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8GB of Data Stolen From Italian Cybercrime Unit 123

Posted by timothy
from the what's-itallian-for-engrish? dept.
Orome1 writes "Evidence servers of the Italian National Anti-Cybercrime Center for the Protection of Critical Infrastructure (CNAIPIC) have been breached and some of their contents published by a group of hackers calling themselves 'Legion of Anonymous Doom,' who apparently got on board the AntiSec campaign. The group has made clear that its sitting on around eight GB of stolen data and that it plans to release it all."
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8GB of Data Stolen From Italian Cybercrime Unit

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  • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @02:54AM (#36880826) Journal
    Well... The Italians do have a lot of experience with 'protecting' critical infrastructure. It'd be a pity if it caught fire, after all...
  • From the title... (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @02:54AM (#36880830)

    8GB of Data Stolen sounds like a USB flash drive was stolen

    • Look a flash drive! Lets see whats in it.

      It seems it came from Italian National Anti-Cybercrime Center. Lets wreck havock and say that we hacked their data.

      • by mcgrew (92797) *

        I got a grin out of that typoo. ;)

        "Look, someone wreaked havoc! Lest wreck the havoc someone wreaked!"

        Wreck havoc and lose the dogs of war!

        • Since we already have a pedant at work here, I guess I might as well mention that a more correct form for the past tense of "wreak" is "wrought".

          HTH ;-)
          • by mcgrew (92797) *

            True, but that would spoil the joke.

        • There was a light bomber in World War II called the Douglas A20 Havoc. I would guess that quite a few of them were wrecked.(by being shot down
          (In RAF service the were called the Boston)

    • by Jonah Hex (651948)

      and nothing of value was lost....

      • by Chrisq (894406)

        and nothing of value was lost....

        That USB drive had my porn stash on it, you insensitive clod.

        • by Jonah Hex (651948)

          and you only had 8 gigs of porn? Did you just get internet yesterday? :P

          HEX

        • Porn stolen from a 'cybercrime unit' are most likely to be child pornography. In your place, i would not claim ownership of that USB drive...
          • by trum4n (982031)
            You're inferring that a cyber-crime division has ever been successful. And that's a LOT of inferring.
            • You're inferring that a cyber-crime division has ever been successful. And that's a LOT of inferring.

              It doesn't take a "cybersecurity expert" to find child porn. It's almost harder NOT to find underage self-shots by (mostly) girls with low self-esteem.

              I've heard.

              *cough*

              Uhm. Think of the children!!

          • As someone who has to adhere to NDAs and thus can't really say more, let me only say this: You're WAY off. It's not most likely CP. It's not even close to most likely. You'd probably be very surprised if you saw what kind of porn you'll find in their evidence vault.

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      TFS looks like a bad google translation. Maybe it's because I'm on my first cup this morning, but ""Evidence servers of the Italian National Anti-Cybercrime Center for the Protection of Critical Infrastructure (CNAIPIC) have been breached" doesn't parse. There are some adverbs missing or something. Should it have read ""there is Evidence that servers of the Italian National Anti-Cybercrime Center for the Protection of Critical Infrastructure (CNAIPIC) have been breached"? Or was it "The 'evidence' servers o

    • by rubycodez (864176)
      sounded to me like a dual layer dvd of pirated Iiona Staller porn
  • Hey, maybe it's the kids' way of saying they're in search of a job. If I were the italians, I'd sit down with them and see what they can do for the (Italian|American|NATO... ) govt - as they can obviously do quite a bit and clearly more than their employed, university educated cybersecurity "specialists". 2c/
    • Re:Hint (Score:5, Insightful)

      by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @03:06AM (#36880884) Journal
      That can, and sometimes does, work with the 'bored kids poking stuff because they can' flavor of hackers; but is not obviously a winning strategy with more ideologically motivated ones:

      If somebody has nothing against you personally, a comparatively small amount of money, some positive social feedback, and the chance to not get sodomized in prison, can often turn them into a useful and productive security researcher.

