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Amazon Removes Yaoi Manga Titles From Kindle Store 450

Posted by timothy
from the think-of-the-kindling dept.
Repossessed writes "Amazon is now cracking down on Yaoi manga, with several titles that have been available on the Kindle since 2009 being delisted and others now being rejected, according to Digital Manga Publisher. DMP has also stated that Amazon has not given any rationale for the rejections and removals, and Amazon has not been answering emails or phone calls from journalists asking about the subject."
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Amazon Removes Yaoi Manga Titles From Kindle Store

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  • Wow (Score:2, Funny)

    by Aerorae (1941752)
    Homophobic AND racist. I am so disappointed in you Amazon!
  • by Black Parrot (19622) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @01:52AM (#36131426)

    Can't say I'll miss porn written for schoolgirls, but in general Amazon has been adopting such a manipulative corporate mindset that I have to hold my nose to use them anymore. Where do people go when they give up Amazon?

    • by betterunixthanunix (980855) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @02:06AM (#36131498)

      Where do people go when they give up Amazon?

      Back to paper books? I can think of half a dozen independent book stores within walking distance of my home, and I am in a medium sized town.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 15, 2011 @03:31AM (#36131808)

        Then your medium-sized town is an exception.

      • by Ephemeriis (315124) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @11:17AM (#36133232)

        Where do people go when they give up Amazon?

        Back to paper books? I can think of half a dozen independent book stores within walking distance of my home, and I am in a medium sized town.

        You've either got a different definition of "medium sized town" than I do... Or you've very lucky.

        I also live in what I'd call a "medium sized town"... Biggish for a town, but absolutely nothing you could call a city. We have a Borders, and a used bookstore downtown.

        Borders is becoming less and less of a book store every day. They've got more movies and music and calendars and coffee in there than books already. And the books they do have are a lousy selection. I don't remember the last time I went in there looking for a book that wasn't on a current best seller list and actually found it.

        Yes, if the stars align just right, you can find some awesome stuff at the used bookstore... But more often than not they've just got used copies of the same stuff that Borders is carrying. Cheaper, sure, but I don't want to read it anyway.

        There's a library of course... And they're terrific for some of the older/classic stuff... And reference materials... But they don't generally have newer stuff available. Either they don't have a copy, or the one copy is perpetually loaned out to someone.

        All of which means that I do most of my book shopping on-line.

        I bought a nook largely because I am impatient. I can buy a book on-line and have it download to my nook within a minute or two. And I can even make purchases through the nook itself, so I don't need to be sitting in front of a computer. Makes it much easier to get my hands on decent reading material. Almost makes it seem like I'm not living in the ass-end of nowhere.

        Now, I went with a nook at least in part because of the crap that Amazon has been doing with their Kindle. So I am unaffected by Amazon's decisions right now. But there are a lot of folks out there with Kindles who are affected by these decisions. Who were using Amazon and the Kindle to gain access to reading material that just isn't available in their local area. Especially if we're talking about erotica and/or pornography. It's virtually impossible to find a good selection of erotica/pornography outside of a large city.

        Alright... So you're going to go back to paper books purchased from any one of a half-dozen independant book stores within walking distance of your home in a medium sized town...

        So, where do the rest of us go?

      • by Xyrus (755017)

        Libraries. Libraries and librarians have been fighting the good fight against censorship and banning books for a long time. And it's free.

    • iTunes. And Walmart.

    • by SuricouRaven (1897204) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @03:47AM (#36131850)
      "Can't say I'll miss porn written for schoolgirls,"

      Maybe they'll ban Twilight next.
    • by Andy Smith (55346)

      "Where do people go when they give up Amazon?"

      A bookshop?

    • by tverbeek (457094) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @09:10AM (#36132658) Homepage

      "Can't say I'll miss porn written for schoolgirls..."

      But that's just where it starts.* I don't want to misapply Martin Niemöller's "first they came for the Jews...." quote here, because he was talking about something even worse than censorship, but the principle is the same. If you wait until they get around to affecting you directly, that's way too late. Regardless of what one thinks of these graphic novels (which are the male/male equivalent of disposable paperback romance novels), it should be alarming that the world's largest book seller is removing them from the world's largest e-bookstore. If you have any "guilty pleasures" at all in your entertainment choices (gross-out movies, violent action films, slasher videos, "edgy" comedians, any variety of porn), keep in mind that there are people who want to suppress those too. So it should be important to you – personally – to stop them long before they get there.

