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Cutting Prices Is the Only Way To Stop Piracy 620

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the way-to-obvious dept.
Stoobalou writes "The only way to stop piracy is to cut prices. That's the verdict of a major new academic study that reckons copyright theft won't be halted by 'three strikes' broadband disconnections, increasing censorship or draconian new laws brought in under the anti-counterfeiting treaty ACTA. The Media Piracy Project, published last week by the Social Science Research Council, reports that illegal copying of movies, music, video games and software is 'better described as a global pricing problem' — and the only way to tackle it is for copyright holders to charge consumers less money for their wares."
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Cutting Prices Is the Only Way To Stop Piracy

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  • by gstoddart (321705) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @03:53PM (#35495502) Homepage

    I find it highly unlikely the ones screeching loudest about losing money to copyright violations are going to start charging less money for their stuff.

    CDs were supposed to be lower the cost of music. Digital files were supposed to lower the cost of music.

    These guys will push to get a law passed to ensure that everybody tithes to them long before they'd ever consider lowering their prices.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @03:53PM (#35495504)

    Netflix streaming is a good example of good pricing vs content offered. TV shows and movies sold on the iTunes Store is a good example of bad pricing. TV Shows in HD should cost 99 cents to own, 50 cents to stream and SD shows should cost 50 cents to own and 25 cents to stream. Movies should be priced at least half if not a quarter of the price for the DVD or BluRay version.

  • How cheap? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by FumarMata (1340847)
    I am selling an iPhone game at 0.99 $ and there's still people pirating it. Does it have to be even cheaper?
    • Re:How cheap? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by LanMan04 (790429) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:05PM (#35495682)

      I am selling an iPhone game at 0.99 $ and there's still people pirating it. Does it have to be even cheaper?

      Try selling at it $5.99 and see what happens to the app's piracy rate...

      • by vux984 (928602)

        Try selling at it $5.99 and see what happens to the app's piracy rate...

        I expect the absolute piracy to stay the same.
        I expect total legitimate sales to fall through the floor.
        Thus piracy rate will skyrocket *

        Note that "Piracy Rate" (defined here as the ratio of piracy to legit sales will increase dramatically as an artifact of the legitimate sales crashing, not as a result of any increase in actual piracy.

        I seriously doubt there is anyone paying for $1 apps that would jailbreak their phone to pirate a $5 o

    • Re:How cheap? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by h4rr4r (612664) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:09PM (#35495736)

      Don't worry about the people pirating it, just make it the price at which you make the most money even when some do pirate it. If making it $0.50 would convert enough pirates to buyers than do that, if not don't.

    • by Rary (566291)

      I am selling an iPhone game at 0.99 $ and there's still people pirating it. Does it have to be even cheaper?

      There are people who will never pirate anything. These people will either buy the product, or simply not buy it. Price it to convince these people to choose to buy over not buy.

      There are people who will buy if it's cheap enough, or pirate if it's not. Price it to convince these people to choose to buy over pirate.

      There are people who will pirate at any price. Forget them. You can't get their money, no matter what you do, and they're not costing you a penny. You need to get over it and worry only about the f

  • by elrous0 (869638) * on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @03:53PM (#35495518)

    The problem that I have is that many of us don't WANT to be a pirates, but the studios heavy-handedness and greed make it almost impossible NOT to. I am perfectly happy buying a blu-ray or DVD. But the studios often throw up so many road-blocks to me as a legitimate consumer as to make it impossible.

    I DVR "The Color of Money" (one of Scorsese's best, IMHO) in HD and I want to buy a copy that won't disappear the second my DVR dies. But, guess what? The studio says I can't (the only legally available version is a crappy non-anamorphic DVD that looks awful on a modern TV). So I'm left with the option of Pirate Bay or illegally ripping it off my DVR (both of which would make me a pirate in their eyes). I want to buy it legitimately, but the studio says no.

    I DVR "Space Race: The Untold Story" [imdb.com] (great docudrama, BTW) in HD from the National Geographic Channel. Same deal, want to buy it. But this time the studio won't even let me buy a DVD in the U.S. (much less an HD blu-ray). It's only available in Region 2. So, even if I import it, I would now be forced to illegally modify my DVD player to watch it. Want to buy it. Want to be honest. Nope, I would have to rip it from my DVR if I wanted to own it.

