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Confidential Police Documents Found In Confetti At Macy's Parade 180

Posted by samzenpus
from the putting-it-all-together dept.
cstacy writes "The Nassau County (New York) Police Department is 'very concerned' about reports that shreds of police documents (with social security numbers, phone numbers, addresses, license plate numbers, incident reports, and more) rained down as confetti in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. The documents also unveiled the identities of undercover officers, including their SSNs and bank information, according to WPIX-TV. Macy's has no idea how this happened, as they use commercial, colored confetti, not shredded paper."
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Confidential Police Documents Found In Confetti At Macy's Parade

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  • How to shred (Score:5, Informative)

    by Nefarious Wheel (628136) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:10AM (#42090971) Journal

    I think you'd need to ensure your sensitive documents were pulped, rather than simply shredded. Much harder to piece together paper machet'

    • Re:How to shred (Score:5, Interesting)

      by K. S. Kyosuke (729550) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:13AM (#42090989)

      I think you'd need to ensure your sensitive documents were pulped, rather than simply shredded. Much harder to piece together paper machet'

      Or just feed the paper into the incinerator in the basement that helps to heat your building.

      • Re:How to shred (Score:5, Informative)

        by whoever57 (658626) on Monday November 26, 2012 @02:40AM (#42091569) Journal

        Or just feed the paper into the incinerator in the basement that helps to heat your building.

        It is surprisingly difficult to burn large quantities of office-quality paper and ensure that nothing is left except ashes.

        • Re:How to shred (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 26, 2012 @02:54AM (#42091639)

          Or just feed the paper into the incinerator in the basement that helps to heat your building.

          It is surprisingly difficult to burn large quantities of office-quality paper and ensure that nothing is left except ashes.

          Which is why such documents are shredded and then incinerated. I used to work for a bank, there's nothing difficult about it at all. The only thing people should take away from this article is that shredding documents really doesn't do much (if anything) to keep your data private.

          • by Bigby (659157)

            It does wonders when your information isn't worth much. It is like having a lock on your crappy car. Why would someone steal it when there are so many better locked cars or flat out unlocked cars available nearby?

            Security is relative.

        • If you shred it and let it flutter down in to the incinerator it would probably burn quite vigorously.

        • Blend the ashes in water. Cross shredded, burnt and pulped in water. No one is recovering that.

          • Re:How to shred (Score:5, Insightful)

            by craigminah (1885846) on Monday November 26, 2012 @07:58AM (#42092729)
            Looking at the size and length of the shredded documents, it looks like the police used a $29 home shredder from Staples. They should spend a few more dollars and get a shredder that can reduce their paper to dust or at least small bits instead of long strips.
            • Also it would make far, far more sense to shred everything into horizontal strips. What's the point in shredding at all if you shred neatly into readable lines?

              • vertical*

                Obviously.

                Argh.

                • 1979 called and said that vertical strips are not good enough for shredding an embassy's secret documents either.
                  Apparently it did take a few months to reassemble all the shredded paperwork in Tehran though so it's still a bit more than a "keep out" sign designed to stop the honest.
                • Re:How to shred (Score:5, Informative)

                  by gstoddart (321705) on Monday November 26, 2012 @10:20AM (#42093485) Homepage

                  But that won't cover stuff printed in portrait format. Shredding in only one direction is a bad idea.

                  Hell, my home shredder, like most of them nowadays, is a cross shredder, which means it's cutting in both directions at once. That ends up making fairly small confetti-like pieces.

            • by Sentrion (964745) on Monday November 26, 2012 @10:56AM (#42093763)

              ...They should spend a few more dollars and get a shredder that can reduce their paper to dust or at least small bits instead of long strips.

              You must be one of those tax-and-spend liberals. The solution is to shutdown the police department, reduce firearm regulations, and allow the invisible hand of the free market to decide who can get away with crime.

            • by danomac (1032160)

              Or, given that they're the police, have a portable service come and shred the paper down to pulp. There are truck fleets designed to do this.

          • Or, shred the documents, slather them in peanut butter, feed them to goats, feed the goats to lions, slaughter the lions, grind them into meatballs, cook them over an open flame, feed those meatballs to a tapeworm, then put the tapeworm through the shredder and repeat.

