Slashdot stories can be listened to in audio form via an RSS feed, as read by our own robotic overlord.

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Australia Government The Internet Your Rights Online

Report Finds More Aussie Gov't Workers Misusing Internet 90

Posted by timothy
from the surely-that-would-never-happen-here dept.
destinyland writes "A new report to Australia's parliament announces a 54% increase in government workers misusing the internet. In fiscal year 2010, 313 different federal workers came under investigation for improper use of e-mail or the internet, up from just 202 in the previous year. The report — available online as a PDF file — also discovered that nearly half the investigated workers were in the Australian Tax Office, according to an Australian technology blog. 'Maybe it's just a case of particularly boring work making such distractions more attractive,' they suggest, since the report blames most of the discovered cases on one-time incidents of poor judgment."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Report Finds More Aussie Gov't Workers Misusing Internet

Comments Filter:
  • by timeOday (582209) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:18PM (#34453158)
    Huge year-to-year changes are more likely to result from changes to enforcement rather than changes to actual behavior.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      Exactly. The article also lacks a good definition of the term "Misusing Internet." There exists a wide continuum including banking, shopping, reading news, playing games, forums, social networking and outright industrial espionage. There is also the question of whether these activities are done on break time or not.
    • by lorelorn (869271)
      It's more likely a change in the rules and/or a change in their definition of 'misuse'. The rules for this change all the time and the same site can be blocked or unblocked (like Slashdot!) depending on the whim of the IT Director. But certainly, it's not due to a change in behaviour.
    • by Eskarel (565631)

      In this particular instance it's more likely to be related to the fact that the tax office had a major problem with their computer systems during fiscal year 2010 and the tax office couldn't actually process diddly squat for several months and therefor these drones had no work to do.

  • by DoofusOfDeath (636671) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:18PM (#34453160)

    I demand the Australian Government sends a strong message that this won't be tolerated. They must dissolve the Australian Tax Office.

  • by Aerorae (1941752) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:21PM (#34453182)
    Government workers are people too. Just like the people in businesses all around the world shopping for shoes on the clock.
    • by hedwards (940851)
      I'm a bit surprised that there isn't any policy barring this sort of thing. I guess it probably depends what the job is, but if you're just needing access to email and a couple of known sites, whitelisting those sites and blocking everything else isn't that hard.

      I remember the last time I had a job with internet, they were pretty clear that the connection belongs to the employer and that any use of it for anything that wasn't specifically sanctioned would lead to discipline.
      • by AuMatar (183847) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:52PM (#34453406)

        And do you have any idea what that would do to employee morale? To work for a place that's that draconian? You'd lose more productivity to that then you ever would to the internet. Not to mention many of your best employees would leave over time to any of the 99% of employers who don't give a fuck so long as your work gets done.

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Memorize all your pr0n before leaving the house, and recall images as necessary.

        • Parent is right.

          Hell, why not treat it as a benefit, like free sodas? I recently managed to talk our employer into doing just that... As long as you're not divulging company secrets, moonlighting, or surfing pr0n on our machinery, well? We really don't give a shit as long as you get your work done.

          As a bonus, I don't have to futz around on the proxy as much building reports on who may be goofing off, which in turn gives me an extra hour during the week to go do something useful on the network. It also means

      • by MoonBuggy (611105) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:52PM (#34453416) Journal

        Although superficially logical, I dislike this attitude. Relaxed, happy workers are generally more productive and of greater value to the company - showing them respect (and giving them the chance to blow off a little steam) by simply stating that they must maintain an acceptable level of productivity (hard to quantify, I know, but decent management should be able to roughly gauge how much work someone's getting done) is likely to work a lot better in the long run. Basic rules about illegal downloading and the like should obviously be in place, and if an employee is messing about online to the extent that it's detrimental to their work then of course disciplinary measures are in order, but telling your workers exactly how they must behave breeds resentment - telling them what they have to achieve and leaving it up to them to decide how to do so is a far more sensible tactic.

        • by plover (150551) *

          happy workers are generally more productive and of greater value to the company

          I spotted the problem in your logic above. We're discussing government agencies, not a for-profit company. Governments, as a rule, have always treated their civil servants with the least amount of civility possible. And production apparently never enters into the equation, which is why when on the rare occasion they have enough people to do the job in a timely fashion, they cut the budgets, shed a truckload of them and delays once again become the norm. Standard operating procedures for government agenc

          • by dwarfsoft (461760)
            Gov't jobs here IMO are usually on par with the levels of draconianism of private industry if not more lenient. The inneficiencies are generally from the bureaucracy, so there is usually ample time to goof off while waitingfor requests to go through.
          • Indeed. The only people who governments treat with less respect than civil servants, are the ones paying the bills...

