Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Censorship The Internet The Media

WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort 586

Posted by timothy
from the mirror-mirror-on-the-net dept.
A beautiful mind writes "WikiLeaks is asking for hosting space on Unix-based servers. The replication is implemented by a rsync+ssh based push that copies static files to a known path, authenticated via the private half of this public key. The complete website is a few GB in size, making it feasible to replicate on a large scale. The mirror list will be published when the number of independent mirrors reaches 50." Note: wikileaks.ch seems to be down for the moment, but eventually the above links may require that instead of 213.251.145.96. See also this WikiLeaks address finder. And for even more news, try this Twitter search.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort

Comments Filter:
  • Make it static. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SanityInAnarchy (655584) <ninja@slaphack.com> on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:04PM (#34446592) Journal

    Lower the barrier of entry even further, and just throw up a torrent or ten of static files which can be hosted anywhere, without fear of compromising your own server.

    • Re:Make it static. (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Dan East (318230) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:20PM (#34446692) Homepage Journal

      Exactly. I do not like what Wikileaks has done, but even so I can be the devil's advocate, and say that EVERYONE should be pissed at Assange. Those that want the information to be free should be very concerned that Assange wants to release it piece meal, ramp up the drama and attention to him and his site as much as possible, and provide commentary (aka judgment) regarding the information. All this is doing is giving time for him and his site to be taken down. The US may move rather slowly and clumsily over these sorts of affairs, having to check the legality of this and that and get allies involved, etc, but given enough time, there's a good chance they will be able to get Assange on something.

      The files should ALL be placed online, in a distributed manner, and be done with. Not be Assange's little plaything to manipulate and play around with. Really, this guy has a major ego / power complex, and it will cost him eventually.

      • Re:Make it static. (Score:5, Interesting)

        by causality (777677) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:24PM (#34446714)

        Exactly. I do not like what Wikileaks has done, but even so I can be the devil's advocate, and say that EVERYONE should be pissed at Assange. Those that want the information to be free should be very concerned that Assange wants to release it piece meal, ramp up the drama and attention to him and his site as much as possible, and provide commentary (aka judgment) regarding the information. All this is doing is giving time for him and his site to be taken down. The US may move rather slowly and clumsily over these sorts of affairs, having to check the legality of this and that and get allies involved, etc, but given enough time, there's a good chance they will be able to get Assange on something.

        The files should ALL be placed online, in a distributed manner, and be done with. Not be Assange's little plaything to manipulate and play around with. Really, this guy has a major ego / power complex, and it will cost him eventually.

        I was going to make a post saying it's rather poor planning to only just now realize the necessity of a de-centralized distribution model... but I think your explanation gets closer to the heart of it. Unfortunately people with the very best of intentions can exhibit the kind of ego you're describing. It doesn't even have to be a deliberate act of self-glorification; it's more like a default state one can overcome.

        • Re:Make it static. (Score:5, Insightful)

          by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Saturday December 04, 2010 @10:38PM (#34447678) Homepage Journal

          I was going to make a post saying it's rather poor planning to only just now realize the necessity of a de-centralized distribution model.

          I think the most important part of wikileaks is not so much the content of the leaks, but the reaction of people in power to them.

          We have learned more about the connection between corporation and the power in the past week than we have in the past several years.

          While the content of the Citibank leaks will be most interesting, the all-out scramble to stop Wikileaks and jail Assange that started the day after it was announced that the next document dump would be from Citibank tells us a whole lot about where the power really lies in this world, and who's really in charge. It also shows just how much of what passes for "government" and "sovereign nation" is nothing but theater to keep us entertained while those that really rule the world execute their agenda. The way they took down wikileaks, severed their connection to donations and continue to play whack-a-mole with a website shows just how meaningless our "rule of law" really is when they really want to get rid of something and cover up some information about their activities.

