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Censorship The Internet Your Rights Online

Church of Scientology Enlisting Followers In Censorship 628

Posted by Soulskill
from the good-luck-with-that dept.
DrEnter writes "Apparently, the recent very public divorce of Katie Holmes and devout believer Tom Cruise is reflecting negatively on the Church of Scientology. Adding to this are other recent issues causing problems for 'church' leadership. In response, the 'church' has decided to encourage its followers to censor online chatter and comments about the 'church' and the divorce. This Yahoo blog post sums it up nicely. In short, they are encouraging members to complain about people posting negative comments about the 'church' as violating the Code of Conduct' in the posting venue. I can only imagine they are hoping these complaints will just be rubber-stamped and respected without investigation, but I think the campaign deserves a bit more attention."
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Church of Scientology Enlisting Followers In Censorship

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:09PM (#40570215)

    Book 'em, Xenu!
    --
    Posting anonymously because the Church of Clams still uses vexatious lawsuits against their critics.

    • Re:First Thetan! (Score:5, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:18PM (#40570323)

      Book 'em, Xenu!

      Please remove the above post as it violate's Slashdot's code of conduct which requires the exact phrase "Frosty Piss" to be used in all first posts.

    • Re:First Thetan! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by FatdogHaiku (978357) on Friday July 06, 2012 @09:26PM (#40572551)

      Book 'em, Xenu!

      And it is at this point that we need to let the moderation "Funny" go past the 5 limit... sure there are many informative and insightful posts but once you hit 5 everyone gets it. Humor, however, can do amazing things including allegedly healing people. Also it has been proven to sometimes cause fluids to suddenly appear on monitor screens, keyboards, clothing, and furniture.

      That post was at least an 8...

  • by elrous0 (869638) * on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:09PM (#40570217)

    Call all your critics liars (and wife-beaters and child molesters if possible), send private detectives and Sea Org types to follow and harass them, sue them and anyone who supports them, cry religious persecution to the cops and govt officials, rinse, wash, repeat...

    Read [wikipedia.org] all about it, and more.

    • by ackthpt (218170) on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:23PM (#40570377) Homepage Journal

      Call all your critics liars (and wife-beaters and child molesters if possible), send private detectives and Sea Org types to follow and harass them, sue them and anyone who supports them, cry religious persecution to the cops and govt officials, rinse, wash, repeat...

      Read [wikipedia.org] all about it, and more.

      They remind me of a saying -- Their organization is so ridiculous that no matter how hard you tried you just couldn't make something like that up.

      Can't say I've met any, but I have met some real wackos in my life and I suppose if people will believe in 5 billion years ago some aliens put a bunch of people in a volcano that didn't exist yet, to watch a movie and then blew them up, how are you ever going to get them to see any sense?

      Meanwhile, it's Friday and me and my Thetans are going to go out and party. (c: Just a sec .. someone at the door

      NO CARRIER

    • by Larryish (1215510) <larryish@gmail.cDEGASom minus painter> on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:41PM (#40570605)

      From the Wikipedia link:

      Hubbard detailed his rules for attacking critics in a number of policy letters including one often quoted by critics as "the Fair Game policy." This allowed that those who had been declared enemies of the Church, called "suppressive persons" or simply "SP," "May be deprived of property or injured by any means...May be tricked, sued or lied to or destroyed." (taken from HCOPL Oct. 18, 1967 Issue IV, Penalties for Lower Conditions )

      Sounds kind of Masonic.

      All they need to throw in is "Admit nothing, deny everything, and make counter-accusations." and Hiram would give them all a great big hug-from-behind.

    • by Dcnjoe60 (682885) on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:53PM (#40570701)

      Call all your critics liars (and wife-beaters and child molesters if possible), send private detectives and Sea Org types to follow and harass them, sue them and anyone who supports them, cry religious persecution to the cops and govt officials, rinse, wash, repeat...

      Read [wikipedia.org] all about it, and more.

      Are you talking about scientology or the upcoming US presidential campaign?

  • by sandytaru (1158959) on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:13PM (#40570265) Journal
    I'm glad Katie dumped his ass and is doing her best to protect Suri from that cult.
  • Blog is not accurate (Score:4, Informative)

    by jklovanc (1603149) on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:29PM (#40570455)

    I am not a Scientologist and would never join a religion purported to be created on a bet.

    The blog takes quotes from the Scientology post out of context. It talkes bout clicking on the report tag and what to write but ignores the this intermediary step;

    4. Read the comment from people and pick the ones that fit the violation of the Code of Conduct.

    Where the blog post states that the Scientologists are directed to report all anti-Scientology comments they are actually directed to report only the ones that really brear the Code of Conduct.