            I'm being sarcastic, a shredder is adequate for even the most sensitive documents. These shredders are are the NSA's Evaluated Product List: https://www.semshred.com/level_6_shredders [semshred.com]
        • Re:How to shred (Score:4, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 26, 2012 @04:33AM (#42091993)

          Some idiot kid incinerated our plastic trash cans. Ordinary trash and recycleable trash cans burnt down to the wheels. The paper trash can was only burnt one third down, and the paper itself stacked/compressed inside rather compactly was mostly untouched. I suppose that the problem is getting the oxygen where it counts.

          • Precisely.

            Some of us old timers remember when we heated with wood and/or coal furnaces. You could have all the fuel you wanted, you could have a nice draft going through the firebox - and the fire would still burn out if not tended occasionally. You needed to grab the shaker handle, give it a couple good shakes to knock the ashes into the ash bin, then open the door and poke the mass of smouldering stuff in the firebox. Depending on conditions, you may or may not throw another log, or another chunk of co

    • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:34AM (#42091069) Journal

      I think you'd need to ensure your sensitive documents were pulped, rather than simply shredded. Much harder to piece together paper machet'

      It's a question of volume. Once you start shoving serious quantities of paper, you should really look into sending all your printers and copiers to law school, and retooling the UIs and print drivers so that all printing automatically takes place in the context of attorney-client privilege.

      Thanks to the magic of inexpensive ethernet-attached printers and online degree mills, all the printers that the C-levels and above use are doctors as well as lawyers, and we imported a HIPPApotamus to guard the filing cabinets. It doesn't get more secure than that!

      • we imported a HIPPApotamus...!

        That's HIPAApotamus - as in Health Information Portability and Accountability Act

        By the way, why you were modded as "Interesting" instead of "Funny" is beyond me.

        • That's what surprised me. I assumed that the assertion that we'd provided our printers with law degrees would be absurd on its face. Maybe slashdot knows something about the falling admissions standards of degree mills that I don't.

          (though, in theory, a multifunction printer whose postscript interpreter has access to scanned documents should, probably with a major RAM upgrade, be capable of taking a bar exam if sent an appropriately structured postscript file...)

    • by lsllll (830002) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:40AM (#42091099)
      Cross Shredder
    • Re:How to shred (Score:4, Informative)

      by jonwil (467024) on Monday November 26, 2012 @03:15AM (#42091723)

      The best answer is to shred the documents with a proper cross-cut shredder, pulp the shreds and then recycle the pulp into new paper things.
      And its good for the environment too :)

    • by Hentes (2461350)

      Ideally, the police would adopt this new tech called computer and stop using paper altogether.

      • by Sentrion (964745)

        Can't. The dept. hasn't had room in the budget for a computer since 1975. And what with viruses and hackers and too many idiots who don't understand cyber security, using a computer would lead to even bigger leaks of secret information.

  • We still do this? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:11AM (#42090979)

    Throw crap all over to celebrate what.... yay we're job creators! someone has to pick all this shit up!

  • by angel'o'sphere (80593) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:12AM (#42090981) Homepage Journal

    Or just a cheap way of deposing old paper(s)?

    • by johnnyb (4816)

      "Yes, those documents have been securely destroyed". It's good to know that it isn't just IT that does security theater.

  • I call BS on this (Score:5, Insightful)

    by multiben (1916126) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:19AM (#42091009)
    First of all, I believe Macy's on this. Why would you try to save a few bucks by using recycled documents? They're not a pet store. Secondly, confetti is usually pretty small, so who was walking around piecing tiny bits of paper together in the middle of the parade? I guess it's possible but the whole thing just smells like your standard internet myth.
    • Re:I call BS on this (Score:5, Interesting)

      by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:29AM (#42091049) Journal

      Unless the evidence just *magically* disappears from the hands of the people who collected it and took pictures at the parade, we pretty much have to accept that shredded documents did end up getting tossed around like confetti.

      That done, we get into the question of where in the chain from NYPD filing cabinet to document disposal company to recycler, to party supplier some deeply underprocessed documents made it into the final product...

      Does NYPD not even cross-cut onsite? Fuck, my workplace does that(paper, HDD, and tape) and we don't exactly have people who infiltrate the mob for a living. Did the 'secure document lifecycle solutions' vendor cut some serious corners? Is there a bulk confetti supplier who is cutting the product with material from the shred stream in order to lower processing costs?

