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Piracy The Internet Verizon Your Rights Online

US ISPs Become 'Copyright Cops' July 12th 409

Posted by samzenpus
from the reality-show-soon-to-follow dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Comcast, Time Warner and Verizon are among the ISPs preparing to implement a graduated response to piracy by July, says the music industry's chief lobbyist. ISPs, including Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon, and Time Warner Cable, have officially agreed to step up efforts to protect the rights of copyright owners. From the article: 'Supporters say this could become the most effective antipiracy program ever. Since ISPs are the Internet's gatekeepers, the theory is that network providers are in the best position to fight illegal file sharing. CNET broke the news last June that the RIAA and counterparts at the trade group for the big film studios had managed to get the deal through — with the help of the White House.'"
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US ISPs Become 'Copyright Cops' July 12th

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  • by Midnight_Falcon (2432802) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:34PM (#39371775)
    To finally drop Comcast and replace them with Sonic.Net DSL! I hope others follow suit and migrate to more ethical ISPs.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:35PM (#39371795)

    The excuse I need to drop Verizon and... wait, my only other option is Comcast? Damnit...

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:36PM (#39371805)

    Stop buying music and movies. Very simple!

  • by ka9dgx (72702) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:37PM (#39371817) Homepage Journal

    Land of the Foreclosed, home of the Banking Gangsters.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:38PM (#39371827)

    The internet was once thought of as a digital library and commons. Now it is little more than an interactive television.

  • Re:SSL? (Score:1, Insightful)

    by smileygladhands (1909508) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:41PM (#39371869)
    SSL requires an initial HTTP request that isn't encrypted, in order to transfer keys which are used to encrypt the connection. ISP's see the entire transaction from start to finish. Yay? Also, just wait until Linux Distributions and the Anarchist Cookbook become "illegal files".
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:50PM (#39371943)

    They probably have a clause buried in said existing contract that gives them the right to change it whenever they damn well feel like it, so I doubt you'll have much luck trying that.

  • by cpu6502 (1960974) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:53PM (#39371979)

    Same here. Verizon DSL has sent me 3 emails (about 2 years ago) where they caught me downloading movies or tv shows. I'm curious what they will do to me next time I'm caught. One thing's for sure:

    I'm not going to go out and buy Hollywood's crap, unless it's something I've already seen and liked -- such as Battlestar Galactica. This past year I downloaded about 200 movies and liked almost none of them. TV shows were a little better percentage but not by much.

    Instead I'll just read science fiction in books and magazines. Or watch free TV (the 45 channels I get over the antenna). Or free hulu. Or cheap games ($20 for 40+ hours is a good bargain). It makes no sense to buy movie/show DVDs when they have no return policy for the crap, and there are so many other options.

  • by mark-t (151149) <markt@@@lynx...bc...ca> on Thursday March 15, 2012 @07:54PM (#39372001) Journal
    Can you also sue a bar for entrapment, when you get nailed for driving drunk, when the bar could have simply stopped serving you after one drink?

    Be an adult, and take responsibility for yourself.

  • Awesome. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Zuriel (1760072) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:02PM (#39372101)

    With US ISPs playing copyright cop, darknets and other anonymizing techniques will be active by default in all P2P clients by the time my country rolls out similar laws.

    Being a step behind the US means workarounds will be mature and widespread by the time I have to deal with this...

  • by Hatta (162192) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:03PM (#39372121) Journal

    Nothing in this article indicates any sort of traffic monitoring on the part of the ISPs. It only sounds like a standardized way to keep track of the C&D letters they've been sending out for years.

    Don't get me wrong, this is bad too as there's no accountability for sending faulty C&D letters, and I doubt there's going to be much of an appeals process. But it's bad in a different way than deep packet inspection is.

  • by ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:05PM (#39372147)

    Cable is limited because the providers hoodwinked municipalities into giving them limited monopolies under the assumption that running multiple sets of lines would cause problems for the consumers including increased costs passed on as high prices. This is a lie, of course, but that's what we have at the point.

  • Bound to happen (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SuperTechnoNerd (964528) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:07PM (#39372161)
    What took them so long? I guess since they could not get laws passed they wanted, they are going to do an end run and get the ISP's to do their dirty work.

    The free, unmonitored, unfiltered, open internet we know today will be unrecognizable ten years from now, mark my words.. Bottom line: the internet as we know it is incompatible with controlling, big money corporations. Period. They fear it like the plague, and will never stop at trying to break it, or control it. And they have the resources to do it.

