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Piracy Your Rights Online

Demonoid Shut By Ukrainian Authorities 178

Posted by samzenpus
from the book-em dept.
hypnosec writes "After a prolonged outage that lasted for nearly a week Demonoid has reportedly been audited and closed down by the Ukrainian law enforcement agency. According to reports the Ukrainian anti-cybercrime police division carried out an investigation of ColoCall – the hosting service provider for Demonoid. Servers were sealed after all the data on the servers was copied. According to ColoCall the servers haven't been seized but, they are not operational any more. The hosting service provider is going to end the agreement with Demonoid. 'Investigators have copied all the information from the Demonoid servers and sealed them.' a manager from ColoCall, wishing to stay anonymous, said."
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Demonoid Shut By Ukrainian Authorities

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 06, 2012 @02:55PM (#40897747)

    About time that the Ukraine accepted what most governments of the world have already accepted--that the U.S. is your master and you had goddamn well better do whatever the fuck we tell you to!

    Now sit, rollover, and say "We're your bitch!" ....No, SAY IT LOUDER!!

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      What I want to know was did they have permission from the server owners to copy all that data....
      • by shentino (1139071)

        They probably had a search warrant.

        • by xenobyte (446878)

          They probably had a search warrant.

          For what? - I'm willing to bet that there isn't a single bit of illegal material on any demonoid server. It's portal and a tracker, not a bitlocker!

    • by lightknight (213164) on Monday August 06, 2012 @05:12PM (#40899231) Homepage

      Lord and master. We own their land, too.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Jahava (946858)

      About time that the Ukraine accepted what most governments of the world have already accepted--that the U.S. is your master and you had goddamn well better do whatever the fuck we tell you to!

      Now sit, rollover, and say "We're your bitch!" ....No, SAY IT LOUDER!!

      This does raise a worthwhile issue: I couldn't find anything in the article that says that the US requested that Demonoid be shut down for this meeting.

      Now, the US Authorities are likely quite happy that it was shut down, but that's a different point. Doing something to please a trade partner isn't necessarily being its "bitch". People, corporations, and countries, the US included, suck up to each other all the time as a sign of respect, deference, and/or good faith and to gain a more favorable status. That

    • About time that the Ukraine accepted what most governments of the world have already accepted--that the U.S. is your master and you had goddamn well better do whatever the fuck we tell you to!

      Now sit, rollover, and say "We're your bitch!" ....No, SAY IT LOUDER!!

      Because there are so few countries with copyright laws you mean ? At least where I live, the local copyright people + a whole lot of small companies are pushing the government like mad to do stuff like this, saying tens of thousands of jobs depend on it.

      Also I've recently visited a very large software company (in America), and the developers were nearly universally in favor of copyright laws and destroying things like demonoid and thepiratebay. I'm not sure if that's typical, and yes, the youngest guy there

      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 06, 2012 @07:07PM (#40900155)

        Because there are so few countries with copyright laws you mean ?

        No, because websites shouldn't be taken down just because there is some infringing material on them. The US is already seizing domain names randomly. That's bad enough. Other countries don't need to go and do similar things.

        Also I've recently visited a very large software company (in America), and the developers were nearly universally in favor of copyright laws and destroying things like demonoid and thepiratebay.

        Not exactly the most unbiased group to ask, eh? Ask me if I deserve a million dollars.

  • by dyingtolive (1393037) <brad...arnett@@@notforhire...org> on Monday August 06, 2012 @02:58PM (#40897795)
    If your shit's not safe in the Ukraine, it's not safe anywhere.
    • by f3rret (1776822) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:00PM (#40897833)

      Well if the story is anything to go by, then the site was not closed down over copyright claims, it was shutdown over serving malware adds.

      I can see why the Ukranians would shut it down over that.

      Russian doesn't give a damn about US copyright claims.

      • Interesting. I'll have to check the links when I'm off work.
      • by JDG1980 (2438906) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:04PM (#40897889)

        Russian doesn't give a damn about US copyright claims.

