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Film Industry Hires Cyber Hitmen To Take Down Pirates 457

Posted by samzenpus
from the roll-for-initiative dept.
thelostagency writes "Girish Kumar, managing director of Aiplex Software says his company is being hired by the film industry to attack online pirates. He says if a provider did not do anything to remove the link or content hosted on its site, his company would launch what is known as a denial-of-service (DoS) attack on the offending computer server. From the article: 'Kumar said that at the moment most of the payment for his company's services came from the film industry in India. "We are tied up with more than 30 companies in Bollywood. They are the major production houses." As for Hollywood films, he said they, too, used his services.'"
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Film Industry Hires Cyber Hitmen To Take Down Pirates

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  • Er, (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:30AM (#33517100)

    Aren't DoS attacks illegal? If so, why not?

    • Re:Er, (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Zaphod The 42nd (1205578) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @01:13AM (#33517338)
      This was my first thought too. This should be HIGHLY illegal. This is vigilantism, plain and simple, and is completely illegal and immoral.
      • RTFA (Score:5, Insightful)

        by mcgrew (92797) * on Thursday September 09, 2010 @08:46AM (#33519582) Homepage Journal

        1. TFA says that if they shut down an Austrailian site, they're in deep poodoo.

        2. The DMCA only applies in the US. Nobody else has to worry about it

        3. I see DDoS war on the horizon. How long until Aiplex Software is knocked off the internet? I'm betting it won't be long.

        4. I'm also betting that NOBODY from the US film industry will spend a minute in jail over their blatantly illegal activities. In the US, if you have enough money you're above the law. A rich, powerful man only goes to prison if a richer, more powerful man wants him there.

    • Re:Er, (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Fluffeh (1273756) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @01:14AM (#33517342)

      Aren't DoS attacks illegal? If so, why not?

      They are, and I really wonder if Hollywood (FTFA: "As for Hollywood films, he said they, too, used his services.") wants to really be poking ANOTHER stick into the hornets nest that the internet can be.

      The way I see if, for every hundred thousand cookie cutter P2P users, there will be one who is savvy enough, annoyed enough and has the resources to return in kind to Hollywood. And there will be people like me, who don't fit in either bracket, but would certainly offer both refuge to that one person and buy them drinks for their efforts.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Sinesurfer (40786)

      So.... does the EFF sue Aiplex, the MPAA or the film owner?

      (that's assuming Aiplex is careful not to upset hackers smarter than Aiplex). Do not DDOS Aiplex and if you're caught remember I told you not to do it.

  • Really? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by telekon (185072) <canweriotnow@gCOMMAmail.com minus punct> on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:30AM (#33517102) Homepage Journal
    If DDOS attacks are suddenly legal, there are a fuckton of servers I want to point at the MPAA right now.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by dwywit (1109409)
      I suspect a certain software company - sort of rhymes with "complex" - might find its own servers suddenly subjected to the same treatment.
    • Re:Really? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by DigiShaman (671371) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:58AM (#33517250) Homepage

      Here's a though. If computers are going to get infected anyways and turned into SPAM spewing zombies, why not modify the virus to host P2P trackers along with it? Let the blackhats and MPAA roll around in the mud and take care of our vexing problem for us =) It would kill two birds with one stone. The SPAM goes away and the MPAA gets busted as an accessory to the crime. If they don't, they still keep taking down the SPAMMERS. Win WIN!!!!!

    • Re:Really? (Score:5, Funny)

      by seeker_1us (1203072) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @01:02AM (#33517274)
      Is that an English or Metric fuckton?
      • Re:Really? (Score:5, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, 2010 @02:29AM (#33517662)

        Damn, and here I was measuring these things in sh*tloads, now I have to rescale them to fucktons? And to think, it all started as only a few dangstroms wide.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by koiransuklaa (1502579)

          There's good reason behind moving to fucktons. The relative ambiguity of shitloads made life difficult for everyone: Are we talking imperial shitloads, naval shitloads, long shitloads, short shitloads... measuring loads of crap used to require an expert, now anyone can do it!

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Thanshin (1188877)

        Is that an English or Metric fuckton?

        Metric.

        The imperial equivalency is: 1 metric fuckton = 2204 fuckpounds

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by xorsyst (1279232)

        Dude, we use metric measurements in England :)

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by dkf (304284)

        Is that an English or Metric fuckton?

        It must be a Statute fuckton, as a Metric one would be written "fucktonne".

    • My guess is that it's legal if you have enough lawyers and lobbyists to whitewash it.

    • Re:Really? (Score:5, Informative)

      by ultranova (717540) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @02:02AM (#33517556)

      If DDOS attacks are suddenly legal, there are a fuckton of servers I want to point at the MPAA right now.

      They aren't legal for mere mortal serfs like you. They are legal for the nobility by virtue of their divine property rights. Learn your place and bow to your masters.

    • by zdzichu (100333)

      They are in third world, like in India.

  • by mirix (1649853) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:31AM (#33517108)

    In other news, I've decided I'm going to start shooting out the tires of cars that I witness passing on the right.

    or should I be going after Ford?

    • No fucking kidding. Why isn't a request being made to Interpol to have this guy and his company dragged in to face American justice for violating anti-tampering laws?

      Oh that's right, it's for Big Media. Whatever they do is perfectly fine.