      *Actually it started (as far as I've heard) with erotic novels that contained the word "rape" in the title. Amazon's been quietly disappearing books from the Kindle store for a while now.

      "Where do people go when they give up Amazon?"

      Barnes and Noble would be the closest equivalent, both in terms of online dead-tree retailing and a good ebook/reader system. I haven't heard of them pulling books from that system based on someone disapproving of the content. At least not yet.

    • by Ephemeriis (315124) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @11:36AM (#36133336)

      Can't say I'll miss porn written for schoolgirls

      Yaoi is actually a very broad term used to categorize just about any kind of homoerotic media (anime, manga, games, whatever) written by women, for women. So the whole "porn for schoolgirls" thing is a bit off-target.

      And, unless you are a schoolgirl, I wouldn't expect you to miss it much.

      But if you are a schoolgirl you just lost a safe way to explore your sexuality. Now you're being told, like so many other people, that you kink is not OK. That the things that interest you are not fit for mainstream consumption. That they need to be hidden away behind counters and curtains and closed doors. That you should be ashamed of your interests.

  • by artor3 (1344997) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @01:53AM (#36131438)

    Do you really think everyone knows what Yaoi manga is?

    • by Rakshasa Taisab (244699) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @01:55AM (#36131442) Homepage
      And remove the joy of discovery when you google the term? Why for...
    • by pieisgood (841871) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @01:57AM (#36131470) Journal

      That's why there is a link to the wikipedia article in the summary. So you can find out.

      • That's why there is a link to the wikipedia article in the summary. So you can find out.

        So now we're expected to RTFWL too, huh?

      • by artor3 (1344997)

        Links in the summary often point to TFA. Nobody reads those.

        And I did click it and find out, but it would be nice to have a one line description in the summary. That is what summaries are for, after all. Plus, the Wikipedia article describes it as "Boy Love" and only later mentions that its not pedophilic. I suspect that will cause problems that a quick definition could have avoided.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Dude, you're reading a website. Complaining about not knowing something, where the term is linked plainly and clearly to free website that plainly defines the term.

      And instead you logged in, took the effort and time to write a short complaint, and posted it, instead of clicking on that link? Holy. Hell.

    • by Kenja (541830) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @02:34AM (#36131628)
      Has to be linked at some point I guess.

      http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2005/4/11/ [penny-arcade.com]
    • by Homburg (213427)

      Yeah, I'm pretty sure everyone who reads Slashdot knows what yaoi is. "News for Nerds" pretty much implies "News for people who know a little bit too much about Japanese kink."

    • by tverbeek (457094) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @09:28AM (#36132724) Homepage

      OK, yes, the submitter should have explained the term. (Too bad you don't have an internet connection that you could use to look it up.)

      "Manga" is the Japanese word for "comics". In English usage, it means "comics from japan", which are usually sold as 200-ish-page graphic novels.

      "Yaoi" is a vaguely defined term coined from a Japanese phrase, referring to manga written about romanticized male/male relationships. They are written and drawn mostly by women, and read mostly by women, though some gay men enjoy them too. Some yaoi manga are sexually explicit, but usually softcore in nature rather than hardcore. (Japanese culture shies away from drawing cocks.) Quite a few of them are tame enough to be sold to minors in the US: kissing, hand-holding, intense hugging, etc. The characters in them are often young (as is typical in coming-of-age stories), and in some cases are below the age of consent in many parts of the US. But since A) they aren't real people, and B) the drawings aren't usually pornographic per se, it would terribly inaccurate to call it "child porn".

  • by rolfwind (528248) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @01:55AM (#36131444)

    This was always the paradox of ebooks. By every measure, ebooks should have the first thing that easily came to the computer. Files sizes were small and text was one of the first things reasonably conquered by computers. In the early days, sound cards were necessary to play music, video files were just goddamned intensive.... and yet as a medium, books came last after everything else.

    Now, we're stuck with Amazon/Apple being the central distributors, they're start going to decide more and more on content for whatever reason. At least music players, you can load it up as an mp3 file and there are several music stores online to choose from. Even Apple managed to talk RIAA out of DRM. But publishers are going to be signing their own death warrant, building up their masters for the immediate (and false) security of DRM.