    Even with the blu-rays and DVD's I *can* buy, I'm stuck watching 5 or 6 forced trailers at the beginning of each (many studios not even letting me skip them). Don't want to spend several minutes fighting with your player just to watch the goddamn movie you paid for? Better go off to Pirate Bay, because that's the only way you're getting it, buddy.

    To Sony, Warner, Paramount, et. al.: Stop forcing people to be pirates with your fucking DRM, your greed, your region coding, your goddamn bizarre distribution rights agreements, etc. and you'll find there are a LOT more people willing to actually pay for your stuff than you think.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      Dude, if you don't own a region free player (which are certainly not illegal to produce/sell/import/buy and all the big manufacturers make them), you're a n00b. Further it's not illegal to change your DVD player's region code.
      • by FatSean (18753)

        The online shops selling region-free DVD players seem pretty shady to me. I'm looking for a good quality region free Blu-Ray player. Preferably with an eject button on the remote, but all the shops just skeeve me out.

    • by hjf (703092) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:10PM (#35495756) Homepage

      Agreed with that. I've seen ads in DVDs for rent. I thought... well, ok, it's a rental, I'm only gonna watch it once so i don't care.

      Then my dad bought a DVD of a Rolling Stones concert. Guess what? The moment you start it, a 1-minute ad starts playing. You can't skip it. What the hell? If I PAY for something, I don't want to be forced to watch an ad! If it's a (paper) magazine I can skip the pages, but this is way too much.

    • by h4rm0ny (722443)

      Whilst your case may be true, the problem is that arguments about DRM, format availability, ease of downloading vs. having to go to a shop and buy... All these such arguments were made extensively as rationalisations of piracy early on. And yet most of these are dealt with now. I can buy a computer game as a direct download. I can buy high-quality MP3s at the click of a button. Things like wanting The Colour of Money in HD are edge cases these days, and getting fewer all the time. They're not good argument
    • by Roogna (9643) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:40PM (#35496182)

      I have a better solution to this exact problem. My wife and I just stopped buying dvd's and such. If the studios and artists involved don't -want- me to see their work, then I don't go out of my way to see it. If they wanted us to see it they would make it available to see in a useful fashion.

      We're avid movie goers... or at least used to be. But we went from buying a number of dvd's/blu-ray's every month, as well as going to movies to not doing either.
      We're not pirating the content, we simply decided it was becoming too much hassle and -replaced- that entertainment with other things.

      Now we're not straight up boycotting hollywood as a family, but unless something is available how we want it, where we want it, when -we- want it, for an affordable price, we just pass it up. There's nothing hollywood or the record companies produce that I truly feel like I'm missing out by not having access to it. It's entertainment, that's all. Now on the flip side, the studios -SHOULD- want to make it available to us, the consumer, however we decide we want to have access, because while it's just simply entertainment to us, it is THEIR jobs and the food on THEIR plates as an industry that fails if they decide to stop providing content in a fashion that allows them to even have customers.

      So next time you think about pirating something, remember, no one is forcing you to pirate anything. On the contrary, no one is forcing you to give a shit about the studios content at all.

    • by Nyder (754090)

      The problem that I have is that many of us don't WANT to be a pirates, but the studios heavy-handedness and greed make it almost impossible NOT to. I am perfectly happy buying a blu-ray or DVD. But the studios often throw up so many road-blocks to me as a legitimate consumer as to make it impossible.

      I DVR "The Color of Money" (one of Scorsese's best, IMHO) in HD and I want to buy a copy that won't disappear the second my DVR dies. But, guess what? The studio says I can't (the only legally available version is a crappy non-anamorphic DVD that looks awful on a modern TV). So I'm left with the option of Pirate Bay or illegally ripping it off my DVR (both of which would make me a pirate in their eyes). I want to buy it legitimately, but the studio says no.

      I DVR "Space Race: The Untold Story" [imdb.com] (great docudrama, BTW) in HD from the National Geographic Channel. Same deal, want to buy it. But this time the studio won't even let me buy a DVD in the U.S. (much less an HD blu-ray). It's only available in Region 2. So, even if I import it, I would now be forced to illegally modify my DVD player to watch it. Want to buy it. Want to be honest. Nope, I would have to rip it from my DVR if I wanted to own it.