      If somebody does have something against you personally, taking them onboard just means that you can be more or less certain that you have an insider threat, rather than it merely being a possibility, as before.
    • No. Just no. No way, no chance, not a moment I'd consider someone like this for a security job.

      Why? Because I cannot trust them. I cannot trust them not to break the law, and very obviously I cannot trust them to at least shut up about it. And the very last thing I need is my security group being associated with black hat hacking.

  • by Scarletdown (886459) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @02:57AM (#36880838) Journal

    Was it actually stolen, as in it no longer exists on CNAIPIC's computers, or was it simply copied?

  • by bennett000 (2028460) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @02:57AM (#36880850) Journal
    strange that manifestos and data dumps from pastebin have become normal news http://pastebin.com/r21cExeP [pastebin.com]
    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @03:10AM (#36880898) Journal

      I'm not surprised that the BBC article didn't link to the pastebin source.
      When is 'big media' going to figure out that, on the internet, you can cite your sources?

    • by Tei (520358)

      I have noticed, too.

      I think pastebin works somewhat like AnonOps news and Twitter. Withouth the size limits of Twitter.

      Some dude X can upload a text to pastebin. And some dude Y can link to it, and make it public. Is anonymous and searchable (google index it).
      Since is indexed in google Y can be a person that don't know X. X could have find the paste in google, and be one of the first to be reporting it. Since soon a lot of people will cite the link, no one can know whos the first poster of the link.

      Tha

  • It's the silliest thing I've ever heard. Taking possession of the data and then threatening to publish it? Or what? It smells like Mafia-ish blackmail or "protection", but what's the payout?

    Seriously: if they aren't pushing for some kind of concession on the part of the data owners, the best thing they could have done was just publish the information FIRST, then STFU. Or take credit for it afterward, if their egos simply couldn't stand the pressure. But announce it FIRST, and threaten to publish it LATER
    • They aren't threatening to publish it, they've put up some documents to substantiate their claim and have said they will publish it.

      Seeing as they didn't make any demands in that press release, I think they're seeking media hype rather than attempting extortion.
      • "... they've put up some documents to substantiate their claim and have said they will publish it."'

        Ahem... excuse me... that's called a "threat". Until it's published, that's all it is: a threat.

        "Seeing as they didn't make any demands in that press release, I think they're seeking media hype rather than attempting extortion."

        That's precisely what's so silly. They could get the identical amount of attention by just publishing it, rather than threatening to, and inviting some kind of harsh intervention.

        • by icebraining (1313345) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @04:14AM (#36881170) Homepage

          This lasts longer - they get the attention due to the threat, and due to the actual release.

        • by geekoid (135745)

          It's not a threat. a threat involves an act of coercion. It's a statement.

          No talking about publishing gets you more attention from more source because those source have more time to find out about it, so when you do publisher, you have a bigger audience. had the just published it, it would have been a blurb in a few news articles and nothing more.

          • "It's not a threat. a threat involves an act of coercion. It's a statement."

            No, it doesn't. It can, but it doesn't have to. Look it up.

            A threat can be in retaliation for something prior, for example (says so right there in the dictionary). In which case there is no coercion involved at all. In this case, the data release is pretty clearly in retaliation for a perceived wrong.

    • Can't tell if trolling, or commenting without having read the article.

      As far as we've come with internet related technology, 8gb is still a lot of data. They need to actually sort it and make it available for download. One guy with an old laptop as the only seed of an 8gb torrent isn't going to work very well. Also, they made it clear that this is a preview of things to come. Even if you didn't click through to the pastebin, if you bothered to read the article, you would have noticed this line:

      "The gr
      • "Can't tell if trolling, or commenting without having read the article."

        Neither. I was making a comment about their stupid actions.

        Look it up. If you've "made it clear" you're going to do something, but haven't actually done it, it's called a "threat". It's a pretty simple concept. Until you do it, it is nothing more than a threat.

