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Facebook Messaging Blocks Links 143

Posted by timothy
from the deep-packets dept.
jhigh writes "With the launch of the new Facebook messaging system designed to encourage account holders to utilize Facebook for all of their messaging needs, one would think that Facebook would recognize that it cannot continue to block content that it disagrees with. However, Wired reports that Facebook messaging, like the rest of the social networking application, continues to block links to torrents and other file sharing sites, even when users are sending messages via their facebook.com email address. Say what you want about the morality of using file sharing services to share copyrighted material, if Facebook wishes to become a player in the email market, they cannot block content."
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Facebook Messaging Blocks Links

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  • Nope. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Gothic_Walrus (692125) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @02:33PM (#34292274) Journal

    if Facebook wishes to become a player in the email market, they cannot block content.

    "Messaging" and "e-mail" are not the same thing. Problem solved?

  • That's nothing (Score:4, Insightful)

    by gmack (197796) <gmack@@@innerfire...net> on Saturday November 20, 2010 @02:33PM (#34292276) Homepage Journal

    Blocking sites on copyright grounds is one thing but mis-declaring sites they have a personal beef with as the source of malicious installs is quite another.

  • Re:Demographics (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 20, 2010 @02:42PM (#34292330)

    I am more and more convinced that the type of people who are on Facebook, let alone those who actually will use messages, are not the types to know or be savvy enough for torrents and similar activities

    I agree. It is becoming clear that FaceBook IS INDEED the new AOL.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 20, 2010 @02:48PM (#34292374)

    "if Facebook wishes to become a player in the email market, they cannot block content"

    Do you honestly think most people care? If they cared about closed and controlled communications they wouldn't be using Facebook in the first place.

    This is something approximately 15 geeks care about, and of those, 14 are not even using Facebook. FB might or might not succeed, but censoring emails will not be a factor either way.

  • by Firehed (942385) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @02:54PM (#34292402) Homepage

    Good email systems *allow* you to block content. Big difference.

  • by Fractal Dice (696349) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @02:59PM (#34292422) Journal

    Facebook, you shall not cross this line! No this line. Not this line. Wait ... ok, now don't cross this line.

    Sorry, but I have a hard time seeing complaints about facebook as credible any more - surely by this point they've already driven away everyone who really cares about these sorts of things.

  • by Cougar Town (1669754) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @03:03PM (#34292444)

    Online forums and chats have been blocking URLs for years. People simply get around it by changing characters, breaking the URL up with spaces, or other things. Each system of blocking always has some way to get around it that's quite easy for a human to still understand, even non-tech people. I don't like them doing this either, but it's never been a real problem for anyone who actually wants to pass a URL along on other sites.

  • by Sepodati (746220) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @03:05PM (#34292460) Homepage

    Facebook isn't under any kind of obligation to link to your torrent, legal or not. If you have legal content, you can link to your own SITE where users can find torrents for your content. This leaves the question of legality on you instead of Facebook. Honestly, I'd want that one level of separation if I was running a business, also.

  • Use bit.ly (Score:3, Insightful)

    by genealotech (1854354) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @03:12PM (#34292480)
    If you have a link that gets blocked by Facebook, convert the link to a bit.ly link. Then it will work.
  • by Sepodati (746220) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @03:13PM (#34292488) Homepage

    Oh, and if your SITE primarily provides illegal (in the US) access to copyrighted files, I'd block links to that, also.

    These people that think the Internet is lawless to US citizens and they can do whatever they want because they're not "depriving anyone of anything" need to come back to reality. Get copyright law removed and then I'll defend you, but otherwise you're breaking the law.

  • by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @03:22PM (#34292540)

    Sorry, but I have a hard time seeing complaints about facebook as credible any more - surely by this point they've already driven away everyone who really cares about these sorts of things.

    That's like saying that the people bitching about the TSA's hobsian choice between nudie photos or a rub-and-tug have no credibility because the TSA's been ratcheting up the crazy for almost a decade now and if they aren't taking the train they deserve what they get. Because of the network effect, facebook is the only practical game in town for a lot of people who want that kind of service.

