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Facebook On Collision Course With New EU Privacy Laws 195

Posted by Soulskill
from the ramming-speed dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Facebook and other U.S. internet companies are faced with a new EU data protection regime, the Christian Science Monitor reports. U.S. concepts of free expression and commerce will battle European support for privacy and state legislation. 'Companies must understand that if they want access to 500 million consumers in the EU, then they have to comply. This is not an option,' said a spokesman for the EU Justice Commissioner."
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Facebook On Collision Course With New EU Privacy Laws

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  • -1 Flamebait (Score:5, Interesting)

    by peppepz (1311345) on Saturday February 04, 2012 @03:21AM (#38925133)
    "U.S. concepts of free expression and commerce will battle European support for privacy and state legislation."? Really?

    Was this summary explicitly written in trollspeak to ignite yet another US vs Europe flamewar on /. ?

  • by mosb1000 (710161) <mosb1000@mac.com> on Saturday February 04, 2012 @03:42AM (#38925215)

    I never understood the objection to targeted advertising. I don't particularly enjoy sitting through adds for tampons, dating services, or political candidates. But I quite like ads for electronics, camping gear, movies, cars and things like that. So why wouldn't I want a website to know what kinds of ads interest me? Targeted ads are greatly preferable to general ads.

    I'll be in favor of a "right to be forgotten" if it applies to the government and banks. Otherwise, it's not really worth it.

  • by Frans Faase (648933) on Saturday February 04, 2012 @05:12AM (#38925517) Homepage
    I think a bigger problem is that this new privacy directed is also in conflict with the Patriot Act. If I understand it correctly, the Patriot Act allows the USA government to seize any data (no matter where it is being hosted in the world) from any company that has a legal entity in the USA. The new privacy directive does not allow any government to size this data. To me it seems that any company that has a legal entity in the USA can no longer store any private (customer) data of people falling under the laws of to the EU.
  • Interesting POV (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Registered Coward v2 (447531) on Saturday February 04, 2012 @08:31AM (#38926311)

    'Companies must understand that if they want access to 500 million consumers in the EU, then they have to comply. This is not an option,' said a spokesman for the EU Justice Commissioner."

    The EU is essentially claiming that accessibility of a site to EU users subjects the site to EU laws. That's the same argument that the US uses to go after overseas sites that violate US law. While privacy is certainly a valid concern, the overall concept is a dangerous one. If a company doesn't have a physical prince in a location should it be subject to local laws? Should the government where it is located enforce foreign judgements?

If the code and the comments disagree, then both are probably wrong. -- Norm Schryer

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