        • by hedwards (940851)
          Maybe I'm old fashioned, but I don't think that screwing around on the internet doing non-work things ought to be acceptable. Personally, I don't want to have my morale harmed by being asked to pick up the slack because there isn't enough productivity to cover the work needed. Doesn't matter whether it's too few employees or too much goofing off online.

          Unless a job requires the internet as one of it's functions it's easier for everybody to just not have it, or agree that you're not going to use it except
          • heya,

            Sorry, but I think it's not just case of being old-fashioned, but being blind to how things *really* were like before.

            See, the thing is, as other posters have noted, so-called internet "misuse" is easy to monitor. You just check your firewall/proxy logs.

            But in the olden days, if a worker was distracted, or chatting at the watercooler, or just staring off into space for a few minutes, you couldn't really log that (unless you had audio surveillance at work, as well as mind-reading devices). Heck, they co

          • by macshit (157376) <miles@ g n u.org> on Sunday December 05, 2010 @09:20PM (#34455744) Homepage

            Maybe I'm old fashioned, but I don't think that screwing around on the internet doing non-work things ought to be acceptable. Personally, I don't want to have my morale harmed by being asked to pick up the slack because there isn't enough productivity to cover the work needed. Doesn't matter whether it's too few employees or too much goofing off online.

            It strongly depends on the job. If your business only requires mouth-breathers, you can do what you want, because you're scraping the bottom of the barrel anyway; they're desperate. But if you need employees with some degree of intelligence/creativity/etc, and you go all control-freak, you will lose all the good ones.

            Your choice I suppose.

            [Of course logic rarely has anything to do with it -- authoritarian bosses tend to be that way for personal reasons, not because it's actually the best way to run their business...]

      • by HungryHobo (1314109) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:53PM (#34453422)

        whitelisting can be a bigger sometimes though.
        I know when trying to figure out wierd application errors googling is generally the fastest way to find people who've had the same problem and how they've fixed it.
        I'd hate to be working on similar problems with a whitelist stopping me from viewing the thousands of tech support forums out there.
        I'd waste countless hours getting the same or worse info from documentation or trying to figure it out from scratch.

        ever tried to work out what "assertion error 266" or whatever the cryptic error is without google?
        With google: 20 seconds.
        without google or the internet: 20 minutes to hours.

        • by turing_m (1030530)

          I'd hate to be working on similar problems with a whitelist stopping me from viewing the thousands of tech support forums out there

          It can be done. You really need to have google's old preview working though. You used to get to it by doing a standard search, and then opening up "more search tools". You could see a paragraph or so of the relevant information, and often that was enough to figure out how to solve the problem. It's not there any more. I really wish google would turn that feature back on. Hint,

      • by obarel (670863)

        People monitor the things that are easy to monitor, that's all.

        It's very easy for the IT department to log every improper use of the internet connection, but not so easy to make sure that people work while they sit at their desks.

        Are they thinking about work right now, or about their dog's broken leg?

        Do they keep making mistakes and then correcting them (strictly speaking a waste of their employer's time and money) or maybe working more slowly than what they're capable of?

        Are they annoying their co-workers

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by BarryHaworth (536145)

        I'm a bit surprised that there isn't any policy barring this sort of thing. I guess it probably depends what the job is, but if you're just needing access to email and a couple of known sites, whitelisting those sites and blocking everything else isn't that hard. I remember the last time I had a job with internet, they were pretty clear that the connection belongs to the employer and that any use of it for anything that wasn't specifically sanctioned would lead to discipline.

        Oh, there's a policy all right, and a comprehensive system of filtering of content. Without having a copy of the policy in front of me (I'm not browsing Slashdot at work :-), sites such as online email and social media are are prohibited outright and will display a "Blocked" message if you try to access them, others are questionable in some way and will display a "Coached" message, meaning that you can still click through, but be warned that your access is being monitored and you may be called on to justif

    • by obarel (670863) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:42PM (#34453360)

      I don't even know what "Improper use" is. Shopping for shoes online? Sending an e-mail to your wife? Checking the news, weather, traffic jams? Going on Facebook?