        Ukraine != Russia.

        The former Soviet republics that are now independent states (including Ukraine) tend to be friendlier to the US and EU than Russia itself is, because they rely upon NATO support to maintain effective independence from Russian control.

        • by C0C0C0 (688434) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:52PM (#40898379)

          Ukraine != Russia.

          The former Soviet republics that are now independent states (including Ukraine) tend to be friendlier to the US and EU than Russia itself is, because they rely upon NATO support to maintain effective independence from Russian control.

          Ukraine != Poland, either. The entire northern half speaks Russian natively and, despite the best efforts of the Ukrainian Ukrainians, they appear to have the upper hand in parliment right now. I'd say that the jury is still out, and while Ukraine certainly isn't Belarus, they lean a lot more towards Moscow than you suggest.

        • by tlambert (566799) on Monday August 06, 2012 @05:11PM (#40899223)

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukraine%E2%80%93NATO_relations [wikipedia.org]

          It's currently on hold because of their current president and parliament, as part of trying to keep Russia from coming unglued at them. However, if their stated intention to join the EU goes through, it's likely they will become a NATO member state (21 of the 27 EU member states are currently members of NATO). Currently, they engage in joint military exercises with NATO.

          • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukraine%E2%80%93NATO_relations [wikipedia.org]

            It's currently on hold because of their current president and parliament, as part of trying to keep Russia from coming unglued at them. However, if their stated intention to join the EU goes through, it's likely they will become a NATO member state (21 of the 27 EU member states are currently members of NATO). Currently, they engage in joint military exercises with NATO.

            As someone who can speak Russian pretty well and has spent a decent amount of time there and still has friends there, I can provide some insight. Basically when Krushchev took over in the 50s he moved some territory from the Russian SSR to the Ukrainian SSR. He was from Ukraine and if you look at a map, the move did make sense as it made the areas in question much closer to their SSR capital (Kiev) than they had been (Moscow). The problem was that when the USSR split up that these areas were primarily Ru

        • The former Soviet republics that are now independent states (including Ukraine) tend to be friendlier to the US and EU than Russia itself is, because they rely upon NATO support to maintain effective independence from Russian control.

          Not all of them. Baltic states, certainly, and also Georgia. Belarus goes back and forth, but it's not particularly welcome in Europe with its current regime in any case, so it mostly uses the "we'll go to EU" card to force Russia to give some consessions. Most Central Asian states are dictatorships, ranging from mild (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan) to extreme (Turkmenistan, Tajikistan), and as such aren't really very friendly to either US or EU. Additionally, those of them which border Afghanistan and Pakistan ha

          • by Grishnakh (216268)

            I wonder why they didn't just split the country, with the western half being "Ukraine" and the eastern half staying part of Russia. Then both groups would be happy, except the people right in the middle and in the capitol.

            • The eastern part, and especially Crimea (which is most heavily russified) has been raising that point occasionally, not really very seriously so far but more as a stick to get something else - "if you don't do what we ask for, we're gonna hold a referendum to separate" sort of thing.

              The problem with this approach is that it's not like the split is clear-cut geographically. Much like red/blue in US, either side has a strong minority residing in it from the other; and in both cases, the split would hurt them

              • by Grishnakh (216268)

                and the language issue can be solved (right now Ukrainian is the sole official language, which is a major grievance with russophones in the east; on the other hand, many Western nationalists despise the de facto popularity of Russian as threatening their identity). Much the same way as it is in Canada today. Though, then again, Canada is also not exactly a shining example of success in that area...

                Maybe I'm misinformed about Canada, but I thought in Canada, almost everyone spoke English, except for the peop

                • By "same way as in Canada" I meant making both languages official on the federal level, as well as in the public education system (with reasonable limitations), but otherwise letting the provinces do their thing - Quebec only has French as an official languages, obviously, but most other provinces use English de facto without specifying a de jure official language, and some are officially bilingual. You can always find a place that works best for you, while retaining your citizenship.

