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Censorship Crime Privacy The Internet Your Rights Online

Cybercrime Treaty Pushes Surveillance Worldwide 89

Posted by timothy
from the man-v-state dept.
bs0d3 writes "As part of an emerging international trend to try to 'civilize the Internet', one of the world's worst Internet law treaties — the highly controversial Council of Europe (CoE) Convention on Cybercrime — is back on the agenda. Canada and Australia are using the Treaty to introduce new invasive, online surveillance laws, many of which go far beyond the Convention's intended levels of intrusiveness. Negotiated over a decade ago, only 31 of its 47 signatories have ratified it. Many considered the Treaty to be dormant but in recent years a number of countries have been modeling national laws based on the flawed Treaty. Leaving out constitutional safeguards, gag orders in place of oversight, and forcing service providers to retain your data may all be coming soon."
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Cybercrime Treaty Pushes Surveillance Worldwide

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  • by mlts (1038732) * on Thursday August 25, 2011 @06:17PM (#37213124)

    Then proxy server providers get told to keep logs just like the ISPs to be perused at leisure by any LEO, who desires it. The guy who got into Palin's Yahoo used a VPN server, and those guys were more than willing to burn him when the Feds came knocking.

  • by TheCarp (96830) <sjc&carpanet,net> on Thursday August 25, 2011 @06:33PM (#37213236) Homepage

    Um.... extensions other than Subject Alternative Name? Because, that has worked fine for a few years now (in browsers, and a few other places anyway).

    With a SAN the certificate just simply lists ALL vhosts that it supports. So, while an eavesdropper can see what site you are going to, he can only see it as one of the several sites that you might possibly be going to.

    Of course, Verisign makes sure to ass rape you solidly if you want SANs, but that is almost redundant since, they always try to provide that service.

    -Steve

I judge a religion as being good or bad based on whether its adherents become better people as a result of practicing it. - Joe Mullally, computer salesman

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