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Skype Hands Teenager's Information To Private Firm 214

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the but-we-were-friends dept.
New submitter andrew3 writes "Skype has allegedly handed the information of a 16-year-old boy to a security firm. The information was later handed over to Dutch law enforcement. No court order was served for the disclosure. The teenager was suspected of being part of a DDoS packet flood as a part of the Anonymous 'Operation Payback'." According to the article, Skype voluntarily disclosed the information to the third party firm without any kind of police order, possibly violating a few privacy laws and their own policies.
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Skype Hands Teenager's Information To Private Firm

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  • by Inf0phreak (627499) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @04:34AM (#41891257)
    Yes. People would do well to read Bob the Angry Flower's guide to the apostrophe... you idiots [angryflower.com]!
  • Re:Another win (Score:5, Informative)

    by man_of_mr_e (217855) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @04:38AM (#41891279)

    What does this have to do with Skype being proprietary? An open source company could just as easily handed information over, assuming they ran a service which required payment.

    In any event, if you read the article.. It turns out that the security firm was employed by both paypal and Skype, which would mean that the firm would fall under each companies privacy policies and would be allowed to access the data legally.

    The security company, however, should not have given the information to the police without an order, although it's a bit fuzzy as to whether they are legally bound by the privacy policy of their employer.

  • by blind biker (1066130) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @05:08AM (#41891409) Journal

    I see your BTAF's guide to the apostrophe and raise you one Oatmeal guide to using the apostrophe. [theoatmeal.com]

  • by YttriumOxide (837412) <<yttriumox> <at> <gmail.com>> on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @05:33AM (#41891495) Homepage Journal

    Why do have so many people problems accepting there are non-native English speakers? It's not difficult.

    Actually, as a native English speaker living in Germany, I find Germans make these kinds of errors significantly less than native English speakers.

    Germans make a lot of other mistakes in grammar, spelling and so on (including some hilarious mistranslations when they think in German and speak English); but things like the apostrophe rules don't seem to be as much of a problem for them (or at least, far easier than me dealing with German comma rules...).

  • Re:Another win (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @05:47AM (#41891545)

    In any event, if you read the article.. It turns out that the security firm was employed by both paypal and Skype, which would mean that the firm would fall under each companies privacy policies and would be allowed to access the data legally.

    No.
    This violates EU Privacy law. Privacy law requires a specific purpose, it is not legal to say that "we share your personal data with third parties" in a contract: the parties must be specified. This is especially the case for terms and conditions documents*.

    * I'm not sure if this distincition exists in American or even European law, but in Dutch consumer law (where it is referred to as "Algemene Voowaarden", literally translating to 'general conditions': these are the typical EULA/I-bought-something-in-the-store type documents that no-one actually reads), there is an additional blacklist (and "greylist") of terms and conditions that are declared dubious. Such terms include stripping customers of certain rights.

  • by GeekWithAKnife (2717871) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @05:53AM (#41891569)

    Why do people have so many problem's with apostrophe's? Its not difficult.

    Since we're nit picking...I wanted to illustrate how easy it really is.

    Sure, the vast majority of English speakers are unable to make proper use of the apostrophe at all times, but who cares? it's not difficult!

    Just follow these not difficult rules, like everyone else:

    Rule 1 - Use the apostrophe with contractions. The apostrophe is always placed at the spot where the letter(s) has been removed.
    Examples: don't, isn't. You're right. She's a great teacher.

    Rule 2 - Use the apostrophe to show possession. Place the apostrophe before the s to show singular possession.
    Examples: one boy's hat. one woman's hat. one actress's hat. one child's hat. Ms. Chang's house

    NOTE: Although names ending in s or an s sound are not required to have the second s added in possessive form, it is preferred.
    Examples: Mr. Jones's golf clubs. Texas's weather. Ms. Straus's daughter. Jose Sanchez's artwork. Dr. Hastings's appointment (name is Hastings). Mrs. Lees's books (name is Lees)

    Rule 3 - Use the apostrophe where the noun that should follow is implied.
    Example: This was his father's, not his, jacket.

    Rule 4 - To show plural possession, make the noun plural first. Then immediately use the apostrophe.
    Examples: two boys' hats two women's hats. two actresses' hats. two children's hats. the Changs' house. the Joneses' golf clubs. the Strauses' daughter. the Sanchezes' artwork. the Hastingses' appointment. the Leeses' books.