      • by alen (225700)

        Nassau county police is not the nypd

      • by guruevi (827432) <evi@smo k i n g c ube.be> on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:58AM (#42091171) Homepage

        You really think the 'commercial' document shredder companies do what they say? No, they take the paper or hard disks or whatever off your hands and now your manager has a false sense of security.

        What does the shredder company do: they try to make money on both ends. Selling large amounts of recycled paper as confetti paper is a pretty good deal as a) they get paid for it and b) the confetti company doesn't have to pay for brand new paper.

        Do you really think the hard disks you gave them will get shredded as they say? No, it will get taken apart and the individual pieces (rare earth magnets, platters etc.) will get recycled wherever it is cheapest.

        • by multiben (1916126)
          Sure, and the so called "government" also puts mind control drugs into the water supply.
        • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Monday November 26, 2012 @01:51AM (#42091393) Journal

          You really think the 'commercial' document shredder companies do what they say? No, they take the paper or hard disks or whatever off your hands and now your manager has a false sense of security.

          What does the shredder company do: they try to make money on both ends. Selling large amounts of recycled paper as confetti paper is a pretty good deal as a) they get paid for it and b) the confetti company doesn't have to pay for brand new paper.

          Do you really think the hard disks you gave them will get shredded as they say? No, it will get taken apart and the individual pieces (rare earth magnets, platters etc.) will get recycled wherever it is cheapest.

          I'm pretty sure that the ones who bring containerized/tractor-trailer-installed shredders to your site and allow you to watch the sweet, sweet, destruction are probably not lying, since they have little ability to resist trivial inspection. Anybody else, for reasons totally unrelated to having to do real work, rather than 'ensuring secure document lifecycle management' by watching huge shredders get their shred on, I heartily distrust.

          • by Inda (580031)
            The trucks that collect our paper shred in on the back on the truck. Paper goes in one hole. A window allows viewing of the churned dead trees.

            Just saying.
            • by Culture20 (968837)
              Be sure to toss some colored paper in to make sure.
              • Re:I call BS on this (Score:4, Informative)

                by Sentrion (964745) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:05PM (#42094405)

                Good point. It's all too easy to spin pre-shredded documents to look like your docs are being shredded when the real docs are being transferred to a safe storage box to sell to corporate spies and ID theives. A document scanner could also just as easily be installed between the feeder and the cutting blades to record data milliseconds before shredding. Printers and copiers are a major security concern as well since most of today's models will save digital copies of recently printed documents in onboard memory. If you have secrets worth shredding it's probably best not to outsource the task to a guy with a truck earning minimum wage. Same goes to outsourcing your IT department.

                • by Culture20 (968837)

                  It's all too easy to spin pre-shredded documents to look like your docs are being shredded when the real docs are being transferred to a safe storage box to sell to corporate spies and ID theives

                  That's why I mentioned interleaving colored paper.

                  A document scanner could also just as easily be installed between the feeder and the cutting blades to record data milliseconds before shredding.

                  Good catch. Didn't think of that. So essentially do the same thing we do with unwipeable HDDs: disassemble and destroy platters & solid state cache in-house. (ie shred and burn paper in-house)

        • "hard disks you gave them will get shredded as they say? No, it will get taken apart" Nope, they will get sold on Ebay in one piece.
        • Around here they have shredder trucks that drive around the office buildings once every so often. They have a big bin that pops out on the side, and they have you dump your own documents/items in so they don't have to touch them. Then, there is a viewing window on the back so you can see the piles of ~1cm x ~1cm bits that come out from whatever you just threw in. Unless they're using misdirection and mirrors, I think that's pretty secure.

          I honestly don't know what they do with the bits, but several building

        • Our shredder comes with a truck that shreds it on-site. He collects the paper from locked bins we put it in, takes it out, puts it on this lift and we can watch it get shredded right there. It's not the cheapo kind of shredding you'd do in your home either, it's more like a giant grinder. Then they supposedly take it back to be burned somewhere... I guess we can't be sure they actually do that part. It's a very popular service around here.
      • by raehl (609729) <[moc.oohay] [ta] [113lhear]> on Monday November 26, 2012 @01:15AM (#42091221) Homepage

        Shredding paper reduces average paper fiber length and thus also reduces the value of the paper as a recycled material. Also makes the paper take up more volume in transport. Additionally, if you don't trust your recycler to securely handle your intact paper, shredding the paper before you give it to them is a minimal improvement for the same reason shredding the paper before throwing it all over new york city wasn't very secure, and there was far more randomization there than shredding paper into a bucket.