                  I don't know about too

      • by interkin3tic (1469267) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:15PM (#40897993)
        Does the Ukranian government regularly take action against malware? If not, then no, they got shut down for copyright infringement, and "We're shutting down this malware site for your protection, citizen" is a lie on the same level as "We had to shut down the protest because they didn't have a proper permit, not because we don't like their message."
      • by poetmatt (793785) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:34PM (#40898209) Journal

        they never had malware ads, but they did turn on the ads after being DDOS'd due to the bandwidth bill. Considering that such a thing happened literally in the last two days I can't see why the Ukranians would shut it down that fast or even have the capability to, for that matter.

        • by shentino (1139071)

          I think they got hacked by a copyright cartel friendly blackhat just to give the ukracops an excuse to shut them down.

          Kinda like planting CP on your boss's computer then calling the cops on them.

      • by gl4ss (559668) on Monday August 06, 2012 @04:15PM (#40898645) Homepage Journal

        there's another twist of the story that ". According to one source in the Ministry of Internal Affairs, the investigation was timed to coincide with Ukrainian First Deputy Prime Minister Valeriy Khoroshkovsky's visit to the United States, after he released a statement with the US Trade Representative agreeing to "redouble" intellectual property enforcement. While the ColoCall source says Demonoid has backup servers elsewhere, nothing has been restored at this point."

        http://www.theverge.com/2012/8/6/3223253/demonoid-bittorrent-tracker-shut-down-by-ukrainian-police [theverge.com]

        so they're doubledowning and redoubling efforts. Maybe they won't bother with finding out who to prosecute and for what, but that's not the point of eastern european lipservice police work really.

        • by horza (87255) on Monday August 06, 2012 @10:14PM (#40901389) Homepage

          Ukraine is incredibly corrupt. It's the main factor dragging the country down. A young girl can hitch-hike home in the early hours of the morning after clubbing and be safe. There is nearly no aggression I have seen. Hanging out around the Black Sea on a Friday night is safer than being in London. The people are really friendly, and sometimes even charge the real price! However the police patrol the streets and if they see a drunk tourist they will drag him down a side street and kick the crap out of him before taking his watch and wallet. Even simple paperwork at the police station means bribes for everybody you come into contact with. Scams from "law enforcement" officers are rife. If one top guy decides Demonoid is out, don't expect them back. Certainly there will be no appeal. Wonderful country with fantastic people, but don't expect real justice.

          Phillip.

        • by Grishnakh (216268)

          after he released a statement with the US Trade Representative agreeing to "redouble" intellectual property enforcement.

          That reminds me of the scene in Star Wars (or was it RotJ?) where Darth Vader visits the Death Star and talks to the commanding officer about how unhappy the Emperor is with the progress on construction, and the officer nervously promises to "redouble" their efforts.

      • by shentino (1139071)

        So maybe someone friendly to the MAFIAA poked a black hat into planting malware on it, and then blew the whistle on malware.

        It's almost like calling the feds after hacking CP onto someone's computer. Which has been done btw.

      • by shentino (1139071)

        And I bet you whoever planted those ads was paid off by copyright lobbies.

      • by shentino (1139071)

        Kinda fishy since they apparently got hacked into.

        You'd think that cybercops would be going after the hackers.

        • by f3rret (1776822)

          Kinda fishy since they apparently got hacked into.

          You'd think that cybercops would be going after the hackers.

          You'd think a lot of things. (This is probably going to sound racist, deal with it) Eastern European politics aren't exactly known for their transparency and willingness to divulge information about the basis for its decision-making.

          Oh and it's often corrupt as hell, so make of that what you will.
          The malware thing was probably just an excuse to go after them for whatever reason they had behind the scenes-

          • by tehcyder (746570)

            (This is probably going to sound racist, deal with it) Eastern European politics aren't exactly known for their transparency and willingness to divulge information about the basis for its decision-making.

