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Media Privacy News

News of the World Investigation Expanded to 9/11 Victims 135

Posted by samzenpus
from the got-to-tap-them-all dept.
DMandPenfold writes "Police are questioning whether a change in News International's email retention policy was part of an effort to conceal widespread phone hacking by the News of the World, a scandal which is threatening Rupert Murdoch's planned takeover of BSkyB. The trawl for emails and the questioning of changes in News International's email retention policy has important implications for IT security and corporate governance professionals, and is likely to see organizations examining their own policies and reminding their staff on acceptable usage and best practice for email."
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News of the World Investigation Expanded to 9/11 Victims

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  • by Trepidity (597) <delirium-slashdo ... org minus author> on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:14AM (#36720724)

    is likely to see organizations examining their own policies and reminding their staff on acceptable usage and best practice for email

    It'd be pretty sad if the lesson people take from the News Corp fiasco is: man, their IT staff should've really been more on the ball about making sure no evidence of the crimes they committed was accidentally retained.

  • by darien.train (1752510) on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:15AM (#36720732) Journal
    And a lot of it too. Everyone can smell it and the revelations are only in their infancy. I always thought Murdoch was a blight on the news industry and a poster child for the evils of media consolidation but this scandal shocks even me. This is mafia-level shit.
  • Ok, ok. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:15AM (#36720740) Journal
    Can we finish locking the News of the World staff in their headquarters and burning it to the ground, along with anybody found to have aided or abetted them(given that their contacts with the Met and right up to the PM are well known, this probably includes a few people in addition to their shady PIs...) and get on to an important matter:

    Why are phones, particularly the VM box that is more or less an automatic part of today's cell phone, so damn vulnerable? The Telcoes seem to have no trouble tracking our activities in great detail if those activities are something for which we can be billed, and they also seem eminently willing to cooperate with law enforcement. Why, then, do I have absolutely no way of knowing when, and from where, my VM box was called into, and why would the VM box of a phone that is subject to police investigation be accessible from the outside at all?

    I certainly wouldn't mind seeing a bunch of tabloid flacks roasted in their own slime; but if voicemail hacking and phone intercepts by random PIs are that easy, we have a problem that needs to be solved by better security, not just crushing malefactors after the fact...
  • Re:Ok, ok. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Herkum01 (592704) on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:25AM (#36720862)

    I know VM is not very secure, but what I don't understand is why everyone is not screaming about this being a hacking crime. If an individual does this they want to throw the book at them and lock them up for years.

    Just because it is a newspaper out to make money does not entitle them to escape criminal charges. They should be out there pressing charges and fining Murdoch for this behavior.

  • by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:27AM (#36720882)

    It'd be pretty sad if the lesson people take from the News Corp fiasco is: man, their IT staff should've really been more on the ball about making sure no evidence of the crimes they committed was accidentally retained.

    It's been an open secret for well over a decade now that email retention policies are purely legal dodges. There is no other reason to automatically delete such massive stores of institutional memory except for the possible legal threat they may pose. It isn't like email storage requirements are a practical limitation - any company with terabytes of email is going to have an IT budget so large that those costs will be lost in the noise.

    And, while I don't have a link at hand, I recall a case a couple years ago where the government was pursuing charges that a large corp's email retention practices were a deliberate form of destruction of evidence - despite all of the lawyerly sign-offs and standardised corporate practices verbiage. I wish I did have a link because I'd like to know how that case turned out.

  • by Rogerborg (306625) on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:29AM (#36720910) Homepage
    Oh, pfft, Murdoch could eat an orphan live on Sky 1, and he'd still be feted and fawned over come the next general election. Keeping that harridan Rebekah Brooks on-board is a clear F-U to the peons (in which I include such non-entities as mere Prime Ministers).
  • by Zelos (1050172) on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:51AM (#36721220)

    What about the morons who kept buying the paper every Sunday to read those kind of idiotic stories?

    Perhaps it's a case of getting the newspapers we deserve?

  • by HangingChad (677530) on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:53AM (#36721244) Homepage
    See, I don't buy that. You may want it to be true because it excuses Fox. False equivalence lets one side keep moving the goal post. The other side does it, therefore it's okay if our guys do it.
  • by Hope Thelps (322083) on Monday July 11, 2011 @01:13PM (#36722724)

    Keeping that harridan Rebekah Brooks on-board is a clear F-U to the peons (in which I include such non-entities as mere Prime Ministers).

    Maybe.

    I'd pretty much assumed that she was just being kept ready as the scape goat of choice when things get really bad (and we don't know how much there is yet to come). "Oh, we don't want to lose Rebekah, we have complete confidence in Rebekah, no absolutely we won't fire Rebekah... well, okay, you win, Rebekah has been escorted out of the building - a big triumph for the will of the public. Massive embarassement for us but you beat us. Now let's move on."

    Maybe I'm just naive.

  • by Nick Ives (317) on Monday July 11, 2011 @06:09PM (#36727224)

    Wait a second, you're seriously arguing that it would have been better for the Kenyan people to not know about the corruption? That the fixing of an election and the ensuing violence was Wikileaks fault?

    Wikileaks didn't kill those people, cabinet ministers in the Kenyan government planned and promoted the violence in order to crush the opposition! Sure, if the opposition hadn't found out about the corruption there would have been no reason to kill them. If you want to follow that logic though, we should just burn all newspapers and do whatever the people in power tell us to do.

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