          How fitting that Interpol should issue arrest warrants for Julian Assange and former Vice President Dick Cheney within 24 hours of each other. As I've said before, one of those two men was guilty of leaking the identity of a covert CIA agent and only one of those men has the blood of hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians on his hands. I wonder if Interpol will spend the same resources executing the arrest warrant on Cheney as they will on Assange. So an admitted traitor and war criminal can act with impunity but someone who simply publishes a web site of documents that other people provide is considered Public Enemy No 1.

          The Wikileaks Saga is an amazing story, and its just starting. There is the possibility, however remote, that the world can be a changed place because of Wikileaks.

          As Assange quoted Theodore Roosevelt: "“Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people...To destroy this invisible government, to befoul this unholy alliance between corrupt business and corrupt politics is the first task of statesmanship.”

          • Re:Make it static. (Score:4, Interesting)

            by dch24 (904899) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @11:53PM (#34448132) Journal
            I suppose Wikileaks is already aware of the possibility they may dissapear, and knows exactly how to take advantage of decentralized distribution.
          • by tobiah (308208)

            "How fitting that Interpol should issue arrest warrants for Julian Assange and former Vice President Dick Cheney within 24 hours of each other."

            Nigeria has just suggested they would request an arrest warrant through Interpol, in regards to an ongoing bribery investigation regarding oil and gas rights. Haliburton paid out about $600million in a settlement for this case, so there's something to it, but I really doubt there's going to be an arrest warrant.

            • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

              You're right, the arrest warrant on Dick "Mr Burns" Cheney is pending. I want to see what excuse they will come up with to Nigeria for not issuing it.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by benjamindees (441808)

            I think the most important part of wikileaks is not so much the content of the leaks, but the reaction of people in power to them.

            Exactly. If you didn't know 90% of the stuff in those leaks already, then you aren't going to learn anything from it being placed on some distributed servers somewhere and emanated via a thousand blogs and newspaper back-pages. You're going to learn it when there's a name and a face going around giving television interviews and provoking a backlash both from the established powers and from the ignorant public that maintains them. From what I have seen, Assange has done a deliberate and masterful job of a

      • Re:Make it static. (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Charliemopps (1157495) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:27PM (#34446736)
        He has to release it a bit at a time. The fact of the matter is, they have many many huge stories. If they release several bombshell issues at once, they are likely to have some of them ignored by the media because they'll just go after the most sensational stuff. They are playing the media like they should play the media.
        • Re:Make it static. (Score:4, Interesting)

          by The Living Fractal (162153) <banantarr.hotmail@com> on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:50PM (#34446932) Homepage
          The US may then benefit from attempting to crack the encrypted cables and releasing them all at once -- since they certainly can't eliminate them all now that they have been decentralized.

          Or, simply put, the US may not care very much. I haven't seen anything released that is a big surprise.
          • by grcumb (781340) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @09:59PM (#34447350) Homepage Journal

            The US may then benefit from attempting to crack the encrypted cables and releasing them all at once....

            I suspect that the US already has them in unencrypted form. 8^)

      • What you can attention seeking, I would call covering his ass. He's much protected if he's a "personality" than unknown.

        Also, the info has been coming out anyway, regardless of attacks and pressures, so I'm not sure what's the problem with the slow release. It's not like they can't release it faster if the need comes. For all we know, it may only need a couple KBs to all be released: the key to Insurance.aes256.

      • Re:Make it static. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by RAMMS+EIN (578166) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:39PM (#34446842) Homepage Journal

        Another point of view is that WikiLeaks had best inspect what they release, and do their best to prevent putting lives at risk, especially those of innocent bystanders and those who are working for the greater good. They're damned if they do and damned if they don't: if they take their time to filter and redact, they are delaying and possibly twisting the truth, but if they don't do that, they are irresponsible.

      • Re:Make it static. (Score:4, Insightful)

        by copponex (13876) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:41PM (#34446858) Homepage

        Assange has done more for Democracy, as in the right of people to direct the actions of their government, than the entire Western world has done since WWII. That's why the United States government is so pissed off: it despises the right of people to know what their government is up to with their tax dollars. It didn't want Pakistanis to know of their government's complicity in the drone strikes. It didn't want to admit that the puppet government in Afghanistan was riddled with corruption, even though the State Department has been aware of this fact since the beginning. Just like it didn't want it getting out that we have been systematically destroying democratic institutions, from Iran to Vietnam to Argentina to Palestine, because reality might upset some of it's electorate.

