Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Australia Censorship Crime Facebook

Facebook Won't Take Down Undercover Cop Page In Australia 254

Posted by timothy
from the don't-try-it-in-texas-though dept.
New submitter jaa101 writes "Facebook has refused a request from Australian police to take down a page with details of undercover police vehicles saying it cannot stop people taking photos in public places. The original story is paywalled and it doesn't give a link to the relevant page which seems to be here . This page for the state of Victoria has 12000 likes but a similar page for the state of Queensland has over 34000, and there are other Australian pages too."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Facebook Won't Take Down Undercover Cop Page In Australia

Comments Filter:
  • by FatLittleMonkey (1341387) on Saturday October 20, 2012 @07:31PM (#41717801)

    ...if you've done nothing wrong, you have nothing to fear. Are they now saying that information can be misused by wrong-doers, and that privacy actually has a value?

    • by girlintraining (1395911) on Saturday October 20, 2012 @11:40PM (#41719159)

      Are they now saying that information can be misused by wrong-doers, and that privacy actually has a value?

      Almost. They're saying their privacy has value and your privacy doesn't. Although this is hardly the first time authority has claimed exemption from its own laws. While I'm sure there are earlier examples, it was Syrus who first said "Ad calamitatem quilibet rumor valet", which translated means "Every rumor is believed when directed against the unfortunate." That's how authority keeps people supporting it no matter how bad the justification is. I could be a police officer and right now get up, walk outside, and shoot the first person I see in the head. No reason whatsoever. But here's the thing: The human mind can't handle reasonless action. All actions require justification, and so we fill in what we don't know with what we expect. What we want.

      In the end, the guy I just shot in the head, well... he deserved it. He must have done something. Why else would me, the nice police officer, have shot him?

      And that's how they get you -- every time. Authority is always right because authority is always right because...

  • Undercover? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by radiumsoup (741987) on Saturday October 20, 2012 @07:39PM (#41717841)

    Unmarked != undercover... or is that what Aussies call their unmarked cars?

    • Re:Undercover? (Score:4, Informative)

      by Kinky Bass Junk (880011) on Saturday October 20, 2012 @07:42PM (#41717853)
      You're absolutely correct - most of the vehicles on the page are unmarked highway patrol, a few detective vehicles but nothing I would consider 'undercover'. If they were undercover they wouldn't be in a vehicle that has radios and lights installed, they'd be using portables.
    • by deniable (76198)
      Given the drivers are usually in uniform, I wouldn't call them undercover.
    • by PPH (736903)

      Right. These are generally used for traffic enforcement. The real undercover cars are generally picked up short term from Rent-A-Wreck or whatever cheap local rental outfit you have there.

      For unmarked traffic enforcement purposes, something that is popular and blends in is what they use. Speeders can't be bothered to check a list of plate numbers and knowing that the cops use a silver Honda Accord will just make them jump every time one of a few thousand identical cars goes by.

      The real criminals are screw

  • by Hentes (2461350) on Saturday October 20, 2012 @07:43PM (#41717869)

    The list of people following the page is a good list of possible suspects. The police should be thankful of Facebook for doing their job for them.

  • UC-Car vs UC-Cop (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Penurious Penguin (2687307) on Saturday October 20, 2012 @08:09PM (#41717991) Homepage Journal
    Seems it aint so easy to do the same in the YouEssay -- at least not with an actual officer: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/16/melissa-walthall-texas-undercover-cop-facebook-arrest_n_1970479.html [huffingtonpost.com]
    So far, two people have been caged for that.
    • by Revotron (1115029)
      If the article is to be believed, she and a few other people posted a picture of the officer in retaliation for the officer testifying in a drug case against one of her friends. So, you've got a charge of retaliation for that offense, but since she actively identified the person as being an undercover cop, she also blew open any current cases the officer was working on, which would also open her up to obstruction of justice.

      The article questions whether retaliation is a legitimate charge because it can o
    • by Baloroth (2370816)

      Seems it aint so easy to do the same in the YouEssay -- at least not with an actual officer: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/16/melissa-walthall-texas-undercover-cop-facebook-arrest_n_1970479.html [huffingtonpost.com]

      The difference being those are actually undercover cops, not just unmarked cars (which the story is actually about), which usually contain uniformed police and are not terribly hard to identify (except in the dark).

  • by Gothmolly (148874) on Saturday October 20, 2012 @08:13PM (#41718007)

    Sucks when the law works against you, doesn't it?

    Good for facebook - teach these little hitlers that society works both ways. Being a part of the executive doesn't provide you with special privilege.

    • Good for facebook - teach these little hitlers that society works both ways. Being a part of the executive doesn't provide you with special privilege.

      You're complimenting Facebook... on protecting people's privacy? It's fitting that they're supporting others' loss of privacy... since they're the worst thing ever to happen to it.

    • by houghi (78078)

      Sucks when the law works against you, doesn't it?

      It is good to see that we have an international lawyer who know what is and is not allowed in Australia vs. what is and is not allowed in e.g. the USofA.

  • Crims hung out on Flinders street outside the WTC police offices and wrote down the rego plates of cars going in and out. It created a bit of a stir but they are entitled to hang out in public places and write things down.

"Just Say No." - Nancy Reagan "No." - Ronald Reagan

Working...