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NH Man Arrested For Videotaping Police.. Again 666

Posted by Soulskill
from the at-least-he's-consistent dept.
OhPlz writes "Back in 2006, a resident of New Hampshire's second largest city was arrested while at the police station attempting to file a complaint against officers. His crime? He had video tape evidence of the officers' wrongdoings. According to the police, that's wiretapping. After world wide attention, the police dropped the charges. His complaint was found to be valid, but the evidence never saw the light of day. Well, guess what? Round two. There are differing reports, but again the police arrested Mr. Gannon and again, they seized his video camera. This time it's 'falsifying evidence' because he tried to hand off the camera, most likely to protect its contents. If there's the potential of police wrongdoing, how is it that the law permits the police to seize the evidence?"
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NH Man Arrested For Videotaping Police.. Again

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  • by suso (153703) * on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:15PM (#36817708) Homepage Journal

    What do you mean police wrongdoing? Can you use those two words in a sentence?

    • I think the writer got arrested for using them!

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Jackbooted Rethuglicans at work. Most "police officers", if they hadn't slipped through the academy, would be working as leg-breakers for the local Mafia. Half of them are anyways as a sideline while off duty.

        It's about "power", not honor and law enforcement.

        Small wonder they don't want to be videotaped. At an intersection by my house, we had a particularly egregious asshole who found a way to fill his quota: he parked his car 45 degrees down an alley to make sure his dashboard camera wasn't covering the ne

  • by Scareduck (177470) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:19PM (#36817768) Homepage Journal

    ... I reckon "die" is all that's left.

  • by pclminion (145572) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:20PM (#36817776)

    Evidence of what? Evidence of him having videotaped officers? This makes as much sense as when the police arrest someone on the sole charge of "resisting arrest." He was resisting arrest. Why were you arresting him? For resisting arrest. Do they really think anyone buys that?

    • by Mr. Underbridge (666784) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:28PM (#36817870)
      I think it would be better to accuse him of truifying evidence.
    • by haulbag (1160391) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:41PM (#36817982) Homepage

      "Gannon was charged with resisting arrest, simple assault on a police officer and disorderly conduct."

      The original charge seems to be disorderly conduct. Whatever he shouted at the police while they were driving by, plus whatever he said prior to being tackled is probably what the disorderly conduct was about.

      If you ask me, they probably would have arrested him for saying "Booo!"

  • by DaMattster (977781) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:21PM (#36817782)
    We are moving at an avalanche pace towards a police state!
  • lulz (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:21PM (#36817784)

    It's quite obvious. Cops are here to serve and protect, themselves, above all else. You don't take videotaped evidence of police wrongdoing to the police, that's the last thing you do. You think there would have been riots in LA had there not been a helicopter overhead filming police beating the shit out of Rodney King? Dashcam footage of that beating would have never seen the light of day. First thing you do when you have video evidence of police wrongdoing, you upload it to the internet. Plain and simple.

    • by ClintJCL (264898)
      helicopter? huh? Check your brain. The only helicopter videos related to that were of the riots.
    • ... we'll have sufficient bandwidth that video shot from a mobile device can be uploaded straight to the web, with only a brief "buffering" stop on the actual filming device. Then they can confiscate the device as much as they like, but the video will be beyond their grasp due to the technical difficulty of 1) figuring out where it went, 2) getting the host to take it down, and 3) doing so before the original filmer (or friends) can spread copies of it all over everywhere.

      Shortly after that, some bright l

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      Quite certain it was video footage from a citizen filming from their housing complex adjacent to the parking lot where the beating occurred...yeah. Not suggesting your point is wrong but atleast attempt to post informative and factual information lest you become as factual as Fox News...not a good look
  • by bigtallmofo (695287) * on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:27PM (#36817856)
    Once when I was 16 and a huge smartass, I yelled, "I smell bacon!" out the window of a car I was a passenger in. There was a cop on the side of the road that had someone pulled over. I see him drop everything, run back to his car and get back into it. I thought there was no way he would ever catch us, and anyway I thought yelling out the window was not illegal. He didn't try to catch us - instead he radioed ahead to someone else who pulled us over within a few minutes. The cop comes up to the car, says, "Which one of you yelled, 'I'm going to kill you fucking cops'"? We played it off like it was the radio and said nobody yelled that out the window. Anyway, they took all our names, made us get out of the car, the whole nine yards. For yelling, "I smell bacon" at a cop. I guess we were luck we didn't get beat up, tazed, maced and put in jail like this guy.
    • by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:50PM (#36818078)

      I've learned not to yell anything at cops.
      I guess we were lucky we didn't get beat up, tazed, maced and put in jail like this guy.