      Strictly speaking, even going the toilet is a waste of public money. But seriously... is day-dreaming for five minutes better than going on the Internet for five minutes?

      • by yuhong (1378501)

        Agreed, way too vague. And indeed treating people as dumb automaton that always work 8 hours a day is a horrible idea in most cases these days.

      • by maxwell demon (590494) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:52PM (#34453408) Journal

        IMHO "misusing the internet" should only apply for sending spam, doing DoS attacks, hacking other computers, and things like that. If I look out of the window instead of working, am I misusing the window?

        • As someone who went back to school after 10 years in the workforce, I really understand how poor this is. I waste time like nobody's business while at "work" now. But you know what? My brain is working the whole time. 2 hours surfing the web, and I might just figure out what's not working in my code. I might go home, and on the bus ride back, figure out what the problem is. I might get home, pour a beer, put my feet up, feel guilty for wasting 4 hours that afternoon, and crank through more work than I would
      • by thegarbz (1787294)
        Improper use is a grey area, however some people should just apply common fucking sense and see their interpretation is pitch black of what is and isn't improper. Gordon Brown buying stuff on ebay in the middle of a parliamentary sitting is improper. These buffoons get paid a fortune to do a small amount of work and even then they don't pay attention.

        Not improper enough? How about Kiddy porn viewed on parliament computers [smh.com.au]
      • by mibe (1778804)
        Agreed. That's taxpayer funded poop they're flushing!
    • by Mordie (1943326)
      Government IT departments just cant deal with the crappy government policiy. and so we spend our time on slashdot, hence the huge number of workers slacking off not fixing government computers. oh wait....
  • Makes you wonder what costs more: 313 federal workers shopping for shoes on the clock, or the 313 investigations into their behavior that ensued.
    • They will be conduced by federal workers, who will spend much of the time looking for shoes, apparently. So, it blows up very quickly.

  • Oh no. (Score:4, Funny)

    by Opportunist (166417) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:44PM (#34453372)

    After years and years of abuse by the Australian government and the laws they made concerning it, now the internet also has to suffer the misuse by Australien government workers.

    Would someone please think of the electrons?

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Just for the sake of clarity. The Australian Government has not actually made any laws about the Internet. They've just talked about it.

  • by Trepidity (597) <delirium-slashdotNO@SPAMhackish.org> on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:50PM (#34453396)

    Maybe it's different in areas other than tech, but in technology, both in industry and in academia, there isn't much correlation between the productivity of a worker and their tendency to "misuse the internet". There are plenty of very productive people who also post on Twitter a few times a day, take a brief detour while googling for an answer to a tech question to answer a question on StackOverflow that came up in the search, glance at a few mailing lists, and check their personal gmail compulsively. Especially for people under 35 or so, it might actually correlate positively with productivity: the kinds of people who can't keep themselves from answering StackOverflow questions, reading / posting on mailing lists, etc., are often much more proactive and plugged into many parts of the tech scene, compared to the people who just keep their head down and put in their 8 hours.

    • by javakah (932230) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:57PM (#34453438)

      From what I've seen of this, the flip side of this is that such people are also much more likely to be checking work email, etc. after hours. So if something suddenly comes up during non-normal hours, it's more likely to be dealt with quickly as part of a give-and-take approach. It's a blending of personal and working life. Yes, you do have to accept that some personal matters will be dealt with during work hours, but work matters will then sometimes be dealt with during personal hours.

      • You hit the nail on the head. I just posted above how much more productive I am with no set hours. I have a weekly progress meeting with my boss. I work in my head while surfing the web, on the bus ride home, with my feet up and a beer in hand. I work drunk off my ass, on a sunday night. I get shit done, set the alarm late, and sleep in.

        I've had time cards, punch machines, and morning check-ins. I do so much more work with nothing more than a weekly progress meeting. And I love life.

        The big key here is
    • by plover (150551) *

      If your company is large enough, it can provide a participatory body that's of positive value to the company. Set up an internal corporate wiki, a corporate stackoverflow, a corporate forum, and a corporate blog site. Encourage your employees to spend some time participating in online activities that mutually benefit each other.

      Will it be as useful as stack overflow? Probably not, but it may be more specific, and you can discuss company ideas and applications without breaking confidentiality.

    • One thing that isn't often considered is that we all use multi-tasking OS's and sometimes whatever app you're using to work is the bottleneck. If your work program is spending 2 minutes doing a file save, where's the harm in doing a little shoe shopping while you're waiting?

