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Crime Idle

Looking For iPad, Police Find 750 Pounds of Meth 195

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the youtube-more-addictive-than-meth dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Hot on the trail of a stolen iPad using the 'Find my iPad' feature in iOS, Police in San Jose tracked the stolen device back to an apartment complex where they then stumbled onto 750 pounds of meth. All told, the meth is worth about $35 million on the street. The seizure was one of the largest drug busts in recent memory."
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Looking For iPad, Police Find 750 Pounds of Meth

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:21AM (#39352907)

    Wait, you mean investigating actual crimes leads to discovery of other, actual crimes?

    SAY IT AIN'T SO

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by kelemvor4 (1980226)

      Wait, you mean investigating actual crimes leads to discovery of other, actual crimes?

      SAY IT AIN'T SO

      I'm not sure theft of an ipad is really a "crime".. more like a "favor" in my opinion.

      • by Pieroxy (222434) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:33AM (#39353097) Homepage

        I'm not sure theft of an ipad is really a "crime".. more like a "favor" in my opinion.

        No no, it is a crime. The damned Apple device sells like hot potatoes on eBay. Its theft represents big bucks lost !

      • by jellomizer (103300) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:41AM (#39353225)
        More to the point that Police should really put more effort into solving the small crimes. As it could lead them to going to the big ones.

        Usually when someone is doing a big crime they will try very hard to cover up all their tracks. When they do a small one or probably more to the case someone else who is doing the small crime will make more mistakes. What probably happened was some dude who needed money for meth stole the iPad and then traded it for Meth to the dealer.
        • Why would you assume that when you know the dealer* could have stolen it as well?

          I think you probably meant broker or something.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by BeerCur (627281)
          Lets see I'll have that big bag of Meth over there, and here is the agreed price of a Million Dollars and an IPad.
        • Good point, that is \i am sure what happened, yet the ipad gps does not worry about who stole it, only that it is stolen and needs to be found.
          I think there should be a cyber unit dedicated to this sort of thing, where the ipad will be used as a decoy to setup the perps, and then track it to the HQ of those perps, of course you need some pretty grungy looking peeps to make the dealer take the ipad from them for a meth trade off.

        • by c++0xFF (1758032)

          Small crimes ... like speeding?

          It's a popular theory that speed traps and other traffic stops are only used to generate cash for the police department. While this is true to some extent, it's also a rather effective method for the police to catch people involved in more significant crimes. Run the plates, check for arrest warrants, and so forth.

          Ever heard of Timothy McVeigh, Ted Bundy, or Dennis Rader? All caught during routine traffic stops.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        "Well, it IS white, overpriced, pushed heavily by dealers, and addictive to the point where criminal activity starts over it. But it weighs more than an iPad. Easy to get confused, boys. Let's head back to the station."

      • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @12:48PM (#39354189)

        My elderly mother has an iPad, the best that has happened to her in a long while. She uses Skype on it to keep in touch with relatives in other cities, keeps all her photos on it, and plays games on it when idle. Stealing it from her wouldn't be just a crime, it would be downright cruel.

        You think you're being funny, but for every show-off and zealot that waves their iPad around as a sign of their superiority, there's another human being who quietly makes good proper use of it.

        • by godel_56 (1287256)

          My elderly mother has an iPad, the best that has happened to her in a long while. She uses Skype on it to keep in touch with relatives in other cities, keeps all her photos on it, and plays games on it when idle. .

          I hope you've told her about the importance of back ups.

  • by Crasoose (1621969) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:21AM (#39352909)
    Even drug lords cannot afford the new insane iPad prices.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Ihmhi (1206036)

      Buying overpriced, shiny toys posing as computers isn't normal...

      . . . . . but on meth it is.

      MAC: Not even once.

      • by MarkvW (1037596)

        That is one of the funniest posts I've read in a long time. Thanks!!

        • by Ihmhi (1206036)

          According to my ex-girlfriend, this is the most recent time I've made anyone happy in the last 5 years. So you're welcome. d=

    • by jellomizer (103300) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:43AM (#39353255)
      Someone else probably stole it and traded it for say $500 worth of drugs. Why take the hassle of waiting in the store when someone else will give it to you for cheap.
      • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @12:07PM (#39353595)

        Actually, they probably traded it to the dealers for about 30 dollars worth of drugs. Usually when people buy or sell stolen goods in a straight up trade for drugs, they get 5-10% of the value.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Mod this up. This is no doubt exactly what happened. People transporting/stashing large amounts of drugs have very important reasons to keep a low profile and not engage in risky, petty crime. They also could afford to buy their own iPad.

        They would have traded for much less than $500 worth though, most likely.