    I love things in a digital format. But I really, really hate how the distribution model is playing out. This is the eBay model. One central place, it's convenient in some ways, but you play by their rules or you don't play at all, and if they decide to fuck you, they really fuck you.

    We need to get away from the eBay model from these greedy ass companies, or it's going to be a damned bleak and bland future. We need to move over to the google shopping model, decentralized and seperate stores/vendor offering their wares connected by an neutraol aggregator (which lets people review service) and a whitelist for the cautious type.

    I'm getting really sick of the direction these gadgets are heading.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by zmughal (1343549)

      yet as a medium, books came last after everything else.

      No, they didn't. Text files were always readily available on different networks. It's just that the general public would rather get a dead tree copy than use up paper on printing them out or read them sitting in front the computer screen. What we see now is a less tech-savvy public that would rather pull all their media from central distributors anyway, because they are ignorant of the alternatives. This is why DRM is being thrust upon us without a mass uproar.

    • by MimeticLie (1866406) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @02:09AM (#36131516)
      It's really only an issue for the Kindle folks right now. Other readers (Nook, Kobo, ect) can use EPUB files, available from many different sources. If Amazon starts driving smaller stores out of business or the other stores start censoring as well, then it might be cause for concern. As it is, you can still find Yaoi from Barnes and Noble:

      http://search.barnesandnoble.com/King-of-Debt/Sanae-Rokuya/e/2940012508836/?itm=1&USRI=king+of+debt [barnesandnoble.com]
      • by Ephemeriis (315124) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @11:50AM (#36133420)

        It's really only an issue for the Kindle folks right now. Other readers (Nook, Kobo, ect) can use EPUB files, available from many different sources. If Amazon starts driving smaller stores out of business or the other stores start censoring as well, then it might be cause for concern. As it is, you can still find Yaoi from Barnes and Noble:

        http://search.barnesandnoble.com/King-of-Debt/Sanae-Rokuya/e/2940012508836/?itm=1&USRI=king+of+debt [barnesandnoble.com]

        This is why I purchased a nook, instead of a Kindle.

        Well, not this specifically... I'm not a big fan of yaoi...

        But, thus far, B&N has not been pulling the same kind of crap that Amazon has. They haven't been pulling questionable titles and deleting books off of ereaders. And even if they did, I can buy my books somewhere else as an EPUB or a PDF.

        Part of that I attribute to the fact that B&N is an actual bookstore, while Amazon is just a generic online retailer. You won't be buying a new computer from B&N. And, while they do stock music and movies... The selection of books absolutely dwarfs the selection of music and movies. Real bookstores are generally opposed to censorship. They're generally opposed to banning and burning books.

        Amazon, on the other hand, is the on-line equivalent of Wal-Mart.

    • I'm going to be branded a socialist, but I think we need a system where DRM is NOT dependent on proprietary software and servers. The various industries/actors don't seem to be putting that in place, so I guess it would fall to the government to force it. Pretty much like they're standardizing car fuel so any station can supply any car, pizza toppings....

      It would be good to have a single system (so content could move from one device to another), independent from original vendor (so one company's failure / c

      • Can't be done. DRM is propritary by it's very nature. It can't possibly be open, otherwise people could simply modify it to ignore the DRM flags and export unencrypted. Open DRM is a contradiction in terms. Making it not dependant on the continued presence of a server to function is doable though.
    • by Trogre (513942)

      I realise your point is most likely about books under copyright restrictions, but thought I should point out that Project Gutenberg [gutenberg.org] has been in operation since 1971.

    • by molnarcs (675885)
      Well, informing the public is a start. Buy Kindle, buy books for Amazon, and be forever dependent on Amazon's gadgets to access the books you purchased for almost the same price as the dead tree versions! I'm a big fan of eBook readers - I hate reading on a backlit LCD. When I was shopping for an eBook reader, I carefully considered all options, and ended up with... WAIT FOR IT... SONY - yeah, that's right. No DRM on their online bookstore, and it reads everything you throw at it - PDF, .epub, text, even MS
    • by jbolden (176878)

      You can buy kindle format books from multiple publishers. For example http://www.adultebookshop.com/ [adultebookshop.com] carries stuff that Amazon won't and Kindle is their preferred format.

    • by RonTheHurler (933160) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @08:03AM (#36132438)

      This is clearly a form of censorship, but it's not an illegal one. Amazon has a right to choose what they carry in their stores, just as any other store does.

