Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Government NASA Software Science Technology

US Navy's High-Resolution Radar Can See Individual Raindrops In a Storm 161

Posted by samzenpus
from the needle-in-a-haystack dept.
coondoggie writes "The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) researchers said recently that a Navy very high-resolution Doppler radar can actually spot individual raindrops in a cloudburst, possibly paving the way for new weather monitoring applications that could better track or monitor weather and severe storms. According to an NRL release, the very high-resolution 'Mid-Course Radar' was used to retrieve information on the internal cloud flow and precipitation structure. The radar was previously used to track small debris shed from the NASA space shuttle missions during launch. 'Similar to the traces left behind on film by sub-atomic particles, researchers observed larger cloud particles leaving well-defined, nearly linear, radar reflectivity "streaks" which could be analyzed to infer their underlying properties,' NRL stated."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

US Navy's High-Resolution Radar Can See Individual Raindrops In a Storm

Comments Filter:
  • useful.... (Score:5, Funny)

    by ushere (1015833) on Friday June 29, 2012 @03:05AM (#40491005)
    means you can avoid individual rain drops and keep your battleship dry.....
  • by sunwukong (412560) on Friday June 29, 2012 @03:09AM (#40491029)

    "Boss, I'll need some special equipment to see our data in the cloud ..."

  • Gee whiz (Score:-1, Funny)

    by ozduo (2043408) on Friday June 29, 2012 @03:10AM (#40491033)
    So instead of gazing at their navel the Navy can gaze at raindrops
  • by evilsofa (947078) on Friday June 29, 2012 @03:19AM (#40491073)
    How many raindrops are there in a storm?
  • by Hadlock (143607) on Friday June 29, 2012 @03:30AM (#40491119) Homepage Journal

    Might as well karma whore this myself, because someone else is going to, here's a brilliant quote from HHGTTG:

    Rob McKenna had two hundred and thirty-one different types of rain entered in his little book, and he didn't like any of them.
     
    Since he had left Denmark the previous afternoon, he had been through types 33 (light pricking drizzle which made the roads slippery), 39 (heavy spotting), 47 to 51 (vertical light drizzle through to sharply slanting light to moderate drizzle freshening), 87 and 88 (two finely distinguished varieties of vertical torrential downpour), 100 (postdownpour squalling, cold), all the sea-storm types between 192 and 213 at once, 123, 124, 126, 127 (mild and intermediate cold gusting, regular and syncopated cab-drumming), 11 (breezy droplets), and now his least favorite of all, 17.

    Rain type 17 was a dirty blatter battering against his windshield so hard that it didn't make much odds whether he had his wipers on or off.
     
    And as he drove on, the rain clouds dragged down the sky after him for, though he did not know it, Rob McKenna was a Rain God. All he knew was that his working days were miserable and he had a succession of lousy holidays. All the clouds knew was that they loved him and wanted to be near him, to cherish him and to water him.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday June 29, 2012 @09:51AM (#40493229)

    Stealth aircraft use electrogravity tech to reduce their weight by a significant amount. You are incredibly misinformed.

Facts are stubborn, but statistics are more pliable.

Working...