        • Yes, but people stashing 750 pounds of meth usually don't sell such small quantities. Especially not in exchange for stolen goods.
        • Criminals are often dumb and greedy. If you search around you'll be amazed at the number of stories of people carrying lots of drugs getting busted for speeding, or having expired tags, or equally stupid shit. You'd think they would be real careful, but they often aren't.

    • by gnasher719 (869701) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @12:23PM (#39353827)

      Even drug lords cannot afford the new insane iPad prices.

      The actual lesson is: Criminals are bloody stupid. If I had $35 million worth of drugs in a place, I would avoid doing anything that could get the police into my place. Like stealing an iPad. Or even picking one up that someone left on the train or bus.

      • by kbob88 (951258) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @12:49PM (#39354197)

        The actual lesson is: Criminals are bloody stupid. If I had $35 million worth of drugs in a place, I would avoid doing anything that could get the police into my place. Like stealing an iPad. Or even picking one up that someone left on the train or bus.

        They're even stupider than you think. The police didn't have a search warrant, so they just asked if they could come in, and the people in the apartment said yes. Can you believe it? They've got $35mm worth of meth and they invite the cops in? They must have been under the influence of drugs at the time...

        By the way, to give credit where credit is due, it was detectives from Palo Alto who found the meth, not San Jose police, although the apartment was in San Jose.

        • They're even stupider than you think. The police didn't have a search warrant, so they just asked if they could come in, and the people in the apartment said yes. Can you believe it? They've got $35mm worth of meth and they invite the cops in? They must have been under the influence of drugs at the time...

          No drugs, just that damn reality distortion field.

        • by nbritton (823086)

          I wonder if you could use being under the influance of drugs as a defense to invalid the consent to search. Illegal search would, in theory, let them walk.

          • by nbritton (823086)

            You would have to testify that you were on illegal drugs, which would mean shotting yourself in the foot. But that's probably better then being nailed for the distribution of 750 lbs of meth.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by HungryMonkey (1887382)

        The actual lesson is: Criminals are bloody stupid. If I had $35 million worth of drugs in a place, I would avoid doing anything that could get the police into my place.

        Or like letting them in without a warrant. FTA:

        The officers didn't have a search warrant, so they knocked on the door of the apartment and asked the occupants for permission to come in. They consented, Tomkins said.

        But lets be honest, it's not that all criminals are stupid. The smarter ones are currently looking for the original owner of that iPad with some questons about those mp3's he has...

        • by lgw (121541)

          But lets be honest, it's not that all criminals are stupid. The smarter ones are currently looking for the original owner of that iPad with some questons about those mp3's he has...

          That's the most insight comment today!

    • take with Meth for that truly magical experience

  • So the iPad (Score:5, Funny)

    by clickclickdrone (964164) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:23AM (#39352939)
    Had found its way back to Apple HQ?
  • Wait, so there's a drug that's MORE addictive and in-demand than something Apple produces? Who'dathunk?!

  • Makes you wonder how much more of this stuff is out there. Meth is a bad, bad drug.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Meth is a bad, bad drug.

      ...which we prescribe to children...

      http://www.rxlist.com/desoxyn-drug.htm [rxlist.com]

      • Nope, RTFA, this is crystal meth.

      • Re:Depressing (Score:5, Informative)

        by Sarten-X (1102295) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @12:00PM (#39353499) Homepage

        I've been diagnosed with ADHD for the past 12 years or so. For the last 6, I've gone untreated. As an illustration of how screwed-up my body chemistry is, consider that I drink 4 cups of caffeinated coffee daily at work, primarily to reduce the jumpy focus. A short while (30-60 minutes) after my first cup, focusing on a single idea becomes much easier. I'll drink more to maintain that focus through the day. In the late afternoon, I'll sometimes switch to caffeinated soft drinks, mostly for taste. In the evenings, I'll have another caffeinated soft drink, to relax me for sleep. I'll often be happily unconscious by 11.

        ADHD is weird. Stimulants (like caffeine and more potent drugs like methamphetamine) even out the brain chemistry, making people like me closer to normal. For myself, I spent much of my time in college training myself to focus, so the slight assistance of caffeine is all I usually need, but I'm a pretty mild case now. It doesn't surprise me at all that some people are prescribed methamphetamines to slow down.

        • Re:Depressing (Score:5, Informative)

          by phoenix_rizzen (256998) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @12:32PM (#39353941)

          My sister has ADHD. When she was younger (under 12) we used to have to give her hot chocolate or even mochas before bed in order for her to fall asleep. You get some weird looks from people when you say that ("You give her caffeine so she can sleep?"). But it works.

          It's strange how you have to give someone stimulants in order for the body to catch up to the brain, thus evening things out and allowing them to concentrate and "be normal".

