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ACS: Law Withdraws Pursuing Illegal File-Sharers 105

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the sad-about-that dept.
Necroloth writes "As mentioned previously on Slashdot, ACS: Law has been sending out letters to thousands of alleged file-sharers on behalf on its client, MediaCAT. However, solicitor Andrew Crossley has now ceased all work on such cases, citing criminal attacks and death threats. Judge Birss doesn't seem to be taken by this, and comments, 'I am getting the impression with every twist and turn since I started looking at these cases that there is a desire to avoid any judicial scrutiny.' Judge Birss is expected to deliver his judgment on the case later in the week... perhaps all is not lost in the British judicial system."
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ACS: Law Withdraws Pursuing Illegal File-Sharers

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  • Re:It's good news (Score:5, Informative)

    by Andy_R (114137) on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @12:59PM (#34995902) Homepage Journal

    Part of the problem in this particular case was that these cases couldn't be defended against, since the accusers didn't actually take the cases to court, preferring instead to send more threats, or just move on to the next potential victim leaving the threat hanging. The hearing in the article was the first time a judge ever saw a contested ACS:law filesharing case, and even then ACS tried (unsuccessfully) to drop all the cases before the the court date.

  • It get's worse (Score:5, Informative)

    by Locke2005 (849178) on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @02:38PM (#34997556)
    The new company pursuing the claims, GCB, is a dormant company that was "borrowed" from a friend by none other than... Andrew Crossley. It's real owner, David Fisher, now disavows any connection and advises anyone who received a demand letter from GCB to ignore it. (See the techdirt article for more info.) So while publicly proclaiming he was "no longer persuing" file downloader, Crossley was in fact still persuing them, but trying to obfuscate who was actually responsible.
  • Re:It's good news (Score:5, Informative)

    by Xest (935314) on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @03:02PM (#34997888)

    "The hearing in the article was the first time a judge ever saw a contested ACS:law filesharing case, and even then ACS tried (unsuccessfully) to drop all the cases before the the court date."

    Indeed, at every step of the way ACS:Law has been trying to scare people into just giving them money, it was becoming common knowledge that their demands had no teeth and that they weren't really taking people to court, and so ACS:Law decided to up the game and see if actual real substantial threats of court action would turn that tide. What ACS:Law didn't count on was people not actually bowing down and settling, they didn't count on people actually trying to fight their case in court, and this is why they are now shitting bricks.

    It's a high stakes bit of brinkmanship - one side would be set to pay hefty fees if they lose, the other would see their entire business model destroyed. ACS:Law appears to have folded first, and lost the game.

  • Re:intimidation... (Score:2, Informative)

    by mcgrew (92797) * on Tuesday January 25, 2011 @04:25PM (#34998904) Homepage Journal

    Those that are more inclined to file share for financial reasons have little to loose in the high stakes legal arena... Emotionally speaking, intimidation by threat is a loosing move.

    I don't think you said what you intended to say.

    a : to let loose (see 1loose): release b : to free from restraint
    2: to make loose : untie
    3: to cast loose : detach
    4: to let fly : discharge
    5: to make less rigid, tight, or strict : relax
    intransitive verb
    : to let fly a missile (as an arrow) : fire
      See loose defined for English-language learners
    Examples of LOOSE
    The soldiers loosed a volley of rifle fire.

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