    In places like china and the middle east your internet access is filtered and monitored due to fear of upsetting the government's rule.
    In this - supposedly free country- your internet access is filtered and monitored due to fear of upsetting corporate profits.
    I just can't see the difference.
  • by NoKaOi (1415755) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:08PM (#39372171)

    Can you also sue a bar for entrapment, when you get nailed for driving drunk, when the bar could have simply stopped serving you after one drink?

    Under normal circumstances, of course not. But if the bar has worked out a deal with law enforcement to call them if you have more than one drink, then they might be acting as an agent for said law enforcement agency. If the bartender encourages you to drink more, knowing that you're gonna be driving home, then calls the cops, while acting as an agent for those cops, then that could be entrapment. I'm not saying it's an exact analogy...but just pointing that out.

    Now..a better analogy might be a BYOB bar, where they take a sip of everything you drink to determine alcohol content, then report you to the cops if the alcohol content is too high. It's the sampling of my drink, whether or not it was alcoholic, that I would have a problem with. The difference is that if a bar did that, I simply wouldn't go to that bar, and I doubt many other people would either. With Internet access, most of us don't have the luxury of options.

    One thing I want to know is: What methods are they going use to determine if somebody is pirating?

  • by jd2112 (1535857) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:09PM (#39372185)
    Land of the "free with the purchase of any congressman".
  • Re:Really folks. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jd2112 (1535857) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:15PM (#39372237)
    So copying a Michael Jackson song potentially caries a greater penalty than killing him.
  • Re:Really folks. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by couchslug (175151) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:20PM (#39372283)

    The same reasons you don't.

  • by QuasiSteve (2042606) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:21PM (#39372293)

    This past year I downloaded about 200 movies and liked almost none of them.

    Wait... somewhere after movie #150 that you didn't like you kept thinking "maybe the next one will be awesome!"?

    I guess at least you watched every single one of them yourself to form your own opinion, but surely it can't hurt to start with some reviews?
    Figure out what reviewers you usually agree with and weigh their reviews more heavily, before you download 200 movies the majority of which you could probably have guessed you wouldn't like.

    It would have saved you from bad entertainment, and freed your time for the books and magazines (presuming you don't just download the ebook versions of those, too, of course).

  • by Nyder (754090) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:25PM (#39372351) Journal

    my internet provider isn't a big media player.

    Fuck them and the lobbiest sluts the senators fucked to get us to this point.

  • Re:SSL? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:39PM (#39372521)

    Magnet links do not protect you at all. Torrents as they currently are, contain all available data to get you in trouble.

    Torrents are not encrypted. You can route torrents through an encrypted VPN service, but many VPNs do not like you doing that, and the speed is never as good.

    The solution to avoiding the ISP and legal troubles will come in the form of encrypted sharing networks, where data is randomized, anonymously, either through small groups of people making friends networks (Retroshare look it up) or larger pools of people. The trick is, when do we start setting these encrypted sharing networks up, and how do we all meet, and how do we keep the cops from joining. And if they do, is it really an issue?

    Retroshare and similar programs will allow you to give the big "fuck you" to the RIAA. The trick is, we have to stop using torrents and start forming encrypted communities.

  • by Adrian Lopez (2615) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @08:48PM (#39372619) Homepage

    My guess is that they are doing this in exchange for something

    Given the Obama Administration's involvement [wired.com], I suspect they're doing it under some kind of threat. It's part of a growing trend: regulation without legislation and enforcement completely divorced from the process of law,

  • Re:Really folks. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by geminidomino (614729) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @09:03PM (#39372739) Journal

    If you're going to violate TWO copyrights, though... the murder rap is definitely the better deal.

  • by CohibaVancouver (864662) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @10:26PM (#39373323)

    This past year I downloaded about 200 movies and liked almost none of them

    If you're obviously this difficult to please, why on earth would you keep downloading movies? Once you're on to movie #47 and it's still not to your tastes I think it's time to do something else. Like go for a walk.

  • by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Thursday March 15, 2012 @11:59PM (#39373831)

    Go for foreign films. The MAFIAA doesn't give a damn about piracy of non-MAFIAA products. So get used to reading subtitles and get the added benefit of a brand new perspective on cinema. South Korea, Hong Kong and Japan all have some great filmmakers - and Europe is full of them too. Plus you will get to see the really good stuff years before Hollywood can figure out how to remake it.

"Don't discount flying pigs before you have good air defense." -- jvh@clinet.FI

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