        Sure, Assange is kind of a douchebag. You don't think Patrick Henry was? Churchill? However, the marketing ploy of providing this narrative and stringing along the releases has kept this in the news far longer than the previous leaks. It's unfortunate that the mass media, which is owned by corporations, has no self-interest in the truth anymore. But the last hole that can be exploited is the desire to keep their ratings up, and he has done well to exploit this weakness in the system.

        If COINTEL PRO had been leaked in the same dramatic fashion, perhaps more people would remember it. The fourth estate is broken. It's going to take soap opera narratives with entertainment value targeted at the masses in order to fix it, which is a hell of a lot better than another war.

        The stage is now set to hopefully expose Bank of America or some other major institution for fraud and corruption. Personally, Assange is the only douchebag I would trust with that information. Everyone else in the media are compromised. They are fools, cowards, and intellectual prostitutes [constitution.org].

        • Bravo (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Slutticus (1237534) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @09:20PM (#34447094)
          Never have mod points when I really need them. I've never seen people so terrified of the truth since.....well....hmmm.... I'd REALLY like to get a look at those Cheney Energy Task Force documents that they've been hiding from us for 10 years. I can hope that these will be leaked eventually.
          • Re:Bravo (Score:5, Interesting)

            by Zancarius (414244) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @10:57PM (#34447824) Homepage Journal

            Never have mod points when I really need them. I've never seen people so terrified of the truth since.....well....hmmm.... I'd REALLY like to get a look at those Cheney Energy Task Force documents that they've been hiding from us for 10 years. I can hope that these will be leaked eventually.

            What I find funny is that a lot of Americans find this leak to be quite a relief. The only people who seem so pissed off about it are those in positions of power. They don't want us to know the truth, and at this point, I'd expect next year to see increasing pressure on things like the COICA and/or other measures to grant the Federal government the ability to censor information. Can't have the people finding out what their leadership is up to! Even some people on the right of the political spectrum here in the US (*raises hand*) are in favor of what WikiLeaks is doing; although, as I see it, you can't pick and choose your battles in pursuit of liberty, transparency, and fairness. That's why I see this as both hilariously entertaining and, generally, a good thing.

            It is comedic to me that the Obama administration has only managed to live up to their promise of offering the most transparent administration in history by way of an Australian foreign national leaking secretive wires that were handed over to him.

        • Re:Make it static. (Score:5, Insightful)

          by the eric conspiracy (20178) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @10:08PM (#34447426)

          Assange has done more for Democracy, as in the right of people to direct the actions of their government, than the entire Western world has done since WWII.

          So you think this is more important than say the Berlin Airlift, the Korean Police Action, the US involvement in the Greek Civil War, the Brussels Pact, the establishment of NATO, SEATO and the UN, the strategic arms limitation treaties, the opening of China/US diplomatic relations, the founding of the Solidarity Union, and the fall of the Soviet Union and the reunification of Germany. Combined.

          Poppycock.

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by copponex (13876)

            Let's go through your list:

            1. Berlin Airlift - Saved 2 million residents from going hungry, which was fallout from the partitioning of Europe between WWII allies

            2. Korean Police Action - Do you think North Koreans or Chinese have more freedoms today? Is there more suffering in rural China than in the DPRK?

            3. Greek Civil War - How is foreign government intervention democratic when the result is a dictatorship?

            4. Brussels Pact/NATO: currently the occupying force of Afghanistan.

            5. SEATO? The one that didn't do

      • Re:Make it static. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by leehwtsohg (618675) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:43PM (#34446886)
        Just to remind you - these latest cables are just the last and probably most significant of a huge list of things that wikileaks released. Look at the "all leaks archived" link on the wikileaks site for an incredible list of torrents of all the leaks that wikileaks already did, some of which already had great influence in some countries/companies (iceland, peru, australia...). It is not all about the US.

