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Verizon Government Wireless Networking

Gov't Approves Parts of Verizon-Cable Spectrum Sale 76

Posted by Soulskill
from the santa-doesn't-give-you-everything-you-want dept.
fistfullast33l writes "The Associated Press is reporting that the Justice Department, FCC, and New York State Attorney General approved portions of a deal between Verizon Wireless and cable companies Comcast, Time Warner Cable, Bright House Networks and Cox to sell parts of the wireless spectrum to Verizon for $3.9 billion. However, the Justice Department rejected the agreement between the two groups to allow Verizon to market cable services in its stores in markets where it also offers FIOS service. The spectrum will be used to increase Verizon's 4G LTE network coverage. Verizon will also sell some spectrum to T-Mobile. Consumer groups were very concerned about the cross-marketing by Verizon: 'When it comes to home broadband, Verizon Communication Inc.'s FiOS provides the only significant competition to cable in many areas. Yet FiOS is costly to build out, and Verizon's commitment to the technology has faltered. Consumer groups and unions that opposed the deal between the cable companies and Verizon said it showed that Verizon was further giving up on FiOS and yielding the home broadband market to cable.'"
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Gov't Approves Parts of Verizon-Cable Spectrum Sale

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  • by Trepidity (597) <delirium-slashdot@noSPam.hackish.org> on Friday August 17, 2012 @10:56AM (#41023837)

    If their Kansas-City fiber experiment goes well, perhaps they'll expand into markets Verizon is losing interest in with FiOS.

    • by alen (225700)

      the TV part of google fiber is crapola. and a little with FIOS as well.

      i have some family who live in the FIOS footprint. they still have cable. the reason is that they watch A LOT of international TV and the cable company has 4 of their language international channels. FIOS has 2. cable costs $80 a month more, but for them its worth it for those channels since that is what they mostly watch.

      same with almost every other language channel lineup. lots of people in the USA watch them and are willing to pay for

      • by Dyinobal (1427207) on Friday August 17, 2012 @11:12AM (#41024057)
        Who seriously gets Google Fiber for the TV aspect of it? I dropped my cable subscription years ago, went with my local DSL because my cable company was crap. That trend is growing, plenty of people don't get cable because of the TV aspect but because it is the best way to get broadband for their area.
        • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Who seriously gets Google Fiber for the TV aspect of it? I dropped my cable subscription years ago, went with my local DSL because my cable company was crap. That trend is growing, plenty of people don't get cable because of the TV aspect but because it is the best way to get broadband for their area.

          I know I'm wasting my virtual breath here, as you sound like the sort of hipster wonk who's probably been reminded of this hundreds upon hundreds of times in your life and it still hasn't sunk in yet, but you are not the normal internet user . Maybe you were at one point. Like, in the 80s, before everyone started using it. But nowadays, you aren't . For the vast amount of people who aren't you , they actually want TV service OVER internet service.

          Seriously. They. Want. TV. Service. AND, get this

          • by Khyber (864651)

            "For the vast amount of people who aren't you , they actually want TV service OVER internet service."

            Wrong, they're forced to get it because bundled packages are cheaper than the standalone internet service.

            Old hat trick. So sorry you're too ignorant to see it.

        • ...plenty of people don't get cable because of the TV aspect but because it is the best way to get broadband for their area.

          And all too soon, US broadband will be just like cable TV: corporatized, regulated for morals, bundled, overpriced, and no real freedom whatsoever.

        • by Svartalf (2997)

          IF you can get Google Fiber. Unless you're in Kansas City, you're not getting it for a while yet to come.

          • I am in Kansas City and it is questionable whether I can get it. Because they only give it to people who have enough pre-subscribers in their area (they call the areas Fiberhoods) who also sign up for it. I am the only person in my Fiberhood who is a potential subscriber. My friend's neighborhood had 3 people sign up so far, far from the goal. My brother's neighborhood reached the goal and he can actually get it. In general, it looks like their strategy has, in a roundabout way, led to mostly middle and upp
        • Getting Google fiber with TV has a price less than what I'm currently paying for Time Warner cable with Roadrunner broadband in Kansas City. By about $10 or so. The only channel I'd lose that I'd care about is Velocity TV.
        • by dijiplat (2713807)
          IF you can get Google Fiber. Unless you're in Kansas City, you're not getting it for a while yet to come.-- http:www.dijiplat.com [dijiplat.com]
      • by cpu6502 (1960974)

        >>>the TV part of google fiber is crapola. and a little with FIOS as well.

        I'm surprised to hear that. I did a quick review of FiOS channel listing and it was hundreds..... more than I would ever watch. In fact I don't even have cable: Just an antenna and still barely watch the 40 channels I get.

        Quick list:
        - ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, CW, MyNetTV, Ion
        - ~10 independents (mostly showing talkshows & reruns of Xena,SG1, etc)
        - PBS, PBSkids, PBSinfo (documentaries), PBSart(live concerts), PBScreate
        - MindTV

        • by alen (225700)

          that's nice

          too bad my inlaws don't watch most of these but the russian channels they have and the ones FIOS doesn't. same with international channels in almost every other language. lots of immigrants in the USA from all around the world who like to watch TV from their birth country.

          • by cpu6502 (1960974)

            Naturally.
            I've stayed in a lot of Indian-owned hotels over the years, and all of them had a satellite dish in order to watch their home channels. That's because in most areas of the U.S. cable systems don't carry foreign nations' channels..... for example my town's Comcast has none. In my experience that's the norm rather than the exception.

        • by Urza9814 (883915)

          FiOS has RT? Shit, I may have to subscribe to TV then, I currently have a data-only package and I think adding TV is only $5 or $10 extra...