            "Eastern European" is not a race, so the phrase you're looking for is "xenophobic stereotyping based on ignorance and prejudice".

            • by f3rret (1776822)

              "Eastern European" is not a race, so the phrase you're looking for is "xenophobic stereotyping based on ignorance and prejudice".

              I could have used "Slavic", would that have made a difference? Politics in the FSU has a long and storied history of corruption, I guess western politics have too, so there you go.

    • by Noughmad (1044096)

      If your shit's not safe in the Ukraine, it's not safe anywhere.

      Kramer 1, Newman 0

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:03PM (#40897869)

    Congratulations! It will now take people an additional 3 clicks to find the movie, game or song they want to steal!

    Keep up the good work, guys, people will stop making unlicensed digital copies any day now!

    • by MickyTheIdiot (1032226) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:27PM (#40898139) Homepage Journal

      When Doctor Who started up again Demonoid torrents were the only way us USAians could see it *at all*. It probably helped Who and many other BBC shows get their American deals.

      There is definitely advantages for content owners here whether they want to admit it or not.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 06, 2012 @04:12PM (#40898617)

        If you think demonoid was the only place to get Doctor Who, you're hilariously incorrect.

      • by neminem (561346) <.moc.liamg. .ta. .menimen.> on Monday August 06, 2012 @04:13PM (#40898627) Homepage

        You mean except for all of the other torrents that existed in other more actually private private trackers? And probably also public trackers.

        I'm not arguing with your main point (New Doctor Who is exactly how I got introduced to the wonderful world of illegally stealing tv shows too), but Demonoid wasn't the only place you could go (I've only ever used it for a few things.)

      • Viva la Usenet!
        • if you keep saying that they will notice it and kill it to, as an afterthought mind you but they will do it. Usenet would be fairly easy to kill due to it not being as distributed as p2p, i mean i cant fire up google in a tor browser type a hash of my download find 50 usenet groups with the and add them to my peer finding pool like i can with torrents.

          what we need is free usenet server system living in a .onion or a torent over tor system

        • by Legion303 (97901)

          No, shut up. Ixnay. Sssh.

      • by xenobyte (446878)

        When Doctor Who started up again Demonoid torrents were the only way us USAians could see it *at all*.

        I got all my Doctor Who needs adequately satisfied by www.thebox.bz who specializes in British TV. That they were proud of Doctor Who was evident in the fact that for a long time their main logo was the TARDIS and the name itself is also a reference to the TARDIS Police Box. These days, it's a slang reference to a tv set and both the main logo and favicon is a pictogram of a classic tv with a rabbit ear antenna. It's fast and the rips are always flawless (and often exclusive), and they treat their users dec

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:11PM (#40897955)

    OTOH, US Law Enforcement could take a lesson on how to conduct a raid on a datacenter. Go in with a forensic team, isolate, copy, preserve, and leave the shit in place. You don't go in with bolt cutters to cables, wipe out businesses of a dozen other bystanders in the facility, seize stuff for months, or prevent businesses from starting back up.

    • by jamstar7 (694492) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:23PM (#40898101)
      But that's not as much fun, nor does it appeal to the 'cowboy' mentality it seems a lot of Feds have been cultivating lately. And the collateral damage? Shouldn'tve put your data on a server those eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeevil terrorrorrorrist pyrates could use! Now go file the appropriate papwerwork, along with the appropriate fees, and maybe, if you're good kids and eat all your vegetables, they MIGHT let you see your (totally legal) data sometime before the Second Coming of Elvis.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      wipe out businesses of a dozen other bystanders in the facility, seize stuff for months, or prevent businesses from starting back up

      You're assuming that this isn't the entire point of a raid: Send a clear message to all businesses on the planet, "don't come in contact with anything near copyright violation, if nessessary, we'll nuke the site from orbit, if that's the only way to be sure."

    • by Shagg (99693)

      Depends on what your goal is.

