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Android Piracy Your Rights Online

Android Piracy Sites Seized By US Government 184

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the it's-not-like-anyone-buys-them-anyway dept.
Dupple writes with news that the DOJ took a few Android app piracy sites offline. From the release: "Seizure orders have been executed against three website domain names engaged in the illegal distribution of copies of copyrighted Android cell phone apps, Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Department of Justice's Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Sally Quillian Yates of the Northern District of Georgia and Special Agent in Charge Brian D. Lamkin of the FBI's Atlanta Field Office announced today. The department said that this is the first time website domains involving cell phone app marketplaces have been seized. The seizures are the result of a comprehensive enforcement action taken to prevent the infringement of copyrighted mobile device apps. The operation was coordinated with international law enforcement, including Dutch and French law enforcement officials."
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Android Piracy Sites Seized By US Government

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  • Trolls (Score:4, Insightful)

    by noh8rz7 (2706405) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @08:41AM (#41080241)
    Wow, judging by the above comments, the apple trolls/shills are out in full force! Will the real tim cook please stand up?
  • by alen (225700) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @08:42AM (#41080265)

    but most of the good apps and games aren't available in the uganda google play store

  • Re:In the Meantime (Score:5, Insightful)

    by canadiannomad (1745008) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @08:49AM (#41080365) Homepage

    Does this not make you scared: "In most cases, the servers storing the apps sold by these alternative online markets were being hosted in other countries, and our international law enforcement partners assisted in obtaining or seizing evidence stored on these servers."
    I really hate the extent to which the US is exerting its thought crime laws in other sovereign nations. I guess not so sovereign any more.

  • Apple (Score:2, Insightful)

    by slashmydots (2189826) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @08:57AM (#41080451)
    Too bad everyone's not using 1 thoroughly monopolozed...I mean centralized Apple store. Then instead of virus infested counterfeit apps, they'd only have to deal with Apple secret police kidnapping apps randomly out of the store for no reason, insane overpricing/insane profit margins, psychotic Apple geniuses (see story a couple down from this one :-P ) and human rights violations.
  • Re:In the Meantime (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @08:59AM (#41080473)

    Does this not make you scared: "In most cases, the servers storing the apps sold by these alternative online markets were being hosted in other countries, and our international law enforcement partners assisted in obtaining or seizing evidence stored on these servers."
    I really hate the extent to which the US is exerting its thought crime laws in other sovereign nations. I guess not so sovereign any more.

    Hmmm ... labelling copyright violations as "thought crime laws" is what makes me more scared. Come on, people -- we're talking about apps that cost the same as a cup of coffee (if not less). If you've ever written software, you'd know how much work it is; why do people get so upset at having to occasionally pay to support an independent developer?

    (disclaimer -- personally, I release all my software as free and open source, but I also believe that it's completely fair and reasonable if people want to charge for what they write.)

  • Re:Criminal law (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @09:01AM (#41080511)
    Copyright infringement is a civil matter.
  • Re:Criminal law (Score:2, Insightful)

    by roman_mir (125474) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @09:04AM (#41080541) Homepage Journal

    1. Copyright infringement is not theft. It's a crime under the law, but it is not defined as theft, otherwise it wouldn't be a separate thing, called copyright infringement.

    2. Why is it a criminal offence to steal? Why is the government involved in judging people criminally for theft? Why shouldn't it be a completely private matter between the 2 private sides? OK, when it is stolen from government or when government is doing the stealing, then it would make sense, but government being involved in theft cases? It's a private matter, it should be left up to the private security and civil courts to deal with. Do you really want a thief being locked up in government prison rather than being forced to just return the goods and/or repay the damages (plus a large fine, maybe a 3 times value of the stolen goods?) What does it matter to you if a thief is in jail - you are still out of property, and now you are going to pay taxes to keep him in jail.

  • Re:In the Meantime (Score:2, Insightful)

    by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland AT yahoo DOT com> on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @09:16AM (#41080677) Homepage Journal

    It's immoral to allow some to determine the distribution of their work for a limited time?

    You're an idiot, but what ever helps you sleep at night when you continue to rip people off,.

  • What a moron (Score:4, Insightful)

    by MikeRT (947531) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @09:18AM (#41080709) Homepage

    I really hate the extent to which the US is exerting its thought crime laws in other sovereign nations. I guess not so sovereign any more.

    Thought crime? Have you even read 1984? A thought crime is a "crime" in which the mere desiring something contrary to the law is itself a punishable criminal act. No proposed copyright law has come even close to being a "thought crime." You do genuine civilian libertarians absolutely no good with this extremist hyperbole and only make the rest of us copyright minimalists look like idiots.