        I have a dictionary you might want to attend: "Threat: n a declaration of an intention or determination to inflict punishment, injury, etc., in retaliation for, or conditionally upon, some action or course; menace."

        Is that clear enough for you?

        • Damn typos.
        • You can't attend a dictionary. A dictionary is not an event.
          • "Attend" is a bit more flexible a word than you give it credit for. It means "to give your attention to".
            • That would be "attend to". You can attend to an object. You cannot attend an object.
              • "Attend" is a verb. It means "give your attention to" something. So you can attend anything you damned well please. Stop trying to split hairs, especially when you're wrong.
          • by mcgrew (92797) *

            Can't tell if [insert adverb here] trolling, or commenting without having read the article
            You can't attend a dictionary. A dictionary is not an event.
            I teach an ESL class you might want to attend.

            I think if I was trying to learn English, I'd rather have a native speaker as an instructor.

  • Is this a case for SuperWikiLeaks?
  • by MimeticLie (1866406) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @03:05AM (#36880880)
    The summary (and article) say that the attack was motivated by the AntiSec movement, but the group's release [pastebin.com] has more specific claims. Namely that:

    This corrupted organization gathered all the evidence from the seized property of suspected computer professional entertainers and utilized it over many years to conduct illegal operations with foreign intelligence agencies and oligarchy to facilitate their lust for power and money, they never used obtained evidence to really support ongoing investigations.

    Also, it's nice to see that CNAIPIC subscribes to the "big useless video wall" [imgur.com] school of command center design. (there are also diagrams of their network architecture in that album)

    • I really love the ergonomic excellence of this one [imgur.com]...

      "Yo. dudes, as a stopgap until you get get some sort of 3D gesture-based 'cyber-space' interface up and running, go find 6 or 8 of the l33t3st looking network monitoring programs, then run them all on a big screen at the front of the room, far enough away from all the operators that nobody can read any of the text without intense eyestrain..."
      • by 1s44c (552956) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @07:01AM (#36881902)

        I really love the ergonomic excellence of this one [imgur.com]...

        "Yo. dudes, as a stopgap until you get get some sort of 3D gesture-based 'cyber-space' interface up and running, go find 6 or 8 of the l33t3st looking network monitoring programs, then run them all on a big screen at the front of the room, far enough away from all the operators that nobody can read any of the text without intense eyestrain..."

        This is an overfunded government department. That huge video screen exists to look high tech, make managers feel good and justify their huge budget for next year.

        If they had any sense they would buy two normal widescreens per desk and spend the savings on employing someone who can fix those nagios errors on the bottom right.

        • Given that the color balance on each of the six sub-panels making up the big screen is glaringly different even in that fairly lousy photograph, they can't be too overfunded. It isn't quite as skeezy looking as an old 3-tube rear projection unit that has started to drift out of alignment; but it is still pretty dire.
        • by phorm (591458)

          Actually, if you're running a system monitoring app, having a big screen in your monitoring/operations center does have an important purpose.

          Most monitoring systems use some form of color-coded status, so green=good, red=bad. Now if your one of the important systems that monitoring depends on goes down (say your mail server or SMS gateway, whatever), you're not going to be getting those important alerts when stuff breaks. However, if you've still got the "big wall of status" up, then there's still a decent

    • I mean why not just call it the "anti police" movement, or the "anti government" movement.

      Who exactly benefits from an anti-sec movement? Hackers don't generally benefit from it. Users don't generally benefit from it. Who benefits from it?

      If you are a hacker and a teenager, someday you'll be working in the security industry. So basically you'll be killing your job prospects if you support such a movement and you'll be making it impossible for hackers in the future to ever go legit. This is like drug dealers

      • Or arm up and start a revolution. Egypt has won democracy this way.

        Anarchy IS democracy and the preferred political system for lulzsec, anonymous, Kevin Mitnick and alike. Death to the Jew World Order masqueraded as law and order.

        • by elucido (870205) *

          Or arm up and start a revolution. Egypt has won democracy this way.