      Even with the blu-rays and DVD's I *can* buy, I'm stuck watching 5 or 6 forced trailers at the beginning of each (many studios not even letting me skip them). Don't want to spend several minutes fighting with your player just to watch the goddamn movie you paid for? Better go off to Pirate Bay, because that's the only way you're getting it, buddy.

      To Sony, Warner, Paramount, et. al.: Stop forcing people to be pirates with your fucking DRM, your greed, your region coding, your goddamn bizarre distribution rights agreements, etc. and you'll find there are a LOT more people willing to actually pay for your stuff than you think.

      While I understand what your saying, the problem i find is, why feel bad?

      The companies that make the shows you like, don't care about you. They do NOT care what you want, all they want is money.

      If they are NOT smart enough to make it available in formats you want, then screw them. Don't feel bad. It's their loss.

      You can, of course, write them and let them know that because they don't offer the quality of the show that you want, your forced to get it other ways. Which is money they just lost in sales,

  • Repost (Score:5, Informative)

    by aBaldrich (1692238) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @03:55PM (#35495548)
    This is a dupe, links to an article that links to a study that has already been posted here: http://yro.slashdot.org/story/11/03/07/180210/Piracy-In-Developing-Countries-Driven-By-High-Prices [slashdot.org]
    Basically, music and software are priced to USA's average wage. Since the cost of life in other places is lower, and wages are lower, then it becomes prohibitively costly. Hence piracy.
    • by hjf (703092)

      Things are much more expensive, in USD, outside USA. A Playstation 3 costs USD 800 down here in Argentina. Games are priced at over $100. It's not about taxes either. The rationale is this: "People are going to pirate. We don't have a chance to sell to middle and lower classes, only higher classes. And we can charge a lot more if we market it as a 'luxury' item".

      Not true at all, but they like to believe that.

  • http://yro.slashdot.org/story/11/03/07/180210/Piracy-In-Developing-Countries-Driven-By-High-Prices [slashdot.org] It's the exact same report. But then again, it's not like CmdrTaco closely follows slashdot or anything ;)
  • Pirated software is free. There is no way to compete with that at any price. People who are willing to pirate software will, no mater what the software costs.
    • by SpeZek (970136)

      Plenty of businesses pay for RHEL, despite it being "free". Support, peace-of-mind, and ease are all worth cash over the absolutely free DIY alternative.

      There's a reason strictly multiplayer games like WoW are hardly pirated: you're paying for the experience (AKA the servers you play on) not the disc. It's also why Netflix and other a la carte services are so popular: paying for the convenience and peace-of-mind knowing that if you want a movie, you can just get it. Sure there will always be a minority that

    • by Surt (22457) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:21PM (#35495890) Homepage Journal

      Pirated software has an opportunity cost. When the legit cost of your app is cheaper than the time opportunity cost of finding the pirated version, you will make a sale to all but the stupidest of pirates.

    • by MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @05:42PM (#35497024)

      Pirated software is free. There is no way to compete with that at any price.

      Yet plenty of games, music, and movies have been quite successful despite pirated copies being available before the official release.

      Face facts: People are willing to pay for stuff. If we were the big stingy tight asses these industries all thought we were, Starbucks would never have been a massive success and iTunes would simply be a bit of trivia only Slashdotters would be aware of.

    • It's not only the price, but the ease of use. If it is easier to buy something at a relatively cheap price (to most people), then they will do that.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @03:58PM (#35495602)

    if you charge a fair price for the product (which is fair for the market concerned), make the product easily accessible to people who want it, AND DON'T TREAT THEM LIKE CRIMINALS most people will be happy to pay for your product. The ones who don't want to pay even then? You really weren't going to make any money off of them anyway.

  • NOT THEFT (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Uberbah (647458) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:04PM (#35495666)

    How many times do we have to go over this? With theft, you're removing something from the owner so he/she no longer has that item - that's never an issue with copyright infringement.

    They are two entirely different violations of the law, just as arson and cannibalism are two entirely different violations of the law. You can try and tie yourself up in a pretzel trying to say that oranges are just like apples, but it just doesn't work. And please, pretzels, skip all the usual straw men - copyright infringement is still a violation of the law and no one is claiming otherwise.

  • Individual songs are so cheap on iTunes I never pirate music and I'm extremely happy to pay. If I could get e-book rentals for two weeks, movie rentals a week, and episodes at the same time as they air in the USA for $1 I've give them even more of my money! Buying movies in iTunes for $5, and being able to buy them at the same time as they come out in the cinema for around $10 would be great too.
  • ... be a little less efficient at concentrating wealth?