  • by santax (1541065) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:57PM (#34453440)
    Don't get me wrong, under normal circumstances I love the Aussies. But they are such bad winners. Whenever I lose a game of chess to an Aussie they say: mate mate. Come one - I can see it's mate! Don't have to tell me twice. A bunch of insensitive clods, that's what they are!
  • If this is just one-offs in judgement as indicated, big deal! There's a vast difference between people like the completely useless bozo I unfortunately work with who spends the entire day alternating bewteen MSN, and Facebook, and people who might access the odd online shop or whatever inbetween work. It's funny how the OZ Gov can blow billions on wasteful projects, (the insulation scheme of death comes to mind, along with Myki), but they worry about a number of people who might have used internet for a non
    • by sjames (1099)

      What you don't realize is that that useless bozo is saving tones of productivity by spending his day on the internet. Otherwise, he'd cause about 9 man hours worth of damage for each 8 hours he worked.

  • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @04:12PM (#34453552) Journal
    These studies about (almost always public sector) workers and their terrible, terrible internet misuse seem like little more than ammunition for the handwringers, and maybe a couple of privatization zealouts.

    Reality: Unless chained to an assembly line, under guard, most workers are going to spend some minutes a day doing some form of "nonwork". Particularly for people whose work involves a mixture of thinking and typing, it won't even be trivial to distinguish between work and nonwork, and for people whose work involves manual labor, one has to make the distinction between "rest" and "slacking off".

    Given that the internet is a bottomless well of amusements, as well as an excellent way to check personal email, pay that credit card bill you just remembered to avoid a late fee, queue up a netflix item while you are still thinking about it from that conversation at lunch, etc. it seems pretty obvious that most of the white-collar nonwork is going to be internet related(and almost 100% of the visible kind is. If somebody spends 10 minutes 'cleaning their desk' in order to avoid work, nobody will ever know. If they spend 10 minutes on reddit, IT can know completely automatically.

    Now, as "IT" for an institution myself, I can sympathize with IT trying to block certain sorts of extracurriculars: I don't want to get a BSA beatdown because you were on warez.ru. I don't want to spend my already overstretched time battling viruses because you just had to download free smilies and/or goat porn. If the institution's attorney's come to me and say "We are being sued for creating a hostile, porn infested work environment." I would like to be able to say "Well, we have measures in place that meet or exceed industry standards for professional content filtering; but, as no programmatic filter can be perfect, we do ultimately depend on HR's training and disciplinary procedures." rather than "Well, goodbye to my career..."

    However, again in "IT"'s shoes, I don't give a fuck if you want to check your gmail, balance your checkbook, or do some online christmas shopping. If it doesn't mean legal exposure or substantial likelyhood of time consuming or costly network damage(thanks to 3rd party ad networks, virtually any site is a potential risk, but the known hives of scum and villainy are worse...) If your performance sucks, hopefully your performance reviews will reflect that and get you fired. If your performance doesn't suck, the cost of a few megabytes off our big fat institutional connection is A)sunk, we pay for the pipe whether we use it or not and B) probably less than your paperclip budget for the year. I. Don't. Care.

    Worker productivity is not a problem that you can solve by dicing up their workday and micromanaging what happens during every second. Decide what performance you want, fire people who don't meet it, keep people who do, promote people who exceed it. Don't fuck around with meaningless(but easy to measure) minutia: that is practically the definition of "cargo cult management".
    • by MoonBuggy (611105)

      If I hadn't already posted, I'd give you all my mod points for the next month! I sincerely hope that most companies (and governmental organisations) realise the wisdom in this line of thinking.

    • Oh, one other thing (this one actually causes the most friction with the users): we in "IT" generally have to block streaming music sites. This one strikes people as arbitrary and draconian; but the logic is actually pretty clear: unlike streaming video, which is bandwidth intensive but only somebody heading for a pink slip will need more than a few minutes a day of, streaming audio can easily replace the radio.

      Since our primary business is not internet related, we only have a nice-but-modest commercial
      • by Anonymous Coward

        Oh, one other thing (this one actually causes the most friction with the users): we in "IT" generally have to block streaming music sites. This one strikes people as arbitrary and draconian; but the logic is actually pretty clear: unlike streaming video, which is bandwidth intensive but only somebody heading for a pink slip will need more than a few minutes a day of, streaming audio can easily replace the radio.