        I think that they are releasing the data so slowly, because there are many parts in it that have to be digested slowly - see for example the media flare up going on in spain because of the released documents, the clusterbombs issues in the UK, the anger in germany over the 15% overhead taken by the US army, etc. If it was all released in a day, such issues would be buried among hundreds of others of similar importance.

      • by Max_W (812974)

        You do not understand. Julian Assange wants to show the real situation with the freedom of press. He, like Alexander Solzhenitsyn, decided "to live not by lies". He is not like you and me, he is taking a stand, fighting for the truth. Even if this truth is extremely unpleasant and even destructive.

        Alexander Solzhenitsyn motto was: [Zhit ne po lzhi.] "Live not by lies.". He also broke some laws of that time, he had to go through horrors of GULAG, but such people, Like Alexander Solzhenitsyn or Julian Assange

  • by Jugalator (259273) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:17PM (#34446674) Journal

    Since it's already released. It's already been revealed at least in Swedish news, that part of the encrypted "insurance" file that's been distributed via BT, is the *full* cablegate archive -- remember that by far most haven't been released yet, at least not to non-news organizations. And that's part of that file, and then some unknown stuff too. So if anything would happen to these guys that would piss them off enough, they'd just release the keys and boom, thousands of users would have this data.

    • by IonOtter (629215)

      So if anything would happen to these guys that would piss them off enough, they'd just release the keys and boom, thousands of users would have this data.

      Assange: "If the unencrypted files are distributed, world governments will fall."

      Uncle Sam: "Even if it is unencrypted, it would take a number beyond reckoning — thousands — to distribute them all."

      Assange: "Tens of thousands."

      Uncle Sam: "But my lord there is no such force."

      [They walk to the balcony of the tower Wikileaks and Uncle Sam looks in

  • by nurb432 (527695) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:35PM (#34446808) Homepage Journal

    Once again ill say it. That is the perfect distribution method when you are being attacked by most of the free world.

    • ...much better than FreeNet and Tor can. http://geti2p.net/ [geti2p.net]

      Many of the Wikileaks releases (including video files) have already been posted to I2P bittorrent trackers.

    • by Burz (138833) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @12:17AM (#34448224) Journal

      Unofficial Wikileaks mirror on I2P [wikileaks.mirror.i2p]
      Yes, the full link really is that long. That is because I2P does not fully rely on domain names... that b64 string is the site's public key which is also it's address.

      * You need the I2P software (a FOSS project and free download) to use both of the above address. *

      The announce thread for the I2P mirror is here. [i2p2.de]

      Once the info for the new site propagates through the network, you can even access the I2P mirror *without* the I2P software using this URL. [i2p.to] Of course, using this method you won't be anonymous.

      A word about I2P: It's a network that provides anonymized IP-like communication using methods similar to Tor, but designed to handle torrents and other large loads efficiently. It is also less centralized than Tor, and taking down even 90% of the nodes (incl original ones) should still leave it running and accessible. It also has facilities for automatically mirroring files and sites. One downside is that configuring your browser to use the I2P Web is a manual process that must be done carefully. Overall though it seems to be pretty impressive.

  • by Alcoholic Synonymous (990318) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:36PM (#34446810)

    The current leaks are out. You cannot put the genie back in the bottle. Syncing around the world will do no good if the centralized source synced against keeps vanishing and eventually stays vanished.

    My point is, that the current damage is done. Yanking WikiLeaks offline is about preventing further damage, and when it finally does go for good, people will be left with a stagnant, yesterday's news version. A million mirrors of previously disclosed documents wont help future leaks get distributed, while the people mirroring the current ones are literally just stepping into harms way.

  • by owlnation (858981) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:36PM (#34446822)
    Operation Streisand!
  • by nurb432 (527695) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:38PM (#34446838) Homepage Journal

    Could this be the first real battle waged mostly in the digital world? Every free country is out to get this guy and prevent him from getting his word out. The outcome of this will speak volumes for the future for the concept of being able to speak your mind.