    Duh! Revolutions have been fought over this shit. Cake, anyone?

  • by wmeyer (17620) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:06PM (#35495704)

    The easiest way to stop illicit trade is to remove the huge profits. True for software, true for street drugs, true for pretty much any commodity. Prohibition doesn't work; lack of profit does.

  • I've been watching "Louise" (see http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1492966/ [imdb.com] or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louie_(TV_series) [wikipedia.org] ) on Netflix recently. Last night I went to Netflix, and tried to cue up the next episode. Instead of getting to watch episode 10 like I had episode 1 through episode 9, it was only available on DVD, and the DVD wasn't released yet. Some time in the last week or two, they changed. So, I could either put the DVD for a season I had almost finished watching on my "Save" list, or I could go l
  • People pirate 99 cent songs. Lower prices will not prevent that. It's a dollar...seriously...how much cheaper than one dollar will something have to be before people stop pirating it? Answer: $1.

  • That's the verdict of a major new academic study

    The reality is, this is pure bullshit. For decades pirates claimed they need only lower prices and it would be the end of piracy. And so, we can how the sub-$0.99 cent music market and piracy is still raging; if not growing. The simple truth is, far too many studies, not to mention history which completely invalidates this study before it was written, proves price is almost never (only for a tiny minority is price) a significant factor in piracy.

    • Yes that's why Amazon and iTunes failed. I mean, nobody wanted to buy anything... oh... wait.

      I have a feeling that music piracy probably makes up less P2P traffic now than it has in years. Anecdotally, I have bought more music in the last year than the last half dozen.

      And point me to one of these "invalidating" studies that wasn't commissioned directly or indirectly by the very industries that want to artificially inflate prices.
  • Offer more value (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Khopesh (112447) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:14PM (#35495790) Homepage Journal

    the only way to tackle it is for copyright holders to charge consumers less money for their wares

    ... or add more value. Make the box something customers want, use e-ink displays on something included in the package. Stuff a Tee shirt or roll a poster in there. Add more digital content (games, featurettes, etc) since the file-sharing content tends to be just the bare product. Add a raffle ticket to each purchase that could win some one-of-a-kind memorabilia or else a signed picture.

    This isn't hard, nor is it novel. The cost of this media has stayed reasonably steady while its perceived value has dropped considerably. I haven't downloaded a movie in the past 5+ years, yet I've stopped buying them new. Five years ago, I'd buy a used movie for $10 as long as it had some featurettes. Now, my threshold is probably $7, which is four dollars less than five years ago (when adjusting for inflation). I bought In Rainbows [slashdot.org] for $5 and the Humble Indie Bundle [slashdot.org] for $20.

  • by HermMunster (972336) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:16PM (#35495822)

    Reducing prices makes a big difference in how the consumer perceives what they bought. It is actually rare to have a company succeed by increasing prices by distorting the value of their product (for example, Apple). The music industry for example has super high prices and those prices have been extremely high forever. Even at $10.00 per CD the prices is outrageous.

    Lately I've heard about how some book and program authors have made significantly more money selling their products at $.99 than even at $2.99. Sometimes the income has risen dramatically. The problem with the music industry is that they want to keep their old business model and sell at the same price thus keeping themselves living as billionaires. The consumer on the other hand has said "definitely no" to those prices. Music stores have gone out of business and the sales emphasis is really focused on digital online sales. But the music industry keeps pushing the numbers because they think they'll make even more if they box us into their old price structure.

    The internet changes one significant variable. That is distribution. The internet gives everyone a chance to open their own stores online. Buy what you need JIT and resell. You do the shipping and maintain a minimal workforce. Contrast that with what the music industry wants--to control distribution. In controlling that channel they can determine the prices, even going so far as having the RIAA member companies fix the prices. The internet widely opens almost every market to anyone. Getting your target audience's attention or even growing your target audience is vastly simplified. This is far different than it was even 30 years ago.

    The consumer knows it costs less to produce digital works and to distribute them, therefore there's no need to keep paying the high price, so they download the music for free instead of caving in to the music industry's demands. What the music industry doesn't understand is that the ability to get the attention of more people and to let them sample the music is vastly increased via the internet. That means they can continue to grow their businesses with digital sales at significantly lower prices because of that access.