        • if i decide to ditch cable completely and get an antenna where can i go to check what channels i would get?
          • by Anonymous Coward

            http://antennaweb.org/

      • by kaiser423 (828989)

        I don't know if you've noticed this, but the cable TV part of cable is crapola also.

        I was paying $45 a month for all SD, no HD channels with fewer channels than I got over the air. To upgrade to equivalent of what I could get for free was $60/mo, and anything with more stuff was pushing ~$100.mo. This is Comcast in my area. But they have the best internet hands down. So I'm doing only internet. Despite them offering me the "basic cable" package for $1/mo on top of my broadband I still declined because

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I dont think they will be giving up on the "home broadband" market, but will probably focus on trying to attack it differently, wirelessly.... theres an awful lot of spectrum out there.

    • One is called HPC or Home Phone Connect. It's a wireless base station in the house that connects to 1X and then routes it to a home phone(Voice Only.) The other is Home Fusion Broadband. Same concept except this is broadband(LTE) that connects computers and other data devices. It's amazing how VzW is bitching about data usage yet they offer a TON of solutions that use the data more and more.
  • by devjoe (88696) on Friday August 17, 2012 @11:16AM (#41024097)
    The part of the deal that was rejected was related to Verizon Wireless selling the cable TV service from Comcast et al. (not FIOS TV) in their stores. This little detail is missing from the summary. Without understanding this, the "Verizon's commitment to the technology has faltered" makes little sense, since it would seem like they were trying to support FIOS if they wanted to sell FIOS TV service through their stores.

    That they even considered doing this shows how little Verizon and Verizon Wireless cooperate. They are two separate companies, alike in name only.

    • I thought it was clear? Maybe missing the word TV?

      However, the Justice Department rejected the agreement between the two groups to allow Verizon to market cable services in its stores in markets where it also offers FIOS service

  • I find it hard to believe as Verizon FiOS is building out like crazy in my area and have been for at least the last 5yrs now. Who knows, maybe they had these plans laid out years ago and just want to finish them up?
  • by kriston (7886) on Friday August 17, 2012 @11:36AM (#41024323) Homepage Journal

    Fiber to the premises is too costly. In relatively built-up suburban areas it can cost between $2000 and $7000 per subscriber. In rural areas it costs between $5000 and $12000 per subscriber. And you wonder why Verizon has stopped building outside of already committed build-outs, and why Verizon has sold entire DSL and FiOS plants to Frontiernet and Fairpoint?

    Hybrid fiber/cable as used by cable television companies like Cox and Comcast is far cheaper with comparable actual speed. Naturally with HFC they cannot claim the same theoretical speed but the practical speeds in a modern DOCSIS 3 HFC plant in real life (and not from speedtest.net) is very comparable for far, far less cost to both subscriber and operator.

    • by cpu6502 (1960974)

      Why? I don't see why splitting a single fiber off the main bundle (and to the home) is any more expensive than splitting Coax for Comcast TV?

      • You don't have FiOS, do you? In addition to my regular ol' modem, there's a big fibre link and battery backup box bolted to the wall of my basement. Ignoring the fact that fibre line and the splicing is pricey, theres a lot more equipment required for each home, for which Verizon foots the bill.
      • HFC CATV systems are already everywhere. All comcast has done is buy up local cable companies and upgrade the active equipment. No need to replace the millions of miles of plant out there. DOCSIS3.0 doesn't know the difference between coax from the 1970's or 2012. Most homes are wired for CATV and already have a coax drop running to the street. All comcast has to do it plug them in.

        FiOS has to build out from scratch. They have all the labor costs in trenching or hanging the fiber to the house. They have to

        • Thats why they are bailing on FiOS. There is quicker money to be made elsewhere.

          Exactly. Put a "public" company in charge of "public" infrastructure and they can/should be held to be financially irresponsible to their shareholders for installing high-quality infrastructure when they are holding a monopoly grant from the local government and can get away with installing crap.

    • But when the cable companies justify monthly bandwidth limits they imply that they can only sustain a few hundred Kb/s per user before the network becomes congested...
    • by Khyber (864651)

      "In relatively built-up suburban areas it can cost between $2000 and $7000 per subscriber. In rural areas it costs between $5000 and $12000 per subscriber."

      Durrr, as if those subscribers will/will not leave and some other person just reuses existing infrastructure.

      Verizon wasn't making money fast enough for their tastes.

      Poor planning and execution, that is all this is.

      • by Rakarra (112805)

        Where are they supposed to come up with that money? How are they supposed to make it back? Do you think they could just charge every single person $2000-$12000?

    • In relatively built-up suburban areas it can cost between $2000 and $7000 per subscriber. In rural areas it costs between $5000 and $12000 per subscriber.

      That's not the cost to run to the subscriber, that's the all-inclusive cost to finally fix their ancient broken-ass network so that they can finally make a drop to the subscriber. It's going to have to be done sooner or later anyway.

      • by kriston (7886)

        Of course it is the cost of building the fiber and deploying the drop, but this is provided that all houses along the line become subscribers. The money has to come from somewhere. How does a rural provider make back $12K per subscriber? Answer: they don't.

        Tthere is no guarantee that all of those customers on the street you're building on are going to become subscribers. This is also why Verizon got permission to physically cut the copper lines in FiOS neighborhoods. It forces a customer who chooses to

  • FiOS is the name of a service that is delivered over fiber. The fiber itself is not the service. FiOS is essentially the same as cable service without the coax. It does have additional bandwidth by using different wavelengths for the data, and using a wide broadband for the QAM TV.

    While at least two companies are now offering at least a gigabit bandwidth to their customers over fiber, FiOS simply has no chance of serving that kind of demand (but neither does cable). Fios could maybe serve 10 customers w

He keeps differentiating, flying off on a tangent.

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