Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Crime Government Your Rights Online News

Innocence of Muslims Filmmaker Arrested, Jailed 747

Posted by Soulskill
from the onward-with-the-conspiracy-theories dept.
sycodon writes "Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, the man behind the film Innocence of Muslims, has been arrested and jailed in Los Angeles for probation violations. The situation is a win-win for the Obama administration, who can now appear to be punishing the man whose film sparked protests and riots around the world, but at the same time simply enforcing the law, as all evidence indeed suggests Nakoula violated the terms of his probation."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Innocence of Muslims Filmmaker Arrested, Jailed

Comments Filter:
  • Why? (Score:5, Informative)

    by sunking2 (521698) on Friday September 28, 2012 @12:47PM (#41490633)
    What does his apparently violating parole have at all to do with this site?
    • Re:Why? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by geoffrobinson (109879) on Friday September 28, 2012 @12:48PM (#41490657) Homepage

      Because it is quite likely that this arrest is about censorship to appease jihadists.

      • Re:Why? (Score:4, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 28, 2012 @12:52PM (#41490709)

        Good point. Normally they never arrest people for probation violations.

      • appease jihadists (Score:5, Insightful)

        by frovingslosh (582462) on Friday September 28, 2012 @01:15PM (#41491113)
        Absolutely correct. California could be better using their time and effort protecting us from Linsey Lohan and others like her, but they release them after 45 minutes because the jails are too full. But this guy said something (supposedly) unpopular, so the system is going after him with everything they can come up with. This is clearly an effort to appease a supposedly religious group by further eroding basic American freedoms.
  • by xevioso (598654) on Friday September 28, 2012 @12:47PM (#41490637)

    They should have done this weeks ago. It was clear he violated his probation from the beginning.

    It's very important for Muslims across the world to understand that he was NOT arrested and jailed for the CONTENT of that movie, but because he continually provided false aliases to the judge and the police in violation of his probation.

    I wonder if the protesters in Egypt will understand this...my guess is probably not.

    • by EverlastingPhelps (568113) on Friday September 28, 2012 @12:54PM (#41490745) Homepage

      It's very important for Muslims across the world to understand that he was NOT arrested and jailed for the CONTENT of that movie, but because he continually provided false aliases to the judge and the police in violation of his probation.

      I wonder if the protesters in Egypt will understand this...my guess is probably not.

      There's no chance that the Muslim world will see this as anything but censorship. First of all, let's be clear -- they are right when they see it that way. That's what it is. He would have never come to the attention of anyone had the state not been embarrassed by this.

      Second, these are people who are protesting about a youtube clip that the vast majority of them haven't even seen, and only know of by word of mouth. That sort of Telephone game is never going get that sort of nuance across, even if it were true, which of course, it isn't.

      • by xevioso (598654) on Friday September 28, 2012 @01:21PM (#41491223)

        Bullshit. This man was not arrested for antyhing he said in any video. he was arrested because he violated the terms of his probation, which included NOT GIVING FALSE ALIASES TO AUTHORITIES, something he apparently has a pathological tendency to do.

        He came to the attention of the state because he has previously been tried and convicted of multiple crimes. He was on probation. The state of California is not embarrassed by anything this man said.

        It looks like there was one very pissed off judge who refused to give him bail because he is a pathological liar. The California legal system deals with these sorts of people all the time.

        • by Andy Dodd (701)

          Yup. His video could've been some insanely popular stupid viral video with trained chihuahuas juggling - end result would've been the same (assuming the video received significant attention for some positive reason). Jail time for parole violation.

          • by xevioso (598654) on Friday September 28, 2012 @01:58PM (#41491941)

            Actually, it easily could have been that. People are arrested for violating the terms of their parole when those terms involve "Do not contact Person X" and they click a Facebook Like button.

            If you are told not to get on the internet, and you post a chihuahua youtube video, you could very easily end up before a Judge. And if you give said Judge a false name, you could wind up in Jail.

  • by Revotron (1115029) on Friday September 28, 2012 @12:48PM (#41490651)

    The situation is a win-win for the Obama administration, who can now appear to be punishing the man whose film sparked protests and riots around the world.

    This is outrageously ridiculous. Why would it be a "win-win" for the Obama administration to appear to be punishing someone for exercising his First Amendment right to free speech?

    • by wiredog (43288)

      An analogy:

      It's not a crime for a man to visit a public playground, but if the man in question is a parolee with a conviction for child molestation and a court order requiring him to stay 1000 feet away from playgrounds...

  • it didn't (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 28, 2012 @12:51PM (#41490705)

    It didn't spark riots around the world. At least the ambassador in Libya was killed in a targeted attack by Al Qaeda [smh.com.au]. The ambassador was worried about his safety for weeks before his death. We know this because CNN reporters walked into the compound and looked around [cnn.com]. Security was NOT good at this place.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 28, 2012 @12:52PM (#41490711)

    I'll be so fucking glad when we kick Bush out of office....

  • by Krojack (575051) on Friday September 28, 2012 @01:02PM (#41490853)

    They won't stop. They will demand we hand him over so they can slowly behead him [wikipedia.org] and post that on the internet then drag his body though the streets [wikipedia.org] and hang it from some bridge [bbc.co.uk].

  • by gstoddart (321705) on Friday September 28, 2012 @01:05PM (#41490923) Homepage

    The situation is a win-win for the Obama administration, who can now appear to be punishing the man whose film sparked protests and riots around the world, but at the same time simply enforcing the law, as all evidence indeed suggests Nakoula violated the terms of his probation

    Obama can't be seen as punishing him for exercising free speech.

    Anybody who believes that is going to subsequently demand than anybody who says anything equally inflammatory be equally punished. And if those hypothetical people haven't broken their parole, nothing at all will happen.

    It needs to be clear, this guy is being arrested only because he violated the terms of his parole in terms of using an alias or the internet. But it's essentially unrelated to the film and that has to be made clear.

    There is simply no way the US government can be seen to be suppressing free speech. The last thing Obama wants to do is use this to his advantage. Because the reality is, that he isn't being punished for free speech -- he's being punished because he's a shady guy who violated his parole.

  • by JDG1980 (2438906) on Friday September 28, 2012 @02:09PM (#41492107)

    I can understand that, given the amount of publicity both nationally and worldwide, the government really had little choice but to enforce the probation terms once it came out who the filmmaker really was and that he must have violated the terms to go on YouTube to upload it.

    But when is someone going to point out that probation terms like these are absurd on their face? The Internet is a basic part of modern life. Everyone uses it, and even someone who tries to avoid it might well find themselves violating the terms by accident. (For instance, is using a GPS device counted as using the Internet? From a technical standpoint, that's often what is happening.) Probation terms ordering people to stay away from computers might have made some sense back in the days of Kevin Mitnick and Captain Crunch, but they are utter nonsense in 2012. You might as well make a probation term telling someone they can't watch TV or read a newspaper.

Every nonzero finite dimensional inner product space has an orthonormal basis. It makes sense, when you don't think about it.

Working...