        Speaking as a user, the difference between "arbitrary and draconian" and "annoying but reasonable" is how it's presented.

        All too often IT practices are presented as "This is a company resource. IT can institute whatever fucking policies we want, without having to explain ourselves. If you don't want to bend over and take it, quit." However accurate this may be, this comes off as arbitrary and draconian. On the other hand actually explaining, as you did, "constantly-on streaming radio takes up a lot of bandw

      • Once I get around to bringing headphones to the office, I'm going to plug it into my portable music player rather than fire up Pandora or something. Fair enough.
        I suppose understanding/appreciation of basic IT stuff form non-IT types like me is useful.

        My music player has a 2.5mm headphone jack rather than the standard 3.5mm, but I've been meaning to buy a special set or a conversion dongle anyways.

        Ooh, we have a literal water cooler in the office too.

  • How does this compare to other misuses? The biggest problem obviously is time wasted. So does Internet add to other waste of time or does it replace it? Does this abuse make them less productive or more productive?

    I hate these kind of studies as they are extremely one sided. Used to work for a company that did not allow surfing, so instead people where reading a newspaper. No problem, because it was not easily measurable by looking at a log.

    People are not 100% productive. Get over it and start figuring out

  • by bloodhawk (813939) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @04:42PM (#34453728)
    The reason the ATO is so high on the list has nothing to do with behaviour of its staff (at least there behaviour is no worse than any other departments staff) and everything to do with how strictly they enforce the rules. As someone that works with many of the agencies in Aus the enforcement ranges from ATO's strict handling of the issue to many other departments that do nothing at all or hand out warning for all but the worst breaches, hell I worked at one that specifically told me to disable logging as if they logged the traffic they would have to do something about it and they didn't have the policy's in place to handle the legal issues that would arise at the time.
  • That it is possible to "misuse" a tool that was built to do anything and everything. Sure it is on work time, but if your at your desk during lunch or doing a break at some point, there shouldn't be anything against rubbing one out. Assuming your in an office, not a cubicle anyways.

  • I am all for cracking down on misuse of the Internet... 100%. Just like the misuse of anything! I mean come on, think about it.

    Now the question is, "What is misuse of the Internet?" Which means the question is then, "What is the purpose of the Internet?" The purpose, design, and original intent of Internet access was to communicate openly and link to other content. If we have a bunch of individuals working for the Aussie government workings locking down the Internet, abusing privacy and preventing

    • by bloodhawk (813939)
      In the Aussie government you have no rights to privacy for what you do on government computers (rightly so), everything from your internet access to your email and instant messages (if they allow it) can be monitored and read. Internet Access is provided as a means to assist in doing your job and internet access policies nearly always explicitly state that the internet access is for use for specific government business related to your job. However most are at least lenient enough to let you check news, weat
      • Hear that sound? That was the main idea of my post flying at mach 12 a foot over your head. Well, not completely, you did state they are semi sane not demoralizing and also likely inhibiting their employees with locked down white-list only access.

        But let me help you out, the Aussie government as reported on Slashdot has been flirting with destroying the privacy and free access to the web in many ways. That should be what is an issue to be on Slashdot, this story? Not even in the idle section imho.

        • by bloodhawk (813939)
          It didn't fly over my head, was just trying to add some facts to it :-). Yes the Asussie government is trying to screw people over on privacy, but to be honest we have no one to blame but ourselves, people sold out to the labor government to get the NBN even though it meant leaving the labor nazi's in power to further remove our rights.
    • What is misuse of the Internet?

      Exactly. As guardians of what is sober and wholesome, I give Australian government workers the benefit of the doubt as to whether it is abuse. If dingo porn is wrong, then I don't want to be right.

  • The report — available online as a PDF file

    Wait, wait, wait! Didn't we decide last week on Slashdot that the Australian government shouldn't be posting any more PDFs? They make you go blind, or give you hairy palms, or something.

  • As a former government employee, I can attest to the fact that for large amounts of time I was not productively employed. In my case I knew Big Brother was watching so I did not goof off on the Internet. I did goof off in numerous other ways. The fact that the civil servants were goofing off is symptomatic of a bigger problem. A smart manager would realize that the public stewards just have too much time on their hands, and therefore their jobs can be eliminated. In other words the solution is NOT to b

  • http://www.internode.on.net/residential/broadband/adsl/extreme/performance/ [on.net]
    A graph of adsl2+ bitrate as the user gets further away from the exchange.
    Add in reality of crushed ducts, old copper, long loops, digital loop carriers (RIM), historical data caps with heavy per mb fines its easy to understand why a fast clean city backhaul like connection is so attractive.
    Unauthorised disclosure of information (e.g. leaks) is up too, thats good news :)
  • Frankly, if workers are able to misuse Internet, this means that no filtering proxy has been set up, and the IT didn't do their job (or at least, the upper management didn't ask for a proxy, probably because they 'misuse' Internet too).