      That's the wrong lesson. What you should have learned is that people with power tend to abuse it, even for the most trivial of things.

      • What you should have learned is that people with power tend to abuse it, even for the most trivial of things.

        Yes, hence my long-standing tradition of passive-aggressive revenge tactics against authority figures.

    • by trout007 (975317)

      That reminds me of a good to protect and serve story. I was at college and I was in the labs until about 3am on a weekday. I was driving back to my apartment on an lonely little dark road on campus where I could see the whole road. I took a few turns aggressively blowing off some steam, there were no cars in sight. Except for the cop car parked in the dark. These two guys pulled me over and I unfortunately didn't know my rights so when they asked to search my car I said ok. They pulled everything out that w

    • by argStyopa (232550)

      What's funny is that you were being a douche, got called on it, and somehow feel you're the victim.

      You weren't tazed, shot, jailed, beaten, or anything.

      You were INCONVENIENCED. Oh noes!

      Here's a test: drive by, and shout a random comment to a bunch of MS-13's in Los Angeles. Trust me, you won't merely be 'inconvenienced' by their response.

      Perhaps your post should have been titled, "I've learned not to be a dick that yells at people as they/I drive by"

  • Police state (Score:5, Insightful)

    by gstrickler (920733) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:28PM (#36817868)
    If people, especially authorities can't be recorded when in public, then there is nothing to prevent them from abusing their authority, doing anything they wish, and lying about it. I most places around the US, the police video tape the public every time they stop a vehicle. The public has the same right, no matter what laws they try to create or enforce to prevent you from taping them. When they're in public, you have the right to record their actions. If not, then you're already living in a police state.
    • by Psyborgue (699890)

      If people, especially authorities can't be recorded when in public, then there is nothing to prevent them from abusing their authority, doing anything they wish, and lying about it.

      That's the way it is right now. Cameras, especially internet connected cameras, threaten the status quo.

    • by girlintraining (1395911) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @08:04PM (#36818180)

      If people, especially authorities can't be recorded when in public, then there is nothing to prevent them from abusing their authority, doing anything they wish, and lying about it

      The police report says he was yelling a lot just before he fell down a bunch of stairs filled with tasers, mace, boots and car hoods and that when officers helped him up, he tried to pass his camcorder off to someone standing nearby, who also fell down the stairs. I find it really hard to understand why you're blaming the police for defective stairs...

    • Re:Police state (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Maltheus (248271) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @08:16PM (#36818258)

      If people, especially authorities can't be recorded when in public, then there is nothing to prevent them from abusing their authority, doing anything they wish, and lying about it.

      We've had C-SPAN for decades and it hasn't done anything to restrain congress from abusing its authority.

      But of course I agree, we do have the right to monitor our employees.

    • Re:Police state (Score:5, Informative)

      by SethJohnson (112166) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @08:20PM (#36818288) Homepage Journal

      the police video tape the public every time they stop a vehicle.

      In Austin, Texas, when the police shoot someone they've pulled over, they are allowed to review the dash camera [theppsc.org] before having to give a statement or answer any questions about the incident. This policy was instituted by police chief Art Acevedo to ensure that the descriptions of the incidents given by officers would align with the video taped evidence. Civilians are not afforded this privilege, however.

      Seth

      • by russotto (537200)

        In Austin, Texas, when the police shoot someone they've pulled over, they are allowed to review the dash camera before having to give a statement or answer any questions about the incident. This policy was instituted by police chief Art Acevedo to ensure that the descriptions of the incidents given by officers would align with the video taped evidence. Civilians are not afforded this privilege, however.

        Actually, they are. It's called the Fifth Amendment. If you assert it long enough, it becomes moot bec

  • by physicsdot (530505) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:33PM (#36817918)
    We need a "National Record the Police in Public Day". I think that a public event like this would enforce the point far more strongly that the police losing an occasional lawsuit.
    • by NFN_NLN (633283)

      We need a "National Record the Police in Public Day". I think that a public event like this would enforce the point far more strongly that the police losing an occasional lawsuit.

      There are a lot of the days that are meaningless. But this I could really get behind. +1

    • We need a "National Record the Police in Public Day". I think that a public event like this would enforce the point far more strongly that the police losing an occasional lawsuit.

      Watch as a few of the more corrupt departments announce a "Put the picture and name of anyone filming us into NCIC tagged as a troublemaker Day."