  • by umask077 (122989) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @03:53PM (#34292726)

    So I worked many years ago for a USENet provider. We of course carried all groups. Everyone knew what was in USENet ad suffice to say discussion about what to do about things like the kiddie porn came up. The decision was made to shut down those groups. I mean it make's sense. Cut off access to those groups and stem the flow somewhat. Within 2 days of shutting the groups down we received a call from the FBI threatening to shut us down. They said by censoring anything we become responsible for ALL content on our systems.

    It seems to me that Facebook should be held to the same rules. If they censor one thing they must censor it all

    Now on a positive note the USENet providers legal department found out that what really happened was that we shut down and FBI sting. Once we knew that we were able to facilitate their investigation but still. The common carrier laws should apply to everyone or no one. If I have a vote, it's everyone.

  • by MaskedSlacker (911878) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:01PM (#34292792)

    The mistake you make is thinking that the GP wants to keep in touch with people like you.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:03PM (#34292812)

    From the lawyers-happy groups known as RIAA and MPAA.

  • You must be joking (Score:3, Insightful)

    by turkeyfish (950384) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:09PM (#34292836)

    The entire Facebook and social networking business model is about penning users into a coral and preying upon their personal information for its marketing potential. Anyone who buys into the technology must is basically signing on to be fleeced as companies like Facebook, Myspace, etc. fleece them for what they are worth.

    Facebook is the internet on training wheels, for those who need the assist.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:10PM (#34292842)

    a hyperlink is breaking the law? go fuck yourself.

  • Re:Demographics (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:15PM (#34292862)

    I am more and more convinced that the type of people who are on Facebook, let alone those who actually will use messages, are not the types to know or be savvy enough for torrents and similar activities

    if you want to communicate with your relatives and certain friends, you end up with a Facebook and/or Twitter account, regardless of how "savvy" you are.

    Funny, about 10 years ago the same thing was being said about AOL/Instant Messenger accounts.

  • Re:Demographics (Score:2, Insightful)

    by DarkKnightRadick (268025) <the_spoon.geo@yahoo.com> on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:20PM (#34292888) Homepage Journal

    that wouldn't be surprising since your FB login is based upon your email address.

  • Re:Nope. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by LordLimecat (1103839) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:43PM (#34293038)
    More to the point, if people dont really care about those features, facebook can do whatever it wants. When it goes too far, it will become clear to them pretty quickly.
  • by LordLimecat (1103839) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:45PM (#34293052)

    Facebook is the internet on training wheels, for those who need the assist.

    Apparently it hasnt occured to you that some people actually find it USEFUL for keeping up with a large number of contacts.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 20, 2010 @04:50PM (#34293094)

    That's the most retarded fucking bit of illogic I've seen in weeks. Let's take a few more steps down this same line of thinking:

    a) A site that contains no illegally hosted copyrighted material, yet that contains an index to the locations of both copyrighted and uncopyrighted material is illegal in your eyes.

    b) Therefore, google is illegal as it is just such a site.

    c) Internet connections are illegal as they give you access to google

    d) Computers are illegal as they give you access to the Internet

    e) Computer shops are illegal as they give you access to computers

    f) Roads are illegal as they give you access to computer shops

    g) Cars are illegal as they give you access to roads

    Need I go on? This isn't obtuse - this is just the practical application of your retarded stance.

  • Centralization (Score:4, Insightful)

    by sulfur (1008327) on Saturday November 20, 2010 @05:19PM (#34293238)
    I remember when people were concerned about their privacy and complained about Gmail mining their emails. Facebook will take it to a whole new level, complete with value-added features such as censorship. People have to understand that decentralization is the only way to go; putting all your eggs in one basket (facebook) will never lead to anything good.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 20, 2010 @06:24PM (#34293598)

    Actually I think he is saying it's the internet with training wheels (including contact management). If you're a big boy there are plenty of other ways to manage contacts that don't lock you in and misuse your data and your contacts data.

  • by guruevi (827432) <evi@@@smokingcube...be> on Saturday November 20, 2010 @06:56PM (#34293876) Homepage

    An address book with a decent search engine works just as well. To keep in contact send them an e-mail. No need to outsource this to some company that may or may not abuse the information that is in their proprietary e-mail system.

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