          Anarchy IS democracy and the preferred political system for lulzsec, anonymous, Kevin Mitnick and alike. Death to the Jew World Order masqueraded as law and order.

          LMAO. Revolution? I think you mean a civil war. The USA isn't Egypt. There isn't/aren't a CIA or other NATO or other intelligence agencies waiting to arm the so called cyber revolutionaries, and you'll have no country to flee to if you start losing.

    • Sounds like they want (pinky to corner of mouth) One Million Dollars!

  • by TubeSteak (669689) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @03:05AM (#36880882) Journal

    Governments are going to have to get used to operating under a bright light as these hacks and leaks keep happening.
    There's just so much sensitive information, accessible to huge numbers of people, and scattered across so many poorly secured systems.

    • Who cares about governments? Corporations write the fkn laws.

  • by unity100 (970058) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @03:12AM (#36880912) Homepage Journal
    In our time, the only ones not informed about their governments' doings are the citizens. this means, us. all the supposed enemies have capabilities to acquire information that is supposedly 'secret'. only, we, 'the people' dont.

    its high time we started to learn what is being done with our taxes.
  • by subreality (157447) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @03:23AM (#36880962)

    Pre-release announcements are *getting old*. Please save it for when you have something that's going to be really earthshaking. The Pope rape tapes. Oswald's gunsight cam. The Illuminati's member list. Proof that not only does God exist, but he's being detained in Gitmo.

    Y'know, shit that could start a war.

    For anything else, please just post the torrent already, okay?

    • Torrent hashes in the DHT should have tags, so your torrent client can comb through the torrent hases automatically downloading those tags.

  • by X10 (186866)

    It's Italy, what can you expect? A country that had a prime minister - Andreotti - who turned out to be a mobster? A country where the current prime minister owns all TV stations?

    • by ledow (319597)

      Better yet - one that can't organise refuse collections in Naples because the resident Mafia are the incumbent refuse collectors, and they just dump it around the country wherever they like (including commercial/toxic waste).

      Naples has been up to its neck in household rubbish for a few years now, to the point where the residents are marching in front of government buildings demanding a cleanup.

      • Power without accountability is a terrible thing. Police for instance has power, so they must be accountable. But voters also have great power... but how are they held accountable? How are the voters for Berlusconi held to account for their actions?

        That is why democracy is flawed. In a dictatorship you only need one responsible person. In a democracy you need millions.

        • The problem, of course, is ensuring that the responsible person is somehow allocated the position of dictator, a fate which befalls those you would want having it with starkly limited frequency...

          As for accountability in democracy, the theory is that voters are held accountable by giving them what they asked for. Good and hard.This doesn't help much in the case of majoritarian repression of a minority(which is why absolute democracies along Athenian lines fell out of favor with the Enlightenment set, and
        • by tehcyder (746570)

          Power without accountability is a terrible thing. Police for instance has power, so they must be accountable. But voters also have great power... but how are they held accountable? How are the voters for Berlusconi held to account for their actions?

          That is why democracy is flawed. In a dictatorship you only need one responsible person. In a democracy you need millions.

          And the flaw of dictatorship is that a single person is never flawless. Oh, let's take a guess, I suppose you are?

        • by Nidi62 (1525137)

          Power without accountability is a terrible thing. Police for instance has power, so they must be accountable. But voters also have great power... but how are they held accountable? How are the voters for Berlusconi held to account for their actions?

          That is why democracy is flawed. In a dictatorship you only need one responsible person. In a democracy you need millions.

          They are held accountable when the people/things they irresponsibly voted for go horribly wrong. To quote someone that is rather controversial here on slashdot: "To vote is to wield authority, the supreme authority from which all other authority derives...[and] the converse of authority [is] responsibility....To permit irresponsible authority is to sow disaster...If [you vote] the impossible, the disastrous possible happens instead."

          Democracy itself is not flawed, it is one of, if not the best system of g

  • by ks9208661 (1862000) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @04:34AM (#36881240)
    ...I wonder if there's a Hall of Anonymous Justice.

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