        So there's significant practical reasons to not shred the paper before shipping it out - increases costs, reduces value, minimal security improvement.

      • by mlts (1038732) *

        It must not be a good shred job if the stuff can be easily put back together.

        Consumer level shredders can just use strips about 3/8 of an inch wide. Next level up are some crosscuts which can 1 1/2 inches. From there, you get 1/8" wide cuts of varying crosscuts.

        For serious shredding, you get a level 4-6 shredder, or at least a FACTA-compliant one. Those put out pieces small enough that they are more of the size of large glitter, not confetti.

        I'm dubious about this too. Most government (city/state/Federa

        • Re:I call BS on this (Score:5, Informative)

          by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Monday November 26, 2012 @01:55AM (#42091407) Journal

          TFA is entirely worthless; but the stuff showing up on Google images for this little fiasco shows strip-cut material that hasn't even been fed into the shredder in the correct direction(so the strips tend to include entire lines, rather than mere fragments) unless our dear intertubes are lying, somebody did an atypically bad shredding job, even by the standards of small-business-who-buys-their-shredding-through-staples standards.

    • by PCM2 (4486) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:38AM (#42091091) Homepage

      In addition, I have a cross-cut shredder at my home. I've looked at the bits of paper that come out of it, and it's nigh impossible to get any meaningful information off of them -- certainly not "Pete Jones is an undercover police officer, yes that Pete Jones, the one who buys his cocaine at the Acme Bar, the guy with the weird mustache." And mine is pretty old, too. They have ones that slice and dice the paper much finer than mine.

      So, while I'm not saying it's impossible that somebody picked up some confetti at a parade and realized to their horror that it contained sensitive, confidential information; but if that did in fact happen, it was clearly an intentional act by someone.

      Cue the dramatic organ music... and now let's start talking Occam's Razor. Do we believe this story, really?

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        It was not a cross-cut shredder. The police reports evidently came in "strips."

        See this article [wpix.com].

      • It may not be as hard as you think [slashdot.org].
      • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Monday November 26, 2012 @02:12AM (#42091463)

        Not saying there's any validity to this story (it sounds like BS to me) but you can get shredders that shred to various standards. Fellowes sells shredders that are strip cut, cross cut, and micro cut (more or less makes powder). The reason is because the more intense the cut, the less amount of paper a given size of motor can handle. For example take three of their shredders, all with the same basic build and model number. The strip cut version can do 21 sheets at a time, the cross cut 14, the micro cut 10. Same motor, same general construction, only difference is the blade assembly.

        It has nothing to do with size either. You can find large ones that are strip cut. Fellowes has a 35 sheet strip cut commercial model they sell (costs about $4k). The more you want the paper cut up, the more blades you have to have, thus the more resistance, thus the less it can handle at once.

        As such businesses may choose the higher capacity, but less secure, shredders for some documents. They also cost less to buy.

        That's also why micro cut shredders have never become all that popular. Their cost goes up again because of the more blades and they can't handle a lot at once.

      • There was a DARPA challenge competition just about the feasbility and ability to do this.
        The problem is when they might not shred it well enough or finely enough so that it is unrecoverable. Just look at the DARPA Shredder Challenge [wikipedia.org] to see how much can be recovered from shredded documents. The last challenge involved multiple cross-cut shredded documents mixed together.
        .
        Also, see the movie for another example of the carpet-weaving approach to unshredding strip-shredded documents when you've got enough m [wikipedia.org]
      • by Sique (173459)
        In the last days of the Staatssicherheit of the former East Germany, many documents were shredded, but now they are reconstructed by scanning the remainings and having a semiautomated process searching through the scans and finding fitting parts to reconstruct the original relations - basicly doing a big puzzle. There are online reports [bstu.bund.de] about it, albeit they are in german.
      • by Sulphur (1548251)

        In addition, I have a cross-cut shredder at my home. I've looked at the bits of paper that come out of it, and it's nigh impossible to get any meaningful information off of them -- certainly not "Pete Jones is an undercover police officer, yes that Pete Jones, the one who buys his cocaine at the Acme Bar, the guy with the weird mustache." And mine is pretty old, too. They have ones that slice and dice the paper much finer than mine.

