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How Google+ Measures Up On Privacy 164

Posted by timothy
from the circling-the-wagons dept.
itwbennett writes "The slow rollout of Google+ has led some to wonder whether Google was trying to create demand through scarcity, but it might just be that the company learned its lesson from the privacy fiasco that was the launch of Google Buzz. 'I think it is very smart of Google to restrict Plus to a "limited field trial" — they aren't even calling it a beta. Google made a misstep with the roll out of Buzz. They've already avoided that mistake with Plus with this limited release. And because it's so exclusive, tech savvy individuals are fighting to get in — just the type of folks that you want as beta testers,' said Sean Sullivan, an F-Secure security adviser. Of course, fixing bugs doesn't necessarily mean that Google will have privacy issues buttoned up. 'Google Plus is clearly designed to give people better control over their privacy with respect to their family, co-workers and friends, [but] there are other types of privacy that it simply can't provide,' says Peter Eckersley, a senior staff technologist for the Electronic Frontier Foundation. 'Nobody has succeeded in building a social network that can offer those kinds of privacy protections yet.'"
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How Google+ Measures Up On Privacy

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  • by countertrolling (1585477) * on Monday July 11, 2011 @08:16AM (#36718870) Journal

    'Nobody has succeeded in building a social network that can offer those kinds of privacy protections yet. And nobody ever will.' - Networked computer will do everything but protect privacy. It can't be done any more than you can protect a radio broadcast. Even the best encryption depends on trust.

  • by PARENA (413947) on Monday July 11, 2011 @08:17AM (#36718876) Homepage
    If you want to have big big big privacy, then there's no use in joining any kind of social network. The whole idea is to share information with others. Now, you can lock down showing private information (or don't even need to fill in that information), so what's the problem? If you want most control of your privacy, I don't see why you would want to join a social network. As far as I can see it's "fine" as it is: you can share the information with the people you want. The only bad thing is when EULA's or whatever say you give the owner of network a license to do with your stuff as they see fit (usually for advertising). But if they didn't do that, it'd be a quick end. That's the idea: you give them your stuff, they give you their stuff.
  • by moonbender (547943) <moonbender@gmai l . com> on Monday July 11, 2011 @08:20AM (#36718896)

    Giving people tools that make it easier to keep private things from being seen by prospective employers, parents, the world at large is a good thing. However, the centralized nature still means that Google gets to see everything -- as well as anybody else Google lets in on it.

  • by rust627 (1072296) on Monday July 11, 2011 @08:55AM (#36719112)

    Google+ is much tighter with your data than Facebook is by about a brazillian percent

    a brazillian percent, is that a normal percent with all the private hair shaved off ?

  • Re:Privacy, BS (Score:5, Insightful)

    by repetty (260322) on Monday July 11, 2011 @09:25AM (#36719438) Homepage

    I know that you want me to be appalled but, instead, I find that damn funny!

  • by Archangel Michael (180766) on Monday July 11, 2011 @11:22AM (#36720816) Journal

    Nope. If it is on the internet, it can be shared, and attributed back to you. Screenshots do this marvelously, and there is nothing you can do to stop someone from screen scraping.

  • by BitterOak (537666) on Monday July 11, 2011 @03:03PM (#36724786)

    'Nobody has succeeded in building a social network that can offer those kinds of privacy protections yet. And nobody ever will.' - Networked computer will do everything but protect privacy. It can't be done any more than you can protect a radio broadcast. Even the best encryption depends on trust.

    Your italicized statement is correct, but not quite for the reason you describe. It is possible to build secure computer networks: banks do it all the time. The problem is that social networking sites are all about sharing personal information. They would hardly be successful otherwise! Asking for a social network site that didn't compromise anyone's privacy is like asking for a non-flammable fire starter.

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