    One final comment; Has the existence of this email been confirmed by an independent source? I would be suspect of anything reported by someone who has a bias against an organization without independent verification. That is one reason I generally don't read blogs; they have a tendency to be unverified and very biased..

  • by Ecuador (740021) on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:33PM (#40570499) Homepage

    It obviously violates the Slashdot code of conduct.
    It is not related to bitcoin or raspberry pi, it is not a dupe and has links to multiple articles that have a lot of text per page, requiring very few, if any, "next page" clicks. It might fool some that it has merit to be on slashdot by being a rather lame story that might appeal to people who like getting pissed at reading stories they don't consider "news for nerds", but I am sure you will agree that that alone is not enough.

  • The church of the Streisand effect

  • Oh Tee! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Nethead (1563) <joe@nethead.com> on Friday July 06, 2012 @05:58PM (#40570757) Homepage Journal

    Not nary two years ago I stood upon a roof top in Clearwater FL as a superhero of justice (network engineer) alongside my sidekick (general contractor) and peered (as we setup a Clearwire cell site) upon all those that had dedicated 1,000,000,000,000 years of their existence to serving the word of Mr. L. Ron Hubbard, a science fiction writer of some modest renown. We, in aghast awe, watched as they boarded their numerous bus vehicles to travel far to partake in what we would call lunch. What manor of noontime evil feast, we could not imagine. For they looked grim and uninspired.

    I bared my being to him at that time and allowed that for some short time in the early 80s I had once myself, this bastion of all that is right with network protocols, had fallen suspect to the siren cry of their teachings I related the trial and tribulations of having to buy their manuscripts and attend communication training (which, sadly, they did not impart the truth of a single RFC.)
    Fortunately I escaped by the narrowest means of not having enough money to buy the next book. For ages (about 2 hours) I beat my brow over not having the manly integrity to fight through my engrams and discover the universal truths of the Xemu protocol (RFC-infinity) and thereby understand, just my laying the wires upon my tongue, the truth of every communication protocol in the universe.

    But now that I've gone through deprogramming I'm much better.

    Now just if we could get everyone that believes in sky faeries to take deprogramming.

  • by jamrock (863246) on Friday July 06, 2012 @06:06PM (#40570853)
    "The difference between a cult and a religion is the amount of real estate they own." — Frank Zappa
    • by LordLucless (582312) on Friday July 06, 2012 @08:12PM (#40571949)

      "Cult" is one of those words that used to have a meaning, but has been so thoroughly divorced from its roots through perjorative use, that it now has no more actual meaning than any other curse word.

      A "cult" was originally a subset of a religion; it was most applicable to pantheistic religions (like ancient Greek religion). You'd have, within the overall religious framework, the "cult of Diana" or "the cult of Dionysus". They were all part of the same religion, but there were specific rituals and observances that related to specific deities within that framework.

      Within the rise of monotheism, "cult" became a lot less useful as a term. It basically came to mean a "branch" off of an existing religion, that is, a subset of religious believe that eventually came to be a distinct religion - you can see the similarity between this and its original meaning. Thus, Christianity would be a cult of Judaism, and Islam would be a cult of Christianity, as would Mormonism, Protestantism and the Latter-Day Saints.

      Of course, the dominant religion doesn't like it when people break away from it (see: the inquisition), so at this time, cult began to take on a negative connotation. Previously, it had been purely descriptive. Cults were outlawed (the church at this time was a political player, so it had the power to do this), disbanded and demonised. Over time, the church's political power waned, and it no longer had the opportunity to squash its cults.

      Nowadays, the perjorative connotation of the word "cult" is about all that remains. Technically, Christianity is still a cult of Judaism, but nobody (except atheists pushing the "all religions are cults" agenda) really describes it that way (and even the atheists are just using it as a perjorative, not in the technical sense).

  • Negative? (Score:4, Funny)

    by chrismcb (983081) on Friday July 06, 2012 @09:02PM (#40572377) Homepage
    Doesn't that imply that some things reflect positively on the "church?"
  • subject (Score:4, Funny)

    by Legion303 (97901) on Saturday July 07, 2012 @12:39AM (#40573537) Homepage

    "Apparently, the recent very public divorce of Katie Holmes and devout believer Tom Cruise is reflecting negatively on the Church of Scientology."

    More negatively than the deaths Scientology has caused? That must have been some breakup.

To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing. -- Elbert Hubbard

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