  • Shocking! (Score:5, Funny)

    by frovingslosh (582462) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:24PM (#40898105)
    There is a Ukrainian law enforcement agency? Who knew?
  • well.. crap (Score:5, Insightful)

    by lemur3 (997863) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:26PM (#40898131)

    I know its been said before.. but I think itd worth saying again..

    A lot of stuff on demonoid wasnt in print anymore, and there was a big focus on books/other things that arent readily available anymore.

    I think that it brings up a big point that we miss when the whole debate of copyright infringement and pirating the newest movies is brought up in relation to these torrent sites.

    These places are in some ways the last place to easily access important parts of the culture of the world.... Is it so important to protect the newest blockbuster films at the cost of so many people losing access to bits of global creative culture that they cant access legally ?

    • Re:well.. crap (Score:5, Insightful)

      by MickyTheIdiot (1032226) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:30PM (#40898179) Homepage Journal

      One area that is constantly ignored are the grey-area copyrights (where no one knows who owns the copyright because a copyright holder has gone bankrupt) and the stuff in torrents that is not even in print. Trading that stuff doesn't hurt anyone and, as a matter of fact, often gets them noticed again and brought back into print. Has anyone ever heard a greedhead from the *AAs even acknowledge this?

      • Re:well.. crap (Score:5, Insightful)

        by DarwinSurvivor (1752106) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:40PM (#40898259)
        You'd be lucky to get them to acknowledge that grey-area copyright and out-of-copyright materials even exist in the first place!
      • Re:well.. crap (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Shagg (99693) on Monday August 06, 2012 @05:59PM (#40899661)

        Of course they won't acknowledge this. The **AAs are not advocates of the artists, they're advocates of the distribution companies. By definition, they couldn't care less about grey-area copyrights because those don't have anything to do with their business.

      • Re:well.. crap (Score:5, Interesting)

        by PsychoSlashDot (207849) on Monday August 06, 2012 @08:06PM (#40900589)

        One area that is constantly ignored are the grey-area copyrights (where no one knows who owns the copyright because a copyright holder has gone bankrupt) and the stuff in torrents that is not even in print. Trading that stuff doesn't hurt anyone and, as a matter of fact, often gets them noticed again and brought back into print. Has anyone ever heard a greedhead from the *AAs even acknowledge this?

        You don't understand. If you're consuming entertainment material that isn't available legally anymore, you're STEALING from the makers of content that is legally available. How can this be? Simple. You have X hours of entertainment time in your week. If there is no free entertainment available, you will purchase entertainment that is not free. By going back to out-of-print material or by dipping into TV/movies that are no longer available, you are wasting your valuable entertainment dollar-hours that should have been invested in Big Entertainment. For shame.

        • by shentino (1139071)

          Funny...

          If they are my entertainment hours, how does anyone but me get to decide how they are spent?

          Contrary to what the mafiaa goons want everyone to believe, it's MY calendar, MY clock, and MY wallet.

          I will use them as I fucking see fit, and I will start by punishing anyone who tries to convince me otherwise by not patronizing them.

          News flash to the mafiaa: Trying to control my purchasing decisions with DRM and region locking and other crap is the fastest way to piss me off and make me not watch your stu

    • A lot of stuff on demonoid wasnt in print anymore, and there was a big focus on books/other things that arent readily available anymore

      The files themselves were not hosted on Demonoid, just the index, comments, and tracker. The "stuff" still exists on everyone's hard drives. I'm sure a lot of it will pop back up on other locations. One lesson to learn from this is a big central site is not so good from a security standpoint, it makes too attractive a target. 100 specialized sites catering to different interests would be more resilient, since it makes the work to take them down 100 times harder.

      • by nabsltd (1313397)

        The files themselves were not hosted on Demonoid, just the index, comments, and tracker. The "stuff" still exists on everyone's hard drives. I'm sure a lot of it will pop back up on other locations.