  • by skywire (469351) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:33PM (#36817920)

    This time it's 'falsifying evidence' because he tried to hand off the camera

    Preserving it is falsifying it? Orwell had nothing on this.

  • Douchebags (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Mullen (14656) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:35PM (#36817930)

    NASHUA – Maybe Michael Gannon shouldn’t have given lip to two police detectives that afternoon.

    But Gannon claims he wouldn’t have said a word on July 1 if a detective – unprovoked, Gannon said – hadn’t shouted something at him as their unmarked police car passed by on Canal Street.

    Sounds like a couple of douche bags yelling at each other. The police should not be yelling anything at anyone unless it is part of their job and Mr. Gannon should just learn to ignore stupid comments. If either of these two people had the slightest bit of decorum, it would be a non-issue.

    However, Mr. Gannon will win. The police don't seem to have much of a case to stop him in the first place. And while being a douche is dumb, it is not against the law.

  • by sustik (90111) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:36PM (#36817942)

    I wonder how long before there will be iphone and android emergency apps which record a video
    and instantly upload (stream) it to the internet. I suggest the names: Evidence, Police Check Mate, Truthful
    Police, Little Brother.

    If you develop this app please *do not* credit me with the idea...

    • Re:New app (Score:5, Informative)

      by mysidia (191772) * on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:41PM (#36817988)
      You mean like Gandhicam [gandhicam.org] ?
    • Re:New app (Score:4, Informative)

      by Oliver Wendell Jones (158103) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:43PM (#36818006)
      How about if they call it "www.qik.com [qik.com]" and the corresponding free apps that go with it. Oh wait, they've already done that...
      • by sustik (90111)

        Gandhicam is for android only and not yet available through the marketplace. But thanks I will give it a try!
        "Currently Gandhicam for Android is a beta version, meaning it is still under active development, and not yet considered ready for widespread use. However, it is installed and working on several project-members' handsets, and has yet to cause a single issue. It also does nothing which could potentially cause data-loss or corruption, so it should be perfectly safe to install and play with, regardless

    • by mark-t (151149)
      Probably only for android. It is unlikely that Apple would ever approve such an app if that purpose was even implied.
  • I thought this is the sort of thing the DA's office was for?
  • Fuck The Police (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:41PM (#36817994)

    Fuck The Police

  • by erroneus (253617) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:53PM (#36818100) Homepage

    Among these are abuse of "wire tapping" laws which must be reformed in states that require two party consent. Recording public events is not and should never be considered wire tapping. Where is the wire? Where was it being tapped?

    This case needs to go to trial and speedily. Police dropping charges only means that they are free to continue their harassment and terrorizing.

    People need to make copies of their videos before presenting them as evidence anywhere. One should go to the FBI, others to news organizations and still more somewhere online. (There must be a service somewhere that allows hosting of large encrypted files which can then be made available to all with a key file kinda like the wikileaks thing.)

    All of this wrong really gets under my skin sometimes. When you have to defend yourself against police, things have gone way too far.

  • I like New Hampshire. "Live Free or Die". New Hampshire used to stamp it into the license plates on every car. I liked that. I also liked The Old Man of the Mountain [wikipedia.org].

    Now, i like this guy. Balls made of granite.

  • by failedlogic (627314) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:57PM (#36818134)

    Sorry but this dude is asking for it. He has a similar last name to the bad guy from the Zelda games. The cops are doing us a favor. Think of the children!

  • by ThePeices (635180) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @07:58PM (#36818140)

    Wiretapping? Why not call it tax evasion, or driving while under the influence of drugs? They all have absolutely nothing to do with videotaping police.

    What "wire" was "tapped"?

  • by Required Snark (1702878) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @09:16PM (#36818674)
    Why not go all the way and make individual police unrecognizable? That way they will never have to constrain their actions, because they can always say "it wasn't me, but some other masked officer." No badge number, no face, no accountability. That's what the cops really want.

    The current situation in New Hampshire is only a difference of degree, no a difference of kind, from anonymous officers. If it the word of a uniformed cop against a civilian, and there is no other evidence, then the cop wins. It takes either a lot of witnesses, or a video to show that a cop is lying. If you let the cops stop video, you have no effective rights.

  • by IHC Navistar (967161) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @09:39PM (#36818806)

    The way to get around all of this "wiretapping" crap, aside from a judge who beats some common sense into police chiefs with his gavel, is simple:

    A small red led, either flashing or continuous, on the recording device, or.....

    A t-shirt that says "Audio / Video Monitoring In Progress", or both.