      There is a worse form of censorship happening in our schools that very few people seem to be aware of. I discovered this when my daughters collaborated to write a book [mysistermakesmelaugh.com]. They are in first and third grade, and when the box of newly printed books arrived, they proudly tried to donate several copies to the school library. The school rejected them.

      It was not because of content. The librarian and some teachers all read the book and thought it was fine, and a great example of accomplishment for the other kids. It was not because of price -- we were donating the books. The problem is, the school district only allows books from a specific set of publishers, and since this book was self-published, it could not be allowed in the school. I inquired about the publishers, and there were only three on the list (Scholastic being one, and I'm sorry don't recall the other two.)

      Essentially, the schools don't have to censor anymore, they have outsourced that function to a few trusted publishers. In our case, this is a district-wide policy, other districts might be different.

      I have a busy life and didn't have the time to become an activist for open libraries in the schools (but I truly wish I could). Instead, I managed to get the kids' book on Amazon and B&N (although not in an e-book format -- It's a picture book that doesn't migrate well to those devices.)

      Regarding Kindles, distributors and censorship - the device is not totally dependent on the e-store. I have versions of my daughters' book on my own kindle and in Ibooks too. The formats for publishing on those devices is pretty well known (epub. mobi, pdf, etc.) Distribution is the problem, but only for the technically challenged who can't be bothered to manually transfer the title onto their device - even when it's as simple as sending an email (a service Amazon provides for their Kindles -- it's a slightly bigger challenge for iBooks, but only slightly. I don't have a Nook...)

      But I can't hack into my kids' library so easily -- other than to provide books at home for them too. Is there a better solution to this problem? Ultimately, I don't think so. Does anyone have a different opinion?

      • Barnes and Noble has a publishing program and a Color Reader that would be perfect for your kids book.
      • by radish (98371)

        That's certainly not the case nationwide. My wife is an elementary school librarian and I just asked her about this - she said that getting self published books in can sometimes be controversial as they have a mandate that all books must support the curriculum, and many self published books are of little academic value. That said, she said they can and do purchase them, and they have a number of self published books like yours from fellow students in the collection (which, incidentally, are very popular wit

    • Amazon is merely controlling what it sells in its online ebook store. You can still obtain you books from other sources and read it on your Kindle. Sure, it might not be as convenient; you have to convert from a different format, like .epub or .lit, but there are free tools, like Calibre, available for the purpose.

    • This was always the paradox of ebooks. By every measure, ebooks should have the first thing that easily came to the computer. Files sizes were small and text was one of the first things reasonably conquered by computers. In the early days, sound cards were necessary to play music, video files were just goddamned intensive.... and yet as a medium, books came last after everything else.

      Personally, I lay that at the feet of device design.

      A paper book, requires no batteries, works in a wide range of light
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 15, 2011 @01:55AM (#36131448)

    Meanwhile still availible:

    "Titles currently available on Kindle include Christmas Creampie, a graphic novel in which “horny Whoreville hussies show a frustrated dildo shop owner the true meaning of Christmas,” and Little Lorna in Resort Sports (I’m not even going to link to this one), in which Little Lorna, who is spunky, sexy, but “not too bright,” goes on vacation to Mexico with her Uncle Bob; “nudity, spanking, and sexy humor” result.
    So apparently a sweet love story between two men is unacceptable, but an orgy in a dildo shop is OK."

    http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2011/05/too-hot-for-kindle-amazon-pulls-yaoi-from-kindle-store/ [comicbookresources.com]

  • by oheso (898435) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @01:56AM (#36131450)
    They have consistently shown they're in the money biz, and don't give a fig about art or freedom of speech.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      If they were just in the "money" business, this content would just be another set of SKUs in their inventory. The problem, if what is being alleged is true, is that they are in the "ideology" business.

    • I never realised the purpose of a bookstore was to depend freedom of speech. I thought it was to sell books.

      Not that defending freedom of speech isn't a good thing, but it's not really an essential part of the definition of a bookstore.

      • by Teun (17872)
        But through the centuries books and other printed material have more often than not been the centre-piece of the fight for freedom of speech, a well documented example was the Gulag Archipelago, a book by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

        What you seem to forget is that most languages and cultures rather talk about freedom of information.