        So, while I'm not saying it's impossible that somebody picked up some confetti at a parade and realized to their horror that it contained sensitive, confidential information; but if that did in fact happen, it was clearly an intentional act by someone.

        Cue the dramatic organ music... and now let's start talking Occam's Razor. Do we believe this story, really?

        This document was shreded by Occam's Razor.

    • by westlake (615356)

      First of all, I believe Macy's on this.

      The three hour parade starts at 77th St and ends at 34th Street.

      8,000 marchers.

      Including ten marching bands

      Clowns. Dancers. Massive floats, outsized, peanut-shaped vehicles and other four-wheeled curiosities.

      2 million pedestrians lining the route.

      I find it hard to believe that shredded bits of paper are going to survive such a trampling in recognizable form. Harder still to believe that anyone could have collected and reassembled enough pieces of the puzzle to make a story like this seem credible.

      Macy's [huffingtonpost.com]

  • Ok, so if the documents were shredded, how was any useful information recovered? The story doesn't say. Hurrah for journalism. Assuming the documents were pieced together, that's a lot of painstaking work by people just standing around. The journalist uses the word "confetti" which does not mean "long strips of paper that were not crosscut shredded". Every shredder I've seen for the last decade has been a crosscut shredder instead of the old style. There's one in this office not ten feet from me that
    • Re:WTH? (Score:4, Informative)

      by PNutts (199112) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:41AM (#42091105)

      The journalist uses the word "confetti" which does not mean "long strips of paper that were not crosscut shredded". Every shredder I've seen for the last decade has been a crosscut shredder instead of the old style. There's one in this office not ten feet from me that does crosscut shredding, and my Dad has one in his office too. These are the ordinary models that anyone can buy. So, were these police documents ribbons instead of confetti? The article doesn't say. Yet another proud day for journalism.

      Also, not a proud day for reading comprehension. TFA states "shredded police documents mixed in with confetti". Other articles have photos and videos of the strips of paper which have complete lines of text.

      • by Animats (122034)

        Every shredder I've seen for the last decade has been a crosscut shredder instead of the old style.

        The shredded paper strips [newsday.com] look like what comes out of the low-end Champion shredder I bought at Office Depot last year. Including the slightly serrated edges. That thing just cuts paper into 8mm strips. As a security device, it's not much.

        (I bought one to use as a paper slitter to make 8mm paper tape to be printed on by antique Model 14 Teletypes. It's not a great paper slitter, but running adding machine rolls though it made enough tape to get the Teletypes working.)

        • Every shredder I've seen for the last decade has been a crosscut shredder instead of the old style.

          The shredded paper strips [newsday.com] look like what comes out of the low-end Champion shredder I bought at Office Depot last year. Including the slightly serrated edges. That thing just cuts paper into 8mm strips. As a security device, it's not much.

          Given the "artistic" layout of the strips in that photo, I'd guess that that was some Newsday photographer's idea of a dramatic reenactment, rather than an actual handful of the strips in question.

  • by arielCo (995647) on Monday November 26, 2012 @12:31AM (#42091063)

    "It landed on her shoulder," Finkelstein said, "and it says 'SSN' and it's written like a Social Security number, and we're like, 'That's really bizarre.'"

    Finkelstein, a Tufts University freshman, said he and his friends were concerned and picked up more confetti that had fallen around them.

    [cynical]
    They were lucky not to be charged for "illegal appropriation of classified government documents" or something like that, like that poor sod who bought a used computer, found kiddie porn in it and duly reported it.
    [/cynical]

  • SO, they didn't destroy the documents, and now they're upset about it. Maybe, just maybe, they need to do a better job of destroying sensitive documents.

  • Come on. Anyone with a shredder knows that even if it isn't very good, you have to really make an effort to put information that would cover several lines of a page together into something that is real. And paper flying through the air isn't one of those ways.
    • If you put a page printed in fine print in landscape, then a lot of text would be legible if put through a strip shredder. Even a cross cut shredder might not be enough to prevent the release of useable data in that case.

      So the problem is a cheap strip shredder somewhere in a police station, and someone treating the shredded paper thoughtlessly.
      (Not that this story might not be false, but it also could be true.)

