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John McAfee Accused of Murder, Wanted By Belize Police 353

Posted by samzenpus
from the bad-stuff dept.
New submitter thn writes "John McAfee, who started the antivirus software giant named after him, has been accused of murder in Belize and is wanted. McAfee had taken to 'posting on a drug-focused Russian message board...about his attempts to purify the psychoactive compounds colloquially known as "bath salts,"' Gizmodo wrote. The scariest aspect of this story may be the fact that an entire lab was constructed for John McAfee's research purposes. Because of his efforts to extract chemicals from natural chemical plans McAfee was able to justify his experiments in a country that is largely unregulated."
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John McAfee Accused of Murder, Wanted By Belize Police

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  • Re:UPDATE (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jellomizer (103300) on Monday November 12, 2012 @05:18PM (#41960181)

    No No you got it wrong. News isn't about fact, it is about making people guilty in the eyes of society so they can be shunned from society, because our normal court system is designed to try to make sure innocent people go free.

  • by NeutronCowboy (896098) on Monday November 12, 2012 @05:18PM (#41960187)

    After actually RTFA'ing the whole thing, and not just the first paragraph, it looks like this might be also a lot about the story of a drug abuser falling prey to some subtle secondary effects of his drug of choice. If he was as keen on experimenting with bath salts and other psychotropic drugs as he seems to be, I fully would expect him to lose it at some point. Who knows if he actually committed the murder - but there's all kinds of other lessons in here.

  • by RabidReindeer (2625839) on Monday November 12, 2012 @05:36PM (#41960359)

    Look, its another person twisting Libertarianism in to something it isn't so it sounds unpleasent to people who don't know any better.

    Looks like you've got your work cut out for you, because what most of my self-described Libertarian friends say would fit right into this stereotype. I.e., indistinguishable from pure anarchy. Basing that on the 2 most of-repeated "Libertarian" maxims:

    A) Government Regulation is Evil. Admittedly if you corner them, you can usually get a self-described Libertarian to confess that there's room for regulation, but when operating on auto-pilot they tend to forget to mention that. There's no clearly-defined ground rules for us outsiders to understand.

    B) Taxes are Theft. Because apparently whatever government functions are admissible under Libertarianism are funded by the fairies. A belief also promoted liberally in recent years by the Conservative crowd who took the "tax" out of tax-and-spend, but not the "spend".

    There's you a starting point. It's up to you to take the ball and run with it. Have fun!

  • by SuperBanana (662181) on Monday November 12, 2012 @05:39PM (#41960385)

    A Gawker Networks site got something wrong?

    In a sensationalist fashion?

    SHOCKING.

    Seriously, why does everyone still put up with those fucktards? Their level of incompetence has crossed from believable to they-must-be-doing-it-on-purpose-for-page-hits.

  • Re:CSI: Belize (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 12, 2012 @05:42PM (#41960411)

    "[...] where they saw 52 year old U.S National Mr. GREGORY VIANT FAULL, of the said address, lying face up in a pool of blood with an apparent gunshot wound on the upper rear part of his head apparently dead."

    They are describing what the police reported seeing upon their arrival: Mr. Faull, lying face up in a pool of blood, with what appeared to be a gunshot wound on the upper rear part of his head, apparently dead when they arrived.

    "Looks on first inspection like a gunshot wound" doesn't necessarily mean it *is* a gunshot wound, and that assessment needs to be confirmed by a coroner. So yes, it was "an apparent gunshot wound."

    "Dead when we arrived," is different than "alive when we arrived, but died en route," and they're both different from "Alive when we arrived, but died 3 days later in the hospital," and "no apparent heartbeat or breathing, but we started CPR and he resuscitated." All of these can be consistent with someone "apparently dead" upon arrival, but not actually dead after further investigation and treatment.

    But you know, I guess it's more important to be a smug twat and demonstrate your lack of reading comprehension than it is to actually learn to read, huh?

  • by Hatta (162192) on Monday November 12, 2012 @06:01PM (#41960579) Journal

    With as many obscenely rich people as there are, why don't we hear more about this type of thing? Is the average hundred millionaire really boring, or are they just better at keeping secrets? If you have a hundred million, why wouldn't you build a sex dungeon?

  • Why? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by biodata (1981610) on Monday November 12, 2012 @06:03PM (#41960595)
    Why might the scariest part of the story be that he built a lab?
  • Re:CSI: Belize (Score:3, Insightful)

    by X0563511 (793323) on Monday November 12, 2012 @06:17PM (#41960781) Homepage Journal

    You don't know the gunshot killed him until the coroner does his thing. He could have already been dead. Hell he might have been dead from natural causes, and the gunshot was just desecration of a corpse.

    There's a big difference between first degree murder and mutilating a corpse. They have to be sure. It's their job to be sure.

  • by lgw (121541) on Monday November 12, 2012 @07:05PM (#41961411) Journal

    A) Government Regulation is Evil. Admittedly if you corner them, you can usually get a self-described Libertarian to confess that there's room for regulation, but when operating on auto-pilot they tend to forget to mention that. There's no clearly-defined ground rules for us outsiders to understand.

    B) Taxes are Theft. Because apparently whatever government functions are admissible under Libertarianism are funded by the fairies. A belief also promoted liberally in recent years by the Conservative crowd who took the "tax" out of tax-and-spend, but not the "spend".

    It's only crazy if you take a geeky "black or white, all or nothing" view of these things - which admittedly many Libartarians do. Regulation is evil and taxes are theft, sure; that;s means we try to solve problems with the least regulation and taxation that actually solves the problem. That's quite a bit of taxes and regulation, actually. But seeking a solution that minimizes both, out of many possible solutions, is still a valid goal.

  • by Keen Anthony (762006) on Monday November 12, 2012 @08:59PM (#41962379)

    Calm down everyone. You're all confusing three distinct phenomena: classic libertarianism, an inconsequential modern political third party, and the contemporary mainstream Randian wannabe sociopolitical movement of the same name that at best is nothing more than a reactionary coalition of political, social, and civic amateurs, some of which are actual liberal pro-legalization college kids that think they are brilliant scholars because they got an A in poli-sci and soc, and in-fact sociopolitical conservative moralists that are anti-tax because they either fear their money going to welfare or are borderline confederacy-seeking states rightists that want a Fed so small they can drown it in a bathtub. Add in a dash of actual anarcho-capitalist industrialists and entrepreneurs and crazed gold standard pushers of alternative currencies for flavor. By and large, the libertarian movement as it is popularized today is a caricature of the original libertarian movement, but populated by low information people that don't read enough, that get all their news from pundits, and who only recently in the last 8 years have taken a real interest in domestic policy and macroeconomics. To put it simply, they don't know what they don't know.

    To put it another way, I have recently in the last decade taken a refreshed interest in physics after sleep walking through it as a student and a professional. But, much of my new learning comes from advocacy sources like Michio Kaku. I enjoy doing fun things with magnets and lasers. My teleportation machine is awesome, but I assure you, none of you should use it no matter how much I tell you I've worked out all the kinks because I'm a physics tourist and my input should be taken as if it came from an enthusiastic child that still believes in Santa.

"I got everybody to pay up front...then I blew up their planet." "Now why didn't I think of that?" -- Post Bros. Comics

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