    So, to me, the basic premise of price reduction is spot on. Dunce-heads in various industries affected by free digital downloads are killing their own business and giving away the market to others to control (i.e., Apple, Amazon, etc.) To those dunce-heads: lower your prices because we the consumer know that your costs are significantly reduced and your access to the consumer is vastly expanded. And, while you are at it, go back and give those artists what they deserve and stop stealing from them.

    • My personal sweet spot for buying music (right now I don't either pirate OR buy music) is 10 cents/track and the ability to buy only the tracks I want. That's like $1/CD.

      $.99 per track is way too high.

      So I agree with you, the price asked for music is too high by 10x. I'd probably buy a considerable amount at $.1/track, above that and I won't buy. But I won't pirate in any case.

      Right now I primarily "consume" music via broadcast.

      --PM

  • The only way? Stop? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by N0Man74 (1620447) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @04:18PM (#35495856)

    It's naive to think it's the only way, or to think it will actually stop it.

    It will reduce piracy, at least among groups that are motivated to pirate based on the price barrier, but that's not the only type of group.

    From my experience, pirates tend to be broken up into these main categories:

    - People who pirate because they can't afford to be legit (at least not on everything), or simply think the prices are too high and refuse to pay the price being asked.
    - People who pirate because they are digital hoarders, and they wouldn't care what the price is. They just collect data for bragging rights, to explore all the data that's out there, for trading, or 'just in case' they need or want it one day (or in case someone else might want or need it.) Or maybe it's just to be rebellious.
    - People who pirate for trial purposes, to help them in making a buying decisions. Despite skepticism to the contrary, some of these actually buy.
    - People who pirate in order to avoid the bad user experiences that are often associated with buying legitimately these days, and who might actually be legit if there were less hassle involved.

  • This is what I've figured, and I have mixed feelings about it. As a consumer, of course I'm all in favor of lower prices. But as someone who hopes to create stories and art and software and other things, and to do that for a living, it's depressing. The Big Media represented by the RIAA and MPAA and a dozen or so novelists may be getting money for nothing and chicks for free, and there's the occasional two-guys-and-a-dot-com success story, but most independent creators (in various media) are already stru

  • and it hasn't affected their pricing models.

    Back when recording sales had to support factories to churn out discs or tapes, and the trucks and brick and mortar stores to distribute them, one could argue that music should have cost more than it should now because none of that stuff is needed any more. But has the pricing changed? No- music downloads cost about the same as the same music would have cost back when it was supporting all that expensive infrastructure. Now add in the fact that most music is

  • How bout limiting the bandwidth between residentially leased subnets, and only offering full bandwidth to legitimate commercially owned networks? That would go a long way toward preventing piracy the way it is implemented these days (e.g. Bit Torrent, and other p2p protocols).

    • by Kaldaien (676190)

      I should maybe make that a bit clearer... throttle the bandwidth of a residential connection connecting to another residential host. Remove the throttling when the residential connection connects to a commercial host.

      • by tombeard (126886)

        Why should we throw away communications freedom just to support an industry pricing plan?

  • Note: I do not defend or condone piracy. I think it's generally wrong, but I do understand why it exists;

    I think it's also a matter of accessibility.

    1. There is simply no legal alternative to Torrent-sites with the same range of content, at the same "same-site"-convenience and instant gratification of a download. Nomatter what price the consumer is willing to pay.
    2. For anyone interested in video-content, compatibility with the media-center is key. Due to various DRM-mechanisms and special-delivery-methods

  • I'm sorry, I have a hard time believing this.

    The study deals with "pricing problems" in emerging global economies. If the contention is that in such economies, digital media are priced out of the market, well and good. Reduce your prices, you will probably see an uptick in sales.

    But isn't it a common Slashdot rejoinder, whenever someone claims to have "lost a sale to piracy," that a pirate is someone who would not have purchased your media anyway? You can't have it both ways. I live in the U.S., which I don't think would be considered an "emerging economy" for the purposes of the study. If prices here are at least more proportional to the perceived value of the product than in developing countries, why do Americans still pirate media?

    I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the overwhelming majority of people who pirate media do so because their notion of a "pricing problem" is that the product has a price on it, period. Didn't we have a story here a while back indicating that most people who pirate in the U.S. do so because it's a way to get free stuff? Come on--technology provides people with a means to obtain what they want (albeit unlawfully), at no cost to themselves, with no apparent injury to any visible person, and virtually zero likelihood of getting caught. Do we really believe a significant number of the people who avail themselves of that opportunity do so because their acceptable price point is somewhere above nothing?