    • You might remember that the students in Iran did just that after the coup in 1979. They sat down with a few tons of shredded paper and played it like a huge puzzle.

      Sure, it takes a LOT of time and a LOT of work, but you really think the mob has a problem with either?

  • Cheap solutions (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Need a shredder?
    too much trouble to do a requisition and wait 6 months
    go to Wal-Mart
    Buy cheap
    submit 'expense'
    much easier.

    Too lazy to empty the trash into the confidential bag?
    Dump it out the window on the way out the door.

    City will clean it up

    Didn't have to 'walk the donut'

    gain a pound for retirement

  • by ohnocitizen (1951674) on Monday November 26, 2012 @01:37AM (#42091321)
    Was it a Police Officer mad at the department? A criminal who gained access and wanted to undermine the PD? Or was this truly some far fetched accident?
    • by cusco (717999) <<brian.bixby> <at> <gmail.com>> on Monday November 26, 2012 @02:40AM (#42091573)
      More likely simple stupidity. The local public utility district used to shred their documents and give them away to local horse farmers for use as bedding. Someone fed some customer data into the shredder the wrong way, and the stable it went to belonged to a local newspaper editor. Of course it became front page news, now the district has to pay to get stuff shredded and the horse breeders no longer get free bedding.
    • by Shag (3737)

      I'm pondering which villain from Batman would do this sort of thing.

  • by Opportunist (166417) on Monday November 26, 2012 @02:33AM (#42091539)

    Especially if the organizer of the parade claims they use commercial confetti, and bluntly, why shouldn't they, considering that it's one thing less to think about and it most certainly isn't one of the big numbers on the bill.

    Can anyone see a snitch working in the cleaning crew responsible for cleaning out the shredded papers using the parade to hand some info out to his friends? He cannot access sensitive material, of course, and if he took home a few cubic meters of shredded paper someone might wonder what's going on, but grabbing it and dumping it out during the parade, nobody would notice.

    All you need is a man in the cleaning crew for after the parade. Thinking of it ... all you really need to get this rolling is a company specializing in cleaning... Anyone looked into this?

  • Scrap paper (Score:5, Interesting)

    by MichaelSmith (789609) on Monday November 26, 2012 @02:52AM (#42091627) Homepage Journal

    Police in my state got into trouble once for printing out license and registration data and using the printouts as scrap paper in their front office, so if they had to write something down for a member of the public they might get somebody else's details on the back.

  • by girlinatrainingbra (2738457) on Monday November 26, 2012 @03:02AM (#42091661)
    Well, that's what happens when you outsource a significant privacy-related concern to someone outside of your internal domain: they might not shred it well enough or finely enough so that it is unrecoverable. Just look at the DARPA Shredder Challenge [wikipedia.org] to see how much can be recovered from shredded documents.
    Also, see the movie Argo [wikipedia.org] for another example of the carpet-weaving approach to unshredding strip-shredded documents when you've got enough manpower.
  • If I had access to confidential police records, including undercover cops, and wanted to sell it, I might arrange a distribution method such as this.

    It's a good thing that nobody with significant amounts of money has an interest in determining the identities of undercover cops.

  • All these destruction plans ignore the obvious: why did you print it to start with? In my office suite we have ~15 printers and one medium size shredder. I see people print 20 copies of prestentations(in color), then notice an error and reprint the whole thing. People will print a 100-page PDF to skim it one time.
  • Shredding company? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Mr. Freeman (933986) on Monday November 26, 2012 @10:00AM (#42093355)
    Here's my theory:
    NYPD decides, as many businesses do, to contract with an company for shredding. They ship their confidential documents off to this company and they get shredded. This way the NYPD doesn't have to buy a bunch of shredders and deal with internal shredder compliance.

    The company doing the shredding decides that they're going to make an extra couple bucks and sell their shredded documents as "confetti". Someone in the purchasing office for the confetti company isn't looking to closely and makes the purchase. The shredded documents are shipped and then mixed into the confetti.
  • ...by Sarah Stillman [newyorker.com], I've come to the conclusion that cops are basically stupid.

  • Macy's did use confetti. Keep in mind, however, that they are a corporation and a corporation's primary purpose is survival, followed by maximum profit.

    Perhaps the confetti they bought was from the cheapest source, and said source was not verified to be the most reliable one. Oops?

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