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Nestle's GPS Tracking Candy Campaign 172

Posted by samzenpus
from the oompa-loompa-I'm-tracking-you dept.
colinneagle writes "In a cool yet creepy marketing campaign, Nestle plans to stalk UK consumers. The company kicked off a unique promotion called 'We will find you' that involves GPS trackers embedded in chocolate bars. When a winning consumer opens the wrapper, it activates and notifies the prize team who promises to track them down within 24 hours to deliver a check for £10,000. A Nestle spokesman added that 'inside their wrappers, the GPS-enabled bars looked just like normal chocolate bars.'"
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Nestle's GPS Tracking Candy Campaign

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  • oblig (Score:2, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward

    In Soviet Russia, YOU find chocolate!

    • by Joce640k (829181)

      I know a guy who works at Nestle and he told me this is just the government trying out their new tracking devices.

    • In Soviet Russia, you better find the chocolate fucking fast, even if it's not there.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I won roughly $200 from a lottery, and the guy who was supposed to find me used 14 days to deliver the prize. He sent an email saying that I had won those money and just to register at a site to win the prize. I thought it was an attempt to scam me for money, so I made his job very hard. It didn't help when the company in question changed its name. I wondered what on earth was going on.

    • by todrules (882424) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @09:16AM (#41398007) Journal
      I had almost the same thing happen to me, but I had "won" $25 million from a Nigerian prince, who was in exile. I never did receive my money though.
    • by ackthpt (218170)

      I won roughly $200 from a lottery, and the guy who was supposed to find me used 14 days to deliver the prize. He sent an email saying that I had won those money and just to register at a site to win the prize. I thought it was an attempt to scam me for money, so I made his job very hard. It didn't help when the company in question changed its name. I wondered what on earth was going on.

      AllAboutTheBaby keeps calling my mobile phone and would like my address, birthdate, bank acount, etc, for awarding me a $100 prize. Right!

      Meanwhile, I hope those chocolate bars are clearly labeled or you'll see something like this: Man Sues Candy Company Over Poisoning: "Tasted Like Resistors," Says Victim

  • by thegarbz (1787294) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @04:15AM (#41396589)

    Wonder how long before someone stars running up and down candy store aisles with a metal detector.

    • I think an RF detector set to GPS frequencies would be a lot faster. This is dumb x10. They make Lean Cuisine promotions look smart and they don't even know that men buy their products apparently. So people will accidentally eat the GPS device? Great promotions/law suit inducer.
      • by Joce640k (829181)

        Maybe you could read the article: The bit about "when the winner pulls the tab" is quite informative.

        Dumb, indeed.

      • by thegarbz (1787294)

        I think an RF detector set to GPS frequencies would be a lot faster.

        You may want to rethink this. GPS does not involve a the location device transmitting anything. Even on phones the airplane mode doesn't disable GPS. Not to mention how well GPS will work indoors :-)

    • I expect people in the UK will start to find that every chocolate bar in the store broken or smashed as people "look" for the winning bars by bending and squeezing them.

  • GPS Trackers (Score:3, Interesting)

    by smi.james.th (1706780) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @04:17AM (#41396591)
    Anyone who's ever used a GPS, especially not a dedicated device e.g. a smartphone, knows that it's a bit of a mission to get the thing to actually lock on to sattelites. If one was really paranoid one could just carry one's chocolate in a metal box until one gets home, then the GPS will never lock on anyway. So I doubt there are any real privacy implications here...
    • by lhunath (1280798)

      Um, you see no privacy implications involved with having to put your chocolate bars in a metal box in order NOT to be tracked?

      Sounds to me like you're already part of brainwashed society.

      • No, not brainwashed. Just don't care much. They can try to track me if they want to, but embedding a GPS in a chocolate bar is going to be quite ineffective for the reasons that I've mentioned.

        If some hypothetical paranoid person REALLY doesn't want to be tracked but REALLY wants a chocolate, then the metal box would be more than adequate to foil the tracking attempts...

    • by naich (781425)

      That and you have to pull a tab to activate the tracking system, so it's not tracking you until you choose to let it.

    • by SpaghettiPattern (609814) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @07:54AM (#41397425)

      If one was really paranoid one could just carry one's chocolate in a metal box until one gets home, then the GPS will never lock on anyway.

      I always carry suspicious items like chocolate bars under my hat.

      Note to /.newbies: When in doubt always assume tin-foil as material for any garment discussed on /.)

