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Youtube Crime The Internet Your Rights Online

Police Using YouTube To Tell Their Own Stories 299

Posted by Soulskill
from the who-watches-the-watchers-who-watch-the-watchers dept.
stevegee58 writes "Posting videos to YouTube allegedly showing police misconduct has become commonplace these days. Now police themselves are posting their own videos to refute misconduct claims. 'After a dozen Occupy Minnesota protesters were arrested at a downtown demonstration, the group quickly took to the Internet, posting video that activists said showed police treating them roughly and never warning them to leave. But Minneapolis police knew warnings had been given. And they had their own video to prove it. So they posted the footage on YouTube, an example of how law enforcement agencies nationwide are embracing online video to cast doubt on false claims and offer their own perspective to the public.'"
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Police Using YouTube To Tell Their Own Stories

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