  • It doesn't matter what you think of yaoi, or manga, or erotica in general. Surely you can see where this is going. Stop supporting the thought police and put your money into companies that don't censor books. Amazon won't stop until they lose enough money. There's no telling when they'll start ruining classics.
    • by artor3 (1344997)

      There's no telling when they'll start ruining classics.

      Have you ever bought a classic on Amazon? They're mostly crappy OCR jobs, rife with errors.

      (To be fair, that's not Amazon's fault, and they're only a dollar at any rate)

    • by tnk1 (899206)

      Please. An attack on yaoi isn't going to turn into an attack on Shakespeare. If you think that, you're delusional.

      Look, if you like that sort of thing, that's fine I guess, but it's not like it's one of the bedrocks of literary tradition. To suggest that soft-core porn comics of idealized boys going at it for the entertainment of girls is some sort of test raid on something like classical literature is just silly.

      It's a niche market that brings with it some concern that it will alienate the larger part o

  • by eltardo (160932) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @02:04AM (#36131490)

    As long as I can still buy 12" double sided dildos on Amazon, I'm good.

  • by Jeremy Erwin (2054) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @02:07AM (#36131506) Journal

    Amazon's content requirements [amazon.com] are very clear. Even if the material is not pornographic, it can still offend-- and Amazon is not obligated to explain why it has chosen to take offense.

    • A company with the dominance and influence of Amazon must be held to higher standards, for the common good.
      • Those "common" folk whose "good" you are protecting are complicit in the censorship; the overwhelming majority of people in the United States support obscenity laws and whatnot. Most people do not really care about Yaoi manga being removed form Amazon, and quite a few people in America will applaud Amazon for being a "family friendly company" that protects their children from any depiction of sexuality (certainly HOMOSEXUALITY).
      • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

        by LordLucless (582312)

        Ahh, yes, the "some are more equal than others" argument. Luckily, Amazon still sells Animal Farm.

        On another note, I was thinking of organising a rally against Krogers for not stocking Kraft Stringers. I assume you'll be joining me to protest this criminal infringement of my right to determine what vendors must be forced to stock.

      • by Issarlk (1429361)
        I think the highest standard we can find is in Iran. Let's put Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in control of Amazon's "content quality" section to remove bad items from their catalog.
    • If this goes on, Amazon will do to books what Walmart has done to movies.

  • by Art Popp (29075) * on Sunday May 15, 2011 @02:12AM (#36131536)

    I'd be curious as to whether someone has a better model in mind on how this should be done.

    Given:

    The Amazon Kindle Terms and Conditions: “We are entitled to determine what content we accept and distribute through the Program in our sole discretion.”

    The anime.net definition of Yaoi:
              An acronym standing for YAma nashi, Ochi nashi, Imi nashi – No Climax, no point, no meaning. It’s used
              to describe manga/anime focusing on male relationships, not avoiding strong, graphically portrayed homosexual
              themes. Very often, yaoi story focuses only on the sex, ignoring elements like true plot, emotions or characters development.

    There really is zero doubt as to why Amazon didn't want this on the Kindle. I don't know why there are any “phone calls from journalists asking about the subject.” If you live in the US, clearly the Kindle's primary market, then you know that there are a large number of people here who would spontaneously combust if the they found their tweenager reading this stuff as a “Lend Me” book on their Kindle.

    Given that this content is available online (and in color) it would seem a difficult niche to make money on, which would be required to re-engineer your whole e-book system to have age-sections/age-bars. Simply rating 900,000 ebooks so you could decide their category would be a serious expense.

    So my questions are:

            Would such ratings be more valuable than they would be a tool for greater censorship?

            What scale would you use?

            Is this is project we should Open/Crowd-Source?

            Where would you rate: The Canterbury Tales, Sons and Lovers, 1984?

            The above are available on the Kindle store now. Would an rating system that we implemented make them available to more or fewer total humans?

    • I'd be curious as to whether someone has a better model in mind on how this should be done.

      Given:

      The Amazon Kindle Terms and Conditions: “We are entitled to determine what content we accept and distribute through the Program in our sole discretion.”

      That's an easy one: don't buy a media device controlled by a single content provider.

    • I'd be curious as to whether someone has a better model in mind on how this should be done.

      The Kindle should be able to display and process books from retailers other than Amazon, so that Amazon does not have so much control over what books people are able to obtain. It is absurd to think that people should need multiple book readers just to have options to buy books from other sources.