    Heck, while I'm at it, I have news for you. We have these modern law enforcement mechanisms called "extraditions" and "international partnerships." This means that if people from your country screw over the US Government in the US, you help us stop them. Believe it or not, the US Government has actually done this in reverse on behalf of foreign countries such as when it puts Americans in prison for going to places like Uganda and Thailand to rape children or when it arrests Americans who raise funds for guerrilla groups abroad.

  • Re:In the Meantime (Score:4, Insightful)

    by ScentCone (795499) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @09:24AM (#41080757)

    Does this not make you scared

    Yes, your shrill, deliberate mis-use of the term "thought crime" and purposeful embrace of the practice of ripping off thousands of man-hours of work in order to save the cost of a cup of coffee - that is scary. Because it shows just how entrenched the entitlement-minded leech culture is.

    Stop Global Whining.

  • Re:In the Meantime (Score:2, Insightful)

    by kaizendojo (956951) on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @09:25AM (#41080773)
    So do nothing? The thing you fail to address is that pirated apps are one of the prime vectors for security hacks and viruses, espceially in the mobile sector.
  • Re:But... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Gaygirlie (1657131) <gaygirlieNO@SPAMhotmail.com> on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @09:41AM (#41081003) Homepage

    But there isn't an Android piracy problem!

    It depends on how one defines "piracy problem," like e.g. at what point does piracy become a problem and when it isn't a problem, and who is it a problem to anyways? Is it a problem if there's over 1% piracy rate? If so then iOS, Android, BB, Windows, OSX, Linux, BeOS, DOS and so on would have a "piracy problem." Or is it a problem only when popular things are being pirated? Atleast I don't see law enforcement ever going after pirates for spreading some niche product that only appeals to a small base, even if the piracy rates in that base were over 90%. Is piracy a problem to the users, is it a problem to developers who are actually still making nice profit even with 40% piracy rates, or is it a problem to publishers who cry foul even about a single pirated copy even if they're raking in cash like madmen, all just because they want every single last penny in their pockets? I don't see users complaining about piracy, and I see plenty of developers who simply ignore piracy as long as they're generating profit, I only see these money-hungry entities complaining.

    Even if we just focus on the fact that there's piracy on Android-platform we have to look at its surroundings: Android is very similar to e.g. Windows in terms of end-user-oriented openness, allowing one to install and remove software freely. Only Android, however, is getting flak for piracy at the moment, piracy on PCs is being ignored. Why? Well, because people like OP like to jump on whatever happens to be the new trend, because developers these days are trained to believe that any amount of piracy whatsoever is a problem, and because, well, most Android-apps are crappy, shallow pieces of sh*t and cost mere pennies -- the general populace won't see the apps worth much if even the developers themselves don't, therefore said populace won't see it as a loss for the developer if they just pirate the things instead. Combine said arbitrary worthlessness with an open platform and it's no wonder piracy exists.

    All that said the developers and publishers themselves are to blame for their problems: make your apps worth not pirating, and either develop only for walled-garden platforms or accept piracy as a fact of life and ignore it as long as you're still generating profits.

    The fandroids said so!!! This is all just Apple FUD!!

    No, I'm not an iShiny faggot, either.

    To be honest, your sexual orientation is not relevant here nor does it reflect on your intellect in any way or form. The use of terms like "fandroids," "iShiny," and "faggot" along with multiple exclamation marks and the lack of any kind of argument whatsoever does, however. I do realize your comment was an attempt at trolling Slashdot-users and you were hoping for some enraged comments which is why I so much enjoy responding to these kinds of attempts with calm, coherent comments -- think of it as reverse trolling, if you will.

  • Re:In the Meantime (Score:5, Insightful)

    by alexgieg (948359) <alexgieg@gmail.com> on Wednesday August 22, 2012 @10:26AM (#41081647) Homepage

    It's immoral to allow some to determine the distribution of their work for a limited time?

    Yes, it is. You don't do it by yourself, you know? You go to nanny State and papa Government and beg them to please, pretty please, violate the property rights of every single other human being on Earth for your own benefit, so that my computer isn't mine anymore, it's the government's, which now merely allows me to use it in the ways they deem right and legit. That's quite immoral, yes.

    Which isn't to mean authors shouldn't be rewarded. But they should be rewards in whatever way the free market develops, not by way of employing the full force of the hugest apparatus of violence ever assembled in the History of mankind.

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