    It's easy to fix that: just install a proxy, and block whatever site is 'misuse'.

    In my opinion, they should only set a proxy for blocking P2P, other download sites and porn.

    At my work, we have a proxy, and the most bandwidth-consuming site is Youtube.

  • Before it was the water-cooler and the phone.

  • So according to the numbers reported, 202 (last year) to 313 (this year), is a 54% increase, which means that the Aussie government is run by less than 750 people?
    I dunno, that is a big place. I think they deserve some break time.
  • Okay, so I work for the U.S. government, not the Aussies, but I'm betting it's similar there; as a fed, you spend a ridiculous amont of time waiting on things. I see no reason to vilify people who honestly can't do anything but twiddle their thumbs waiting for something else to happen.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      Okay, so I work as a contractor for an Australian government department, as an IT Security Administrator no less... by accessing pornography, pirated material, games etc. you're opening up a vector for attack which can be exploited by a variety of malware, from Flash exploits to browser exploits, all because you bastards want to use work resources for non-work reasons. Now, I don't care that much if people use work resources for non-work reasons but when it threatens the confidentiality, integrity and avail
      • Okay, I guess I wasn't explicit enough here.. I see no reason to vilify people for checking Facebook at work, as that is the kind of 'abuse' that 57% of workers are likely to be involved in. I agree that you should filter for porn, warez, etc.
        • by dbIII (701233)
          Unfortunately once management take a hand instead of just blocking malware there is "feature creep" and they decide it is a good way to stop those employees that piss them off by spending a lot of time on facebook (without going to the trouble of actually acting like a manager should and talk to the employee). You get stupid stuff like the blanket ban on any web access like I had to implement today, oddly enough. Of course watching the squid logs while I was setting it up showed that the manager that aske
          • by thijsh (910751)
            Just set the block message to something along the lines of: 'In accordance with company policy by decree of manager X access to this page is blocked until further notice.'. For extra effect add his internal phone number, of course you will then also need to mention your own number too with 'for all other technical non-policy related problems contact Y'.
            • by dbIII (701233)
              Yep, have the squid block page set up but all know where the policy came from anyway. However they know that talking back will get them in trouble. It's easier to waste time bitching to the IT guys and try to get some sort of exception. I expect hours of lost time.
              Just another pointless petty little annoyance that is trivial on the scale of things but worth mentioning since it's on topic and seems to be happening in a lot of places.
    • This came up in a business book I recently read, a hallmark of inefficient work processes - spending lots of time waiting between handoffs of work units, rather than actually completing the work. Sometimes it seems that an order of magnitude more time is spent on waiting.
      That analysis looked at the time ti takes a particular work unit to make its way through the chain, rather than the capacity utilization for particular employees; I'm analogizing.

  • Hello. Aussie here. That these lazy bums are wasting our taxdollars to surf the net doesn't really surprise me. The federal public service in Australia is a huge drain on the taxpayer. The federal government delivers very little to Australia. Most of the services are delivered by the states (paid via a consumption tax) and city councils (paid by rates); health, education, infrastructure.

    The federal government really delivers bugger all to the average Australian. They collect taxes through a very nasty fed

  • I love these stories of people 'misusing' internet.

    90% of the time it is just people surfing when they have no work to do. That is NOT mis-use of internet, anymore than having people carry a work blackberry when they are not being paid to be working violates overtime laws.

    If someone does their job, does not visit porn, does not use up excessive bandwidth, they are not 'misusing the internet'.

    If you don't do your job, then you should be fired, and it should NOT matter if you are not doing your job becau

  • 'Maybe it's just a case of particularly boring work making such distractions more attractive,' they suggest, since the report blames most of the discovered cases on one-time incidents of poor judgment."

    I'm here posting this instead of doing some data entry. Yeah, it helps blow off steam, but it's also easy to fall into a timesink.

No user-servicable parts inside. Refer to qualified service personnel.

Working...