        AFAIK, torrents tracked by the Demonoid tracker were not required to be exclusive to that tracker. At this point, it's pretty much all tracked by other trackers or DHT. The only real issue would be the torrents that are not indexed anywhere else...they will still live on, but you won't be able to search for them.

  • by cpu6502 (1960974) on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:35PM (#40898219)

    If it were the U.S. I'd be worried they'd come after the stored user data & put people into indefinite detainment (under NDAA 2012).

  • DDOS (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 06, 2012 @03:50PM (#40898353)

    So, are we comfortable with officially labeling the DDOS from which Demonoid has been suffering these past few days an act of officially-sanctioned vandalism on the part of law enforcement, local or otherwise? Because this is damned coincidental, if not... and should be terrifying to businesses the world over if true.

  • The country that tolerates you one day can turn against you the next, and you have little or no recourse.

    At least in the United States, if you have enough cash you have access to the courts.*

    *Pissing of the feds in ways that invoke National Security(TM) are, sadly, excluded. But as far as copyright violations go, any American has as much access to the courts as he has money to pay lawyers. This is not true in some other countries.

    • by Grishnakh (216268)

      That's why it's a good strategy to keep everything separate. Don't live in the same country you're hosting questionable material in (even if it's just links and there's no copyrighted material there at all); live someplace nice, and keep the questionable stuff in someplace that doesn't care. And keep regular backups, so if they suddenly do care, you can start up an identical site in a different 3rd-world country that doesn't care. And make sure to keep your association with these sites secret.

    • by lpq (583377)

      At least in the United States, if you have enough cash you have access to the courts.*

      Tell that to the owner of the megadownloads...

      The US freezes assets of accused people exactly so you DON'T have access to good defense. That's been true since Bush-I signed the zero tolerance and forfeiture laws in back almost 20 years ago.

      The owner of the site who the US tried to have deported from New Zealand -- who didn't entirely cooperate...offered to come back to the US for trial if they unfroze his assets so he co

  • by dave562 (969951) on Monday August 06, 2012 @05:06PM (#40899183) Journal

    /me admits to knowing.

    Why couldn't someone setup a site like Demonoid on Tor, but direct people out to the public internet to actually transfer the torrents? The tracker would exist on the Tor network, but the file sharing would be done on the public network and therefore not saturate the limited bandwidth available via Tor.

    Is there something inherent in bittorrent that requires the tracker and the transfer to take place on the same network? Is it so inherent in the application that it could not be separated into two separate components?

    • by Znork (31774) on Monday August 06, 2012 @05:38PM (#40899501)

      Technically you don't even need a tracker anymore as magnet links are enough for distributed hash tables, and magnet links can easily be distributed anywhere, while DHT is a builtin component of the transfer network. TPB already operates that way and would work fine on Tor (as far as I know there could already be several such tor sites, can't say I've checked).

      After that it'll probably go to i2p or turn over to the various f2f networks available. Sharing technology is already several generations ahead. The only question is really how far the pressure will go to push people towards an utterly unmonitorable network.

      Of course, ending up with an evolved completely opaque network has advantages once We The People will be forced to start lining people up against the wall.

      • "Of course, ending up with an evolved completely opaque network has advantages once We The People start being forced to line up against the wall."

        FTFY

  • Find a country to host these things in that wont bend over to the interests of the USA and its corporations.

    • by Grishnakh (216268)

      No, you just can't trust any one country or entity. Instead, find multiple countries to host these things, and keep the sites mirrored. If one country pulls a Ukraine, you have a handful of other countries still running the site.

  • According to torrent freak:

    http://torrentfreak.com/demonoid-busted-as-a-gift-to-the-united-states-government-120806/ [torrentfreak.com]

    >>> Shortly after [the DDoS] a hacker break-in occurred, and a few days later came the investigators,” the source added.

    Smells like a plant to me.

    What if the hacker was someone paid off by a MAFIAA friendly contact, and the hacker was paid to plant malware ads on the servers, just to give Ukrainian authorities an excuse to shut them down?

    It's just as devious as hacking someone,

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