an end.

    The only question now is whether the most successful indie labels and film production houses are going to try to use the same obsolete business model of consolidation or if they're sufficiently enlightened.

    Either way, The Pirate Bay (and others) presents the best reason why they need to change how they do business.

    Same thing with games: This week, Ubisoft released Far Cry 3 in Europe (it doesn't come out until Dec 4 in the US). Their "uplay" DRM server immediately crashed, making the game unplayable for all the people who legally bought the game, even for the single-player campaign. Meanwhile, those who downloaded the RELOADED release from Pirate Bay had no problem playing their game, whether they were in the EU or US. And still they don't get the hint. Instead of realizing that their DRM was nothing but punishment for their paying customers, Ubisoft probably came away thinking, "We need more better DRM!@!".

  • Re:motives (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Nyder (754090) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @03:59PM (#42162693) Journal

    ...>

    Same thing with games: This week, Ubisoft released Far Cry 3 in Europe (it doesn't come out until Dec 4 in the US). Their "uplay" DRM server immediately crashed, making the game unplayable for all the people who legally bought the game, even for the single-player campaign. Meanwhile, those who downloaded the RELOADED release from Pirate Bay had no problem playing their game, whether they were in the EU or US. And still they don't get the hint. Instead of realizing that their DRM was nothing but punishment for their paying customers, Ubisoft probably came away thinking, "We need more better DRM!@!".

    I've been playing Farcry 3 here in the U.S. for a week now. DRM has failed, it doesn't keep it out of the hands of anyone but paying customers.

  • by nurb432 (527695) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @06:31PM (#42163713) Homepage Journal

    Any ISP can block any traffic for any reason.. We best get used to it, it will only get worse.

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