    ( yes, i know there is questions about legality of the data, but that isn't the real issue here )

  • This is fantastic (Score:5, Interesting)

    by frank_carmody (1551463) <<moc.liamg> <ta> <tnegordep>> on Saturday December 04, 2010 @08:56PM (#34446968)
    I live in Thailand and WikiLeaks is blocked here for some ridiculous reason. The more the 'authorities' around the world try to squeeze the balloon, the more it bubbles out somewhere else. So this is golden for me. The more they are forced to host their site in a non-conventional highly-distributed way, the easier it becomes for the people of Thailand to access it.
  • by unity100 (970058) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @09:11PM (#34447052) Homepage Journal
    He is MY douchebag. He is the way i would want any douchebag to be like. I would share a flat with such a douchebag, at any given point.

    As far as douchebags go, there were a lot of douchebags among the people who have pioneered this age of democracy that the power elite has made null and void.

    Benjamin franklin used to strip naked and sit on a chair in the middle of a long corridor in his mansion, after opening the windows from both sides and ensuring that the corridor had good breeze.

    Thomas paine was SO aggressive in his crusade against religion that, he set up a church of reason, and started a new religion.

    i can go on and on.

    in the list that can be made out of quirkiness, oddness, douchebagness of those people who now we see as pioneers of freedom or fighters of democracy, assanges alleged 'douchebagness' wouldnt even qualify in the top 100.

    and it is as another poster had just commented: assange has done more than any western government did for freedom and democracy, since world war II.

    our governments do not want us to know things they have done. this was supposed to be a democracy, in which people were in power, as 'we the people'. we have become 'them the people', who are herded.

    wake up. wikileaks is what we have. assange and his team, are the ones doing it. support them. for your future and your children's.
    • by kimvette (919543) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:01AM (#34448892) Homepage Journal

      Barack Obama failed to keep his promise of delivering government transparency, just as he hasn't kept his other campaign promises. The way I see it, Wikileaks is holding the government accountable and is delivering on Obama's campaign promise. As a citizen of The united States of America I am glad to see someone run a site like Wikileaks because having this wealth of information available will help dissuade future would-be tyrants from trying to pull off what the douchebags in power have been doing as they pull the wool over our eyes.

      Also, isn't the timing of the charges against Assange pretty suspect? A leak was announced, warrants were put out for his arrest. The charges disappeared as the storm subsided. Another major leak was announced, and coincidentally newly released warrants were released. Please; I do not believe in coincidence.

      We need whistle blowers and we need this information out in the open so people will open their eyes and consider throwing out ALL of our elected officials, and choose candidates who believe that the Constitution means what it says, and that it's important for ALL to be held accountable - even^H^H^H^Hespecially the "elite" politicians and the corporate execs they're in bed with.

  • by Mysteray (713473) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @09:23PM (#34447112) Homepage

    http://lieberman.senate.gov/index.cfm/news-events/news/2010/12/amazon-severs-ties-with-wikileaks [senate.gov]

    "I call on any other company or organization that is hosting Wikileaks to immediately terminate its relationship with them. Wikileaks' illegal, outrageous, and reckless acts have compromised our national security and put lives at risk around the world."

    C.f. "There are times when we must all endure adjustment to the Constitution in the name of security."

    Coincidence? I think not! [twitpic.com]

  • by wallydallas (1483081) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @10:13PM (#34447466)
    I donated money via pay pal on Dec 3rd, the day wikileaks had their account cut off. Pay pal accounts are often put on a 180 day hold. I called paypal to verify my money is no longer held in paypal. They said they can say nothing about the issue. They would not even send that to me in writing. They would not give me a dispute number or any other tracking number for my unanswered question. The only comment they had was to contact the better business bureau. Anyone know a good laywer willing to call the pay pal legal department and find out where my donation is sitting?
  • by ugen (93902) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @10:17PM (#34447510)

    I think it is fairly obvious why wikileaks wants to use ssh/push method to mirror their data. They can't use polling because, frankly, with the way they are being pushed around and shut down all the time there is just no way to guarantee that any host, domain name or IP address they provide would be available for an extended period of time.