    • by HiThere (15173)

      I would guess that rather than use a real GPS they used a triangulation system based on cell-phone towers. GPS in urban environments can be quite iffy.

  • by Chrisq (894406) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @04:18AM (#41396595)
    I hope that a winning bar is taken by a soldier to the front-line in Afghanistan. I'd love to see Nestle track them down and deliver the cheque within 24 hours!
    • by Immerman (2627577)

      That would be awesome! Quick, everyone break out your metal detectors and lets send a bunch of extra-special care packages to the folks on the front lines.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      you're going to shit a little multicolored sphere when you learn that they have an elite fighting force of oompa loompa's and they airdrop those bastards into a village and they go all Robotron on the place.

  • Its a con (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Chrisq (894406) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @04:20AM (#41396603)
    Its that pervo Willy Wonka after kids again.
  • obligatory reference [wikipedia.org] yet. For extra bonus points, let's theorize about what the prize claimant will have to do as part of the claims process.

  • Augustus Gloop Veruca Salt Violet Beauregarde Mike Teavee and Charlie Bucket.
  • If you live there get five friends with metal detectors to canvas stores. Increase your chances.
  • So, do I get more money if I hide the wrapper in a Faraday cage so that they can't find me?

    What happens if I open the bar in the street, and throw the wrapper? Will they track down the garbage?

    The article is a bit light on the details...

    And yes, this is quite creepy. The article talks about a similar promotion in Brazil. A country with a high crime rate. Turns out people were a bit suspicious of strangers knocking on their doors...

  • Baby milk (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Threni (635302) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @04:36AM (#41396673)

    Any chance of a promotion to track down the parents of kids who've died in the third world due to the heavy, illegal promition of powdered milk there?

    • by Joce640k (829181)

      Any chance of a promotion to track down the parents of kids who've died in the third world due to the heavy, illegal promition of powdered milk there?

      If Nestle didn't do it, somebody else would.

      At least Nestle doesn't use lead in their products.

  • by linebackn (131821) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @04:41AM (#41396693)

    A way while back there was a very similar attempt by Coke to put a GPS in a coke can, and swoop in and award the winner.

    This raised a lot of security concerns, as there are many places where it would be bad for this to go off in, such as inside a military base.

    Links:
    http://tech.slashdot.org/story/03/09/30/189208/track-a-soda-can-with-gps [slashdot.org]
    http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/04/05/06/136205/gps-cell-phone-in-soda-can-form [slashdot.org]

  • What do I win if they can't find me? I mean I'm pretty good at hide & seek you know!
  • I predict somebody working at some Nestle warehouse to pass all the boxes through a metal detector.
  • Anyone else remember the Coca Cola MagiCan [wikipedia.org] competition from 1990? They had a big problem with the mechanisms jamming, and then there was that rumor the someone died from drinking the contents of one. PR disaster.

    I'm waiting for the first report of Nestlé tracking down some poor dead kid's stomach to award it £10,000.

  • Probably violates wiretapping laws.

    • by Inda (580031)
      Which wiretapping laws would they be?

      "Nestle plans to stalk UK consumers"
      • by digitig (1056110)

        There are wiretapping laws in the UK too. But the consumer has to pull a tab to activate the transmitter, which will presumably be deemed consent.

        What I'm not clear about is whether the transmitter is as well as the chocolate or instead of. If the latter, Nestle had better hope the bar isn't bought by a diabetic who needs a quick sugar fix because they feel themselves going hypo.

    • Probably violates wiretapping laws.

      There are two possibilities: a. It doesn't affect you. Most likely. b. They come to your home and offer to hand over £10,000 to you. You have the choice of taking the cash or complaining about violation of wiretapping laws. What will you do?

  • That's the real purpose of this campaign.
  • Good luck finding me in the sewers!

    On a more serious note, this could cause loads of trouble to an unsuspecting guy if an airport scanner picks it up.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    make the chocolate taste terrible.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I'm not entirely up to date with GPS devices, but last time I used one the accuracy really put me off from ever using them seriously. Specifically took part in a demonstration of using GPS devices on RC cars, which was sponsored by a hobby shop. We took them out to a forest and drove them around, with a camera on the car streaming back to the base they set up for us. After an hour when the batteries died we had to use the GPS devices to track down the cars, with first 3 to find the cars allowed to keep them

    • by digitig (1056110)
      GPS is likely to get them close enough to use a tracker to pick up the source of the signal. They might not do that, though, because Tracker [wikipedia.org] is made by a competitor.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    The electronic device disguised a chocolate bar will be picked up by the X-Rays, taken outside and blown up by the army. Meanwhile the person carrying it will be locked up without trial (it's the UK, not the free world) for months.

