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Firefox Mozilla Privacy News

Firefox 20 Will Finally Fix Private Browsing Mode 186

Posted by Soulskill
from the we-know-what-you-use-it-for dept.
darthcamaro writes "Unlike every other major browser vendor, Mozilla today does not allow users to have their private mode browser window open at the same time as a regular browser window. That's now set to change. This is a flaw that has been in Bugzilla since 2008 and has been the subject of heated discussion for years."
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Firefox 20 Will Finally Fix Private Browsing Mode

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  • by crow (16139) on Friday November 30, 2012 @07:42PM (#42149807) Homepage Journal

    Private mode tabs should have a different theme or color for the browser portion above the web page so that it's obvious that it's different. There's no need to force them into a different window.

  • by Rhaban (987410) on Friday November 30, 2012 @07:50PM (#42149917)

    That's how it works in opera: anonymous tabs not windows (but you can put the tab in a separate window if you want to).

    As a web developper, I often use this to have several sessions with different users on the same website.

  • by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Friday November 30, 2012 @08:12PM (#42150159)

    Firefox has supported multiple simultaneous sessions since at least the 3.x days.

    Use these command-line options:

        -ProfileManager -new-instance

    Then create as many different profiles as you want. They will all have their own history, bookmarks, add-ons, cookies, etc. The only place you have to worry about cross-profile pollution is with plugins like flash that keep state (like flash-cookies) in their own directory rather than under the firefox profile directory.

    I have about 8 different profiles - one for gmail, one for my bank, one for slashdot, one for IMDB, etc and I keep a special "anonymous" profile that is basically a private-mode session, it wipes everything on exit, cookies, disk cache, history, etc. I even use the "User Agent Switcher" add-on so that each profile pretends to be a slightly different version of Firefox to make browser fingerprinting a little bit harder.

  • by calzones (890942) on Friday November 30, 2012 @08:21PM (#42150247)

    Reminds me how I've wished for a new http "undo" feature.

    Basically, if I make a request of a page from a server and decide it was a mistake, I want to invoke "undo" and have my browser history go back, wipe any cookies or history or cache trace, plus delete anything downloaded... AND THEN ALSO send an "undo" header to Apache to request wiping my visit from the logs.

    Of course that would be open to abuse. So servers should only honor such "undo" requests if they happen within X seconds (say, 120) after the last non-ajax bit was sent to the browser, and as long as no further requests are made by the browser after the first one. For example, click a link on the page, interact with a form widget, or invoke a new ajax request... and you'd totally kill the ability to "undo".

  • Window Drag Handle (Score:4, Interesting)

    by darkain (749283) on Friday November 30, 2012 @09:05PM (#42150745) Homepage

    I'm still waiting for the window drag handle to be the entire "glass" area at the top, and not just the top X% of it. Ever since Windows Vista/7, Microsoft has made it a defacto standard that any part of a window that is "glass" is a drag handle, and Chrome does this nicely. It is very annoying to not have a visual indicator of where the drag handle starts/stops, and more annoying to have that empty glass space become more or less "useless" if the browser isn't full of a million tabs.

  • by calzones (890942) on Friday November 30, 2012 @10:01PM (#42151189)

    Actually, as a web guy, I also care about logs that are free from false positives due to accidental clicks and redirects. A feature like this would help me verify that traffic to a page on the site is purposeful and desired by the end user.

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