    Push method with a specific public/private key would allow them to push content from anywhere, as they are being chased and forced to change servers and providers.

    I thought it was obvious but may be worth clarifying.

    Btw, the main site seems to be down again.

  • by mykos (1627575) on Saturday December 04, 2010 @10:31PM (#34447638)
    Nice try, United States Government.

    Obi-Wan's last words apply here.
  • Julian Assangenitsyn (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Max_W (812974) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:00AM (#34448886)

    So you thought Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr_Solzhenitsyn [wikipedia.org] , Andrei Sakharov http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrei_Sakharov [wikipedia.org] and other Samizdat http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samizdat [wikipedia.org] authors were a joke. Gave them Nobel prizes. Now, when you have got your first real samizdat author, you know how it feels.

  • by naasking (94116) <naasking@g[ ]l.com ['mai' in gap]> on Sunday December 05, 2010 @03:13AM (#34448928) Homepage

    I expect a WikiLeaks download worm any day now. Some hacker somewhere is going to get so pissed off at the government's response to this, I expect a worm which downloads and seeds the WikiLeaks to every computer it can spread to. Any downloads on a computer can be claimed as having been downloaded by the virus. Perfect plausible deniability, and the WikiLeaks data will never die.

  • by chipwich (131556) on Sunday December 05, 2010 @08:07AM (#34449834)
    I know I'm preaching to the choir, here, but human-nature says that most people (even Slashdotters) are watching this unfold without realizing they can be a part of it.

    The WL episode is showing us that our own politicians would readily abandon core values of democracy in order to avoid embarrassment. It also clearly demonstrates that we live in a world where our personal communications can readily be disrupted at the whim of private corporations under pressure from these same politicians.

    Democracy can only thrive with the uninhibited exchange of communications between individuals. If you want to help ensure democracy, do any of the following:


    1) Run a TOR server ( http://www.torproject.org/ [torproject.org] ). This is software that helps provide freedom and privacy by encrypting and distributing network communications. If you don't want to run TOR on your machine, rent a Virtual Private Server (VPS) and do it on someone else's box.


    2) Support the EFF ( http://www.eff.org/ [eff.org] ). This organization understands technology and knows that in the digital age, information is power.


    3) Support open-source distributed alternatives to web-based software-as-a-service. EveryDNS, Paypal, Twitter, Amazon's EC2, and even our beloved Google are points of vulnerability in democracy since their fundamental obligation is to shareholders instead of to an innate code of ethics. How would you find information if Google bowed to Government pressure? The only thing that will ensure corporations stay in line is the existence of alternatives such as a distributed search engine (http://yacy.de/ ).


    4) Support open-source software by using it, contributing time or money to its development, and requesting that our Governments make policies to use it. The world would be a very different place if the power of public-key-encryption was kept solely in Government and Corporate hands. Only Free and Open Source Software ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_and_open_source_software [wikipedia.org] ) ensures that all members of society who use information technology are on the same footing.


    5) Let others know what is at stake, spread the word. Democracy takes active participation, and this takes patience and explanation so that nontechnical Constituents have the understanding that you possess.


    Our communications technology is only a tool and can be used to both facilitate democracy and better the world, or to enslave humankind. We are witnessing the first infowar of the digital age, and the powers that be will use it to push hard for bans on encryption, crackdown on peer-to-peer communication, and other information tools.

    Will you watch silently and let information technology turn into a tool of repression, or will you take a stand while you still can? The race is on, do something!
    • by chipwich (131556)
      btw, if you agree with the sentiments I expressed, please spread them beyond our geek-realm to the rest of the Interwebs...

      For example, you can upvote it here on reddit [reddit.com]

      or copy it wholesale, edit into oblivion, and post somewhere else. Let everyone realize that they can play a role in spreading digital Democracy.

Nothing is faster than the speed of light ... To prove this to yourself, try opening the refrigerator door before the light comes on.

Working...