    Rule 5 - Do not use an apostrophe for the plural of a name.
    Examples: We visited the Sanchezes in Los Angeles. The Changs have two cats and a dog.

    Rule 6 - With a singular compound noun, show possession with 's at the end of the word.
    Example: my mother-in-law's hat

    Rule 7 - If the compound noun is plural, form the plural first and then use the apostrophe.
    Example: my two brothers-in-law's hats

    Rule 8 - Use the apostrophe and s after the second name only if two people possess the same item.
    Examples: Cesar and Maribel's home is constructed of redwood. Cesar's and Maribel's job contracts will be renewed next year. Indicates separate ownership.
    Cesar and Maribel's job contracts will be renewed next year. Indicates joint ownership of more than one contract.

    Rule 9 - Never use an apostrophe with possessive pronouns: his, hers, its, theirs, ours, yours, whose. They already show possession so they do not require an
    apostrophe.

    Correct: This book is hers, not yours.

    Incorrect: Sincerely your's.

    Rule 10 - The only time an apostrophe is used for it's is when it is a contraction for it is or it has.
    Examples: It's a nice day. It's your right to refuse the invitation. It's been great getting to know you.

    Rule 11 - The plurals for capital letters and numbers used as nouns are not formed with apostrophes.
    Examples: She consulted with three M.D.s. BUT She went to three M.D.s' offices.
    The apostrophe is needed here to show plural possessive.
    She learned her ABCs.
    the 1990s not the 1990's
    the '90s or the mid-'70s not the '90's or the mid-'70's
    She learned her times tables for 6s and 7s.

    Exception:
    Use apostrophes with capital letters and numbers when the meaning would be unclear otherwise.
    Examples: Please dot your i's. You don't mean is. Ted couldn't distinguish between his 6's and 0's.
    You need to use the apostrophe to indicate the plural of zero or it will look like the word Os.
    To be consistent within a sentence, you would also use the apostrophe to indicate the plural of 6's.

    Rule 12 - Use the possessive case in front of a gerund (-ing word).
    Examples: Alex's skating was a joy to behold. This does not stop Joan's inspecting of our facilities next Thursday.

    Rule 13 - If the gerund has a pronoun in front of it, use the possessive form of that pronoun.
    Examples: I ap

  • by wonkey_monkey (2592601) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @05:58AM (#41891595) Homepage
    Yes, it's not like Slashdot has editors whose job it is to make sure headlines and summaries are gramatically correct and easily readable.
  • Re:Another win (Score:5, Informative)

    by thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) <(moc.liamg) (ta) (esidarap.cram)> on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @08:02AM (#41892031) Homepage Journal

    Privacy law requires a specific purpose, it is not legal to say that "we share your personal data with third parties" in a contract: the parties must be specified. This is especially the case for terms and conditions documents*.

    You mean like... Skype's [skype.com]

    .
    Our primary purpose in collecting information is to provide you with a safe, smooth, efficient, and customized experience. Skype collects and uses, or has third party service providers acting on Skype’s behalf collecting and using, personal data relating to you, as permitted or necessary to:
    --snip--protect your and Skype’s interests, including in particular to enforce our Terms of Service and prevent and fight against fraud, (together, the Purposes). ...
    Skype may disclose personal information to respond to legal requirements, exercise our legal rights or defend against legal claims, to protect Skype’s interests, fight against fraud and to enforce our policies or to protect anyone's rights, property, or safety

    And like Paypal's [paypal.com]...

    How we share personal information with other parties... Service providers under contract who help with our business operations such as fraud prevention, bill collection, marketing and technology services. Our contracts dictate that these service providers only use your information in connection with the services they perform for us and not for their own benefit.

  • by ozmanjusri (601766) <aussie_bob@@@hotmail...com> on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @08:35AM (#41892183) Journal

    No.

    Microsoft is using thousands of Linux boxes as Skype supernodes so they can fulfill the US government's wiretapping requests. It was reported and discussed here on Slashdot.

    http://linux.slashdot.org/story/12/05/03/2225234/microsoft-using-linux-to-optimize-skype-traffic [slashdot.org]

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