    If you want to cover your ass while driving, place a reflective sticker right next to your license plate that reads: "This vehicle equipped with active audio / visual recording devices.". The officer won't be able to claim, unless he is blind, that he didn't see the duly posted notice. Hell, you'd even be able to see it on the officer's dashcam recording. Be vague yet accurate and truthful to the officer if he asks you about being recorded (don't be a total dick, especially if you really did run the stop sign and are trying to cover your ass, as it will look bad in court).

    Officer: Am I being recorded?
    Driver: Yes, that is why I posted the sticker on my car, right next to my license plate.
    Officer: You do realize that it is interfering with my investigation and traffic stop, don't you?
    Driver: No, I don't. How is it interfering with your investigation and traffic stop?
    Officer: You might use the recording improperly.
    Driver: Like how?
    Officer: Where is the recording?
    Driver: It's being streamed to servers in Havana, Cuba, with the added bonus that they don't have an extradition treaty with the U.S. It's also available streaming from Hulu, but people only watch the good ones the whole way through.
    Officer: Good ones?
    Driver: You know, where the cop goes ballistic about being videotaped by some bystander from 50 yards away, and then confiscates his phone and tries to arrest him on charges of wiretapping, invasion of privacy, interfering, tax evasion, lion taming, etc., then simultaneously "loses" both the phone recording and the squad car's dash cam tapes. It only works because those idiots didn't post any notice that they were recording the cops. Which is why I posted notice. .....

  • by lexsird (1208192) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @09:56PM (#36818936)

    When this war is over, and the vets get home, how long before some kingshit cop pushes the wrong one around? How are our troops going to like the fact our freedoms are in the toilet in spite of the fact they went to fight a war to preserve them? I am starting to think they are keeping them overseas on purpose, so that they don't have to worry about them revolting or aiding insurrections or starting them here. Our military is sworn to uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States. That means if politicians start trashing the Constitution, they have not only the right, but the duty to put a fucking bullet in their heads.

    These dipshits in office keep fucking around, they will have a military coup. My generation is obviously a bunch of pussies, or else we would have lynched these fuckers ourselves. I don't know about this new generation though. The brainwashing that goes on in this country is intense as fuck. This article is yet another example of how one just stands in awe at the balls of all authority figures these days. The system is a good one, but corruption is so rampant in it, it's sickening. We are seeing corruption from the lowest levels of government to the highest.

    Don't think so? Take a look at Britain with this hacker scandal. Britain has always struck me as being a bit more reserved and cultured and for that much corruption going to the highest parts of it is dismaying. We KNOW we have super ambitious, money grubbing, stab your kids in the back with a butter knife for a dime, kind of people here in power. To think it's not 100 times more corrupt here is living in La La Land. We literally ARE the wild west.

    Here is how I see it playing out. Dumbfuck Republicans and Democrats will fuck this up and the government will go fucking broke belling up. This is going to threaten the sovereignty of the United States in way you can't fucking imagine. I hope to fucking shout that we still have some people in high command in the military that Constitutionally say "FUCK YOU", arrest the entire lot of them, and we hold emergency elections to replace them. In the mean time, they lock the entire country the fuck down. Meaning nothing comes in, we tell ships coming this way, fuck off or we sink you. Planes, everything has to be turned back unless the military O.K.s it.

    The economy will go WTF as Wall Street pisses it's self. But it will prompt local manufacturing to start up. Which will be good for the economy of the little people. The multinational cocksuckers will be fucked, Wal-Mart will not get to fuck us with all the cheap shit from China. We can uncap untold amounts of oil wells here and gas will be so fucking cheap even I will not bitch about the prices.

    The bad news, lots of people will die. There will be panic, riots, more riots, cultural clashes if not mini-wars. There will of course be a split in the factions of the military, so probably up to half of it will be fighting with the other half and the UN. Fuck the UN, they will be here trying to beat down OUR military that is doing the coup. So the UN troops will come to know the horror of what we do to foreign troops in our land. If any survive they will tell horror stories for hundreds of years about our savagery, making anything out of darkest Africa, or South America, or even Hollywood, look pale in comparison to. I am talking about shit that would give Hannibal Lecter and Colonel Kurtz a nervous breakdown.

    The whole world will collectively piss it's self. After all, when it comes to nukes we invented the game, which means we have plenty of them around. And we have plenty of crazy fuckers who would use them on OURSELVES in a heart beat. That means when we are over the rainbow, batshit crazy, fighting it out with each other, that if you fuck with us, we will probably nuke you shitless, then get back to the business of fucking each other up.