  • If its got a GPS receiver and some sort of transmitter in it, then its going to have metal. Seems like one could easily check an entire box of unopened candy bars for a winner with just a metal-dector.

    • Yes competitions like this fail because someone in the distribution process with a warehouse full of bars will have enough intelligence to find the bars and get accomplices to plant them in shops.
    • by ledow (319597)

      Most of the chocolate bars I see nowadays come in foil packets. But I don't doubt there would be some way to "distinguish" the winning bar if you happened to have access to an entire box of them and time enough to experiment.

  • by Telecommando (513768) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @06:58AM (#41397207)

    "the GPS-enabled bars looked just like normal chocolate bars"

    So, broken in 3 or more pieces and melted on one end?

  • Given the average accuracy of a GPS device it's going to be a sod to pinpoint the recipient.

    Having said that, I'd go and look around dentists in the vicinity - if that bar really looks the same as a chocolate bar the unlucky finder may need the prize to pay for the dental damage :)

  • How about a plastic chocolate bar with a phone number engraved: phone here and get ££££!
  • You just need a Non-Linear Junction Detector to find it?
  • And device not taken outdoors. Can't GPS lock through a ceiling.
  • I first thought of "Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?" Someone with a lot of money and free time could really mess with Nestle, although I doubt they would really try too hard to track you down....
  • >A Nestle spokesman added that 'inside their wrappers, the GPS-enabled bars looked just like normal chocolate bars.'"

    Personally, I make a distinction between the chocolate bar and the wrapping, so this seemed to imply to me that the GPS tracker might be INSIDE the actual chocolate bar and not the wrapper. Putting the tracker IN the actual chocolate... now that would be a bit intrusive.

  • I love the fact so many people still refer to it as “Tin Foil” despite the fact we've been using aluminum foil, not tin, since the middle of last century. This gives me hope for such phrases as “dialing the phone.”
    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      I love the fact so many people still refer to it as âoeTin Foilâ despite the fact we've been using aluminum foil, not tin, since the middle of last century.

      Tin was first replaced by aluminium in 1910, when the first aluminium foil rolling plant, "Dr. Lauber, Neher & Cie." was opened in Emmishofen, Switzerland. Not the middle of the last century, the very beginning.

      This gives me hope for such phrases as âoedialing the phone.â

      Well, you'd have to come up with a short enough replacement

  • In the TV ad, they say that the bar will (when opened) send a signal to a satellite, the satellite will then send a signal to Nestle who'll dispatch (what look like) militarised special forces people in helicopters and sliding down abseil ropes to hand you a suitcase full of money.

    Now I must admit, I do like the odd kit-kat (and also a kwik-krap), but I think I'll be abstaining for a few weeks until some other poor sap gets the "prize".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk2Lfgh1c4Q [youtube.com]

  • And I thought Willy Wonka was creepy...

  • by neko the frog (94213) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @09:46AM (#41398415)

    I've heard of chocolate adding on pounds before but this is ridiculous *chomps cigar*

  • by boristdog (133725) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @10:37AM (#41399113)

    Or Crunchy Frog.

    Constable Clitoris ate one of those!

  • They have a Prize Team? They're taking this tracking you down thing very seriously. I'm imagining a van pulling up on the curb and the A-Team jumping out check in hand.

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestl%C3%A9_boycott#The_baby_milk_issue [wikipedia.org]

    This wikipedia article puts it mildy, I'll put it as it s, they're a bunch of fucking scum baby killers who market baby powder to mothers living in places where the water will kill the babys.

    I for one am boycotting all nestle products for life, the company should be shut down for a crime of this size.

    They even admit it on their own website, they say they've stopped, I don't care either way, but from what other sites say, they haven't stoppe

  • "Please ensure your seat backs and tray tables are in the fully upright and locked position. Please ensure that all electronic devices are switched off at this time. Once the captain has indicated that it is okay, certain electronic devices may be used in flight; please check the magazine in the seat back pocket. Some devices may not be used at any time in the flight, these devices include remote control devices, radios, chocolate bars, ..."

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