          She's now on Dexedrin and , both amphetamines, both stimulants, both used to relax/calm her down enough to get on with her day.

          Yeah, ADHD is a weird chemical imbalance.

        • . For myself, I spent much of my time in college training myself to focus

          Can you elaborate on this? I find at work I am divided among 12 tasks simultaneously. After so many years of this, I've found it hard to sit through a book like I used to and just read cover to cover... instead, I skim and jump around. What exercises did you use? Any online references?

          • by Sarten-X (1102295)

            No references, I'm afraid, but I do know a few things that definitely helped.

            Firstly, I've benefited most from meditation. I spent many years taking dance lessons (every programmer needs a backup career), and at one point worked with an instructor who touted the benefits of meditation. Her technique was to lie on the floor, and focus on relaxing one muscle group at a time, working from the toes to the face, with the idea being that you develop awareness of the separate muscles, and the ability to control th

        • by ifrag (984323)

          For the last 6, I've gone untreated.

          consider that I drink 4 cups of caffeinated coffee daily at work

          So not entirely untreated... unless you only consider prescription drugs to be treatment.

          • by Sarten-X (1102295)

            Perhaps "almost untreated" or "semi-treated" would be better. I do not see a doctor of any kind about it anymore, and I take no regulated medications, both of which I did (along with drinking caffeine) during the first 6 years. Since I come from the medical data field, having no doctor's treatment plan means I consider myself, for data purposes, to be untreated (which is really just "not actively treated according to the currently-accepted medical consensus").

        • by Lando (9348)

          The problem with adhd is that the frontal lob isn't working like it should, by dumping stimulants into the body the brain is stimulated to work. The frontal lob being where impulse control is located, by stimulating it, the ADD/ADHD person actually gains control over their impulses rather than responding to everything else that happens around them.

          While in the military, I used to drink a pot of coffee before bed in order to actually sleep. The biggest problem with regulating your impulse control through c

  • Yes, but... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Sez Zero (586611)
    BUT WHAT ABOUT THE iPAD!?!
    • by Dyinobal (1427207)
      It was involved in a drug bust, it's entirely possible it will vanish into police bureaucracy and be claimed by someone who has no business having it and any attempts to claim it by the actual owner will be met with lots of indirect and passive resistance. AKA redtape.
  • by FudRucker (866063) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:41AM (#39353223)
    Sure they call em Apples but it is really a Gateway drug,
  • by PPH (736903) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:42AM (#39353227)

    ... in the war to stamp out addictive substances that are destroying our youth!

    And they found some meth as well.

  • by Nadaka (224565) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @11:43AM (#39353241)

    This would be funny if it was lost in the owners own apartment.

    • or if someone stole an ipad and placed it in their apartment as a high tech way to give an anonymous tip to the police!

  • Unfortunately for Apple, this is yet more proof that their products are a gateway drug.

    First you get a free iTunes card, so you need some free software from Apple.

    Then you realize that iTunes doesn't support yout Zune, so you get an iPod Nano next time around.

    Before you realize it, you're knee deep in stolen iPads and $25M in high-grade meth.

  • The real tragedy here is to think of how many cold symptoms could have been avoided if that meth had been allowed to remain unadulterated in its beautiful unsullied pseudophedrine form.

    Meth must really be a hell of a drug. People are willingly converting PSE into meth, which logically leads to the conclusion that meth is even better than NyQuil. I didn't think such a thing was possible.

  • by Rich0 (548339) on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @12:21PM (#39353803) Homepage

    Often local police don't pursue small crimes like theft. They don't fingerprint cars that have stolen radios, or follow-up when you report your cell phone stolen (despite the fact that it probably broadcasts a GUID and is GPS trackable with a warrant).

    However, going after small crimes can be a way to go after big crimes. Somebody who has stolen an iPad could very well be into some other crime, and when you walk into their house anything in plain sight is fair game. Plus there is the whole bit about nipping problems in the bud - the teenager stealing radios today could be trading in guns in a few years.

    Sure, fingerprinting the car with a stolen radio costs more than replacing the radio, but the goal isn't to replace the radio - it is to deter real crime, and send the message that stealing is going to get you in trouble.

  • 750 pounds? (Score:5, Funny)

    by david.given (6740) <dg AT cowlark DOT com> on Wednesday March 14, 2012 @01:12PM (#39354533) Homepage Journal
    750 pounds is 35 million dollars? Has the value of the dollar against the pound slipped again?
  • "The bust was worth...
    throws dart at board full of absurd, freshly ass-pulled numbers
    $35 million dollars!!"
  • Wow, slashdot (or submitters) are getting slow. This happened at least 11 days ago (the article cited was posted 11 days ago). I read about it in the paper then (yes, dead tree stuff).

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