    People have been seething pissed for decades now. Cops are under some impression that they could survive the public deciding to off the entire lot of them. Frankly they don't h

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @11:10PM (#36819374)

    I run a youth program. We have HD security cameras covering all of our premises (not the bathrooms). We have caught police misconduct more than once with those cameras.

    Back in May we had a police officer from the next town over come in to "talk" with one of our teens about a crime that "they may have witnessed". When I got this call, my next call was to 911 to put on record that this was going to go on (standard policy for us, any time a police officer calls to interview a kid in our program, a staff member calls 911 to put it on the record. We find this stops a lot of police abuses, along with our ready access to lawyers). When the police officers came, the two of them tried to strong arm the kid out the door. We flatly refused to allow the teen to be taken to the police station to be questioned, and told the police officers that they would need to arrest the teen and read them their rights before we would allow them to leave (and that the teen was then invoking the right to a lawyer). They were not happy - they even accused me of not 'playing ball'.

    When they started shoving the teen and talking about how the teen had just hit the officer (to be clear, the teen never touched the cop, the cops flatly made it up), and that was grounds for arrest, I physically stepped between the cops and the teen (I am 6'1, 220, a third degree black belt in Tie Kwan Do and like to lift weights) and informed them that the interview was over, and they were to leave. My volunteer assistant (who works part time as a judge at the state Department of Education!) called 911 at that point - calling 911 also activates the audio recording of all of our cameras, as well as an auto backup of our cameras to the law office next door.

    Long story short, it was a weird stand off until local police arrived - the two cops having their hands on their guns, my telling them they had to leave or be escorted out. When local police arrived (with whom we have a generally good relationship) we informed them that our security cameras had caught the whole thing and we wanted the two cops arrested for assault. The first thing the local cops wanted to do was take the recording device and arrest the teen. When I said that it was no problem, our system recorded to three redundant devices, one of which is at our lawyers office, suddenly they didn't want to take the teen, and couldn't get out of their fast enough.

    We sent a copy of the video to the DA's office, asking for an investigation, another copy went to the lawyer we set the family up with to represent this kid, and a third to the police department of the next town, with a letter from our lawyer stating that we would not allow any officer from their department to enter our premises or interview any of our kids without the programs lawyer present.

    • by TheTyrannyOfForcedRe (1186313) on Wednesday July 20, 2011 @08:58AM (#36822860)

      I run a youth program. We have HD security cameras covering all of our premises (not the bathrooms). We have caught police misconduct more than once with those cameras.

      Back in May we had a police officer from the next town over come in to "talk" with one of our teens about a crime that "they may have witnessed". When I got this call, my next call was to 911 to put on record that this was going to go on (standard policy for us, any time a police officer calls to interview a kid in our program, a staff member calls 911 to put it on the record. We find this stops a lot of police abuses, along with our ready access to lawyers). When the police officers came, the two of them tried to strong arm the kid out the door. We flatly refused to allow the teen to be taken to the police station to be questioned, and told the police officers that they would need to arrest the teen and read them their rights before we would allow them to leave (and that the teen was then invoking the right to a lawyer). They were not happy - they even accused me of not 'playing ball'.

      When they started shoving the teen and talking about how the teen had just hit the officer (to be clear, the teen never touched the cop, the cops flatly made it up), and that was grounds for arrest, I physically stepped between the cops and the teen (I am 6'1, 220, a third degree black belt in Tie Kwan Do and like to lift weights) and informed them that the interview was over, and they were to leave. My volunteer assistant (who works part time as a judge at the state Department of Education!) called 911 at that point - calling 911 also activates the audio recording of all of our cameras, as well as an auto backup of our cameras to the law office next door.

      Long story short, it was a weird stand off until local police arrived - the two cops having their hands on their guns, my telling them they had to leave or be escorted out. When local police arrived (with whom we have a generally good relationship) we informed them that our security cameras had caught the whole thing and we wanted the two cops arrested for assault. The first thing the local cops wanted to do was take the recording device and arrest the teen. When I said that it was no problem, our system recorded to three redundant devices, one of which is at our lawyers office, suddenly they didn't want to take the teen, and couldn't get out of their fast enough.

      We sent a copy of the video to the DA's office, asking for an investigation, another copy went to the lawyer we set the family up with to represent this kid, and a third to the police department of the next town, with a letter from our lawyer stating that we would not allow any officer from their department to enter our premises or interview any of our kids without the programs lawyer present.

      Yea, and just yesterday I was having sex with a dozen of my girlfriends when Santa and The Easter Bunny dropped by to do blow and jerk off unicorns. I have quite a few unicorns. Their barn is right behind the lake where my pet Pleseosaur hangs out.

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