      If you live in the US, clearly the Kindle's primary market, then you know that there are a large number of people here who would spontaneously combust if the they found their tweenager reading this stuff as a âoeLend Meâ book on their Kindle.

      Then those parents should speak to their children about why such things are not allowed in the house. If their children are willing to break the rules even with their parents explaining why the rules exist, t

      • by bluemonq (812827)

        The Kindle should be able to display and process books from retailers other than Amazon, so that Amazon does not have so much control over what books people are able to obtain

        I hate to be *that* guy, but there's already an ereader that allows you to display and process books from retailers other than Amazon. It's called the iPad. You can read Kobo/Borders and Barnes & Noble books on it, as well as from other stores as well. Don't like the iPad? There's the Motorola Xoom. And the LG G Slate. And Samsung's Galaxy Tab and Tab 10.1. And the Dell Streak 5, though that's getting a bit on the small side. You could even hack the Barnes & Noble nook to run other ebookstore apps,

  • by Ron Bennett (14590) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @02:13AM (#36131546) Homepage

    After Amazon remotely deleted 1984 (ironic to say the least), this is no surprise. It would be akin to a book seller breaking into one's home to take back a book one had already bought; "licensed" is the loophole Amazon and other on-line book sellers uses to get around the 1st sale doctrine to restrict, or even often forbid, resale, sharing, etc.

    More to the point, the 1984 incident illustrated well that Kindles, much like many mobile devices, are designed with remote deletion in mind - there was an article on here the other day about Google remotely deleting apps.

    While Amazon supposedly agreed they will refrain from utilizing remote deletion in the future, the feature still exists. On a related note, even if the device out of the box doesn't support remote deletion, any device that accepts software updates with little (ie. Bluray players; inserting a disc) to no user intervention (mobile phones) can easily be programmed to remotely restrict / delete / self-destruct.

    Among the best defenses against remote deletion / restrictions are widely used, non-DRM formats that can be easily copied and widely distributed, as well as, easily compared / verified to ensure the contents haven't changed...

    To digress a tad, it's only a matter of time, assuming it's not already happened, before some company, such as Amazon, doesn't remotely delete a book, but rather silently modifies some of the content *after* purchase without telling the customer.

    Ron

    • by DaScribbler (701492) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @02:34AM (#36131626)

      You left out the point that when Amazon removed 1984 (and Animal Farm too) from Kindle devices, it was because it was discovered that the books were added to the Kindle store by a publisher that didn't have the rights to sell the books. And that the books were subsequently re-added to the Kindle store by the publisher that DID have the rights to them. The customers were refunded and credited for their troubles.

      The analogy that it's akin to breaking into one's home is a bit of a stretch.

      • The copyright issue was besides the point... which was the ease with which Amazon nuked the digital volumes. As a consumer of printed works, I want the sale to remain final, regardless of whether the distributor later has a change of heart given their perception of business, legal, moral, or national security issues.

      • by Ephemeriis (315124) on Sunday May 15, 2011 @12:02PM (#36133494)

        You left out the point that when Amazon removed 1984 (and Animal Farm too) from Kindle devices, it was because it was discovered that the books were added to the Kindle store by a publisher that didn't have the rights to sell the books. And that the books were subsequently re-added to the Kindle store by the publisher that DID have the rights to them. The customers were refunded and credited for their troubles.

        The analogy that it's akin to breaking into one's home is a bit of a stretch.

        Granted, the publisher did not have the rights to those books. That is true.

        But it wasn't really those books being pulled from the store that surprised me. What surprised me was those books being deleted from Kindles.

        If I go buy a paper copy of 1984 and it turns out that the publisher doesn't have the right to it, that book will be pulled from store shelves, but I'll still have my book sitting at home.

        Amazon did the digital equivalent of sending someone to your house to forcibly collect the offending book. Sure, you were refunded... But that doesn't make me feel much better.

  • For years I've hoped for someone to remake Fahrenheit 451 with a script that was reasonably close to the book. I was more than a little disappointed when Gibson dropped the project on the theory that (per Wikipedia) "with the advent of computers, the concept of book-burning in a futuristic period may no longer work."

    Ah, but that was before the Kindle, and the 451 test run in the form of the 1984 and Animal Farm erasures. From my POV, in the 451 universe, when books were outlawed by (presumably) an Act of Co

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