    We can claim that reducing prices may reduce piracy (although, rather like the lost sales claims made by major rights-holders, such claims are difficult to back up with hard data). But pretending that cutting prices will make piracy vanish (or even meaningfully reduce it) is laughable.
  • by jedidiah (1196) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @05:09PM (#35496598) Homepage

    Is there a term or concept in English or German that's kind of like the inverse of Shadenfreude? Instead of being happy that misfortune has befallen someone, you are upset that something good has happened to someone else. That seems to be the real problem with the industry and armchair moralists here. They are too busy being Puritans to notice or care if they benefit from the situation.

  • by divisionbyzero (300681) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @05:10PM (#35496610)

    The authors go out of their way to say that moral condemnation of piracy doesn't make sense but I wonder if that also applies to the moral satisfaction that some people take in "punishing" greedy copyright holders by pirating their stuff? I tend to think that people that get off on giving a middle finger to copyright holders would pirate no matter what the price and therefore their moral self-righteousness is just as much bullshit as the moral indignation of the copyright holders.

  • by Chowderbags (847952) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @05:23PM (#35496782)
    There are two ceilings to worry about: The price for which your product is worth it, and the amount of work I have to do to actually access your product.

    The first one was my primary concern as a college student. I just plain didn't have the money to buy everything that I'd want to, especially at say a $50-$60 price point for games, and a $20 price point for movies. I did, however, have a lot of time and a fat internet pipe going straight to my room.

    The other side, which is more relevant now, is the work I have to do. I can buy enough entertainment at retail prices to keep me busy, so quite frankly, if your game/movie/music requires me to put a bunch of time into getting it to work, I'll move onto the next thing and not give you my money or find a crack, but if the pirates are offering a better product, why go through legit sources? If I literally can't get your product (hello everything stuck in licensing hell), you leave me exactly one option to get your series.

    Basically, if you want to make more money, don't make it easier for people to pirate your shit than pay for it. Sure, this may not work for some things (no, I will not give out my credit card to some starving artist using a shady pay service who only wants a buck for his album, I probably won't get it at all at that point), and you'll probably never get college students to pay full price for everything (you can't get blood from a stone), but make it easier for people who work all day and don't want to jump through 8 layers of hoops just to play their fucking game for an hour or two a night.
  • by nlawalker (804108) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @05:29PM (#35496862)

    Discussion in these threads always centers on cost and not value, and value is where the center of the struggle is. How does one determine the value of a copy of an artistic work in a digital format, especially in comparison to ye olden times when buying music meant buying a physical object that couldn't be perfectly, freely and infinitely copied? The industry would like to pretend that the value hasn't changed. Rampant copyright infringement results in some pretty heavy cognitive dissonance on the part of consumers: is this song worth what I paid for it, is it worth more (obviously I wouldn't have paid for it if it was worth less... right?), or is it worth nothing because it doesn't cost anything to make a copy that is as good as the original?

  • by MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @05:31PM (#35496890)

    There is no 'stopping piracy'. You can't. "Satisfy customers", instead.

  • by tombeard (126886) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @06:05PM (#35497248)

    Looking just at my interest in music, I would say that I have downloaded everything ever published that I am likely to ever have interest in. I think the music industry should make their entire catalog available "free for personal use" and collect ad revenue. They could charge a premium for new releases and milk the discount curve until it is moved onto the archive, after say a year. They could still try selling commemorative sets and artist collections; things that make nice gifts. The only problem I see with this model is that they haven't released anything I would pay for in the last three years.

  • by nurb432 (527695) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @07:45PM (#35498298) Homepage Journal

    it is VALUE that is the key. Even if its dirt cheap, if its crap, no one will want to buy it.

  • by master_p (608214) on Tuesday March 15, 2011 @07:55PM (#35498386)

    Contrary to the /. spirit, I say that piracy is theft.

    It's simple:

    I sell a product for 10 bucks.

    You buy this product. I make 10 bucks.

    You pirate this product. I don't make 10 bucks. You have something I sell without me having the profit from the product.

    If that is not theft, I don't know what it is. You robbed me of my 10 legally entitled bucks.

    The rest are cheap excuses.

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