      • by bloodhawk (813939)
        not that I condone what this idiotic company is doing. But how exactly would you manage to get an extradition for him on the basis of crimes commited in another country (where what he is doing isn't illegal), unless you can somehow show the pirates he attacked are on American soil, even then I doubt it would hold up.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by digitallife (805599)

          Just ask Canada to extradite him... They've never refused an extradition request from the US. They'll probably even get him out of another country just to extradite him.

        • by exomondo (1725132) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @01:00AM (#33517264)

          not that I condone what this idiotic company is doing. But how exactly would you manage to get an extradition for him on the basis of crimes commited in another country (where what he is doing isn't illegal), unless you can somehow show the pirates he attacked are on American soil, even then I doubt it would hold up.

          IANAL but surely the american companies hiring his company would be somewhat accountable wouldn't they?

          • Do you have any evidence that any US companies have actually hired him to do DOS attacks?

            • by exomondo (1725132) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @02:29AM (#33517658)

              Do you have any evidence that any US companies have actually hired him to do DOS attacks?

              FTFA:

              As for Hollywood films, he said they, too, used his services.

              "We are tied up with Fox STAR Studios - Star TV and 20th Century Fox - who are a joint venture company in India."

              Fox Star is of course owned by News Corp. But by all means take my above comment as a hypothetical if you prefer.

        • by jvillain (546827)

          That isn't true. If the packets cross though American controlled territory any where they are violating American laws. And America makes sure as much traffic as possible crosses their territory in order to be able to tap it.

          • by exomondo (1725132) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @01:25AM (#33517406)

            That isn't true. If the packets cross though American controlled territory any where they are violating American laws. And America makes sure as much traffic as possible crosses their territory in order to be able to tap it.

            Do you have a source for that? Wouldn't that mean that if you were to do something illegal then you would be charged in every country that your traffic was routed through?

    • by X0563511 (793323)

      Which is great, because most places I've lived that's entirely legal and never seems to cause a problem.

      The only time it wouldn't is should you randomly decide to shift right without LOOKING first.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by XanC (644172)

        Exactly correct. If anything along those lines should be illegal, it would be BEING PASSED on the right. If you're being passed on the right, move to the right!

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by lgw (121541)

          If you're being passed on the right, move to the right!

          Ahh, Boston driving! Better advice would be "after being passed on the right, move to the right!".

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by 0111 1110 (518466)

      In other news, I've decided I'm going to start shooting out the tires of cars that I witness passing on the right.

      You do realize that the left lane is supposed to be the passing lane. That means if you want to drive like a little old lady you are supposed to do it in the right lane. I wish we could shoot out the tires of every person who deems it his god given right to drive at half the speed limit in the left lane, just chugging along while creating massive and dangerous traffic problems behind him. Actually, to be honest, I wouldn't aim for the tires. Slow drivers need to be taken out of the gene pool. Particularly t

  • So like (Score:5, Interesting)

    by adversus (1451933) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:32AM (#33517110)
    21st century version of a protection racket? "Do what we say or we'll beat your connections down."
    • Re:So like (Score:4, Informative)

      by Kjella (173770) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:49AM (#33517202) Homepage

      I think this article should be published far and wide, it's anti-product placement for the MAFIAA. Stop denial of service attacks on the Internet, abolish copyright today. Do not support organized crime, boycott MPAA today.

    • by Nursie (632944)

      Not just that but unless India has a law going by the name DMCA, he's using US law, from a base in India to warn sites that could be anywhere else to remove their material, then DoSing them.

      It's not just bad, wrong and (in some jurisdictions) criminal, it's fscking nuts!

  • by MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:35AM (#33517124)

    Let's see a graph of how their earnings went up during the attack.

  • by spyder-implee (864295) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:40AM (#33517160)
    Pissing on a bonfire...
  • by jafo (11982) * on Thursday September 09, 2010 @12:50AM (#33517206) Homepage
    Because DoS attacks never harm innocent bystanders like the ISP, *THEIR* ISP, or other customers of either of them.

    We have enough problems with DoS attacks launched by miscreants. So, yeah, maybe some of these ISPs don't take reports seriously, but I do know that not all "copyright enforcement" type actions are well researched...

    This one time we got a DMCA takedown notice from a software vendor in Australia for a site run by a department of a local university, for running an unlicensed copy of their software. The DMCA takedown notice was sent to my company because they "couldn't find the contact information" *FOR A UNIVERSITY*. I found it by clicking on the "contact" link on the page they made the takedown request for.

    Turns out that the university *DID* have a license for the software, BTW.

    I know it's annoying when your stuff gets stolen, but don't go attacking people.
    • by jvillain (546827)

      I can see the ISP's breaking out the law suites here. They have been looking for some pay back for the *AA and this just might be their ticket.

    • by mjwx (966435)

      I know it's annoying when your stuff gets stolen, but don't go attacking people.

      Yes it is annoying when someone physically removes my stuff so I am deprived of that stuff.

    • No kidding (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @02:16AM (#33517604)

      All I've got to say is if we see this on our (a university) network, we will go after them. Conveniently we've got a company name now and them admitting who hired them. I'll be looking up some IPs and adding them to our network monitors. If these guys decide to DoS our network, we'll get the logs and turn it over to the lawyers and the police.

      • Re:No kidding (Score:5, Insightful)

        by mayberry42 (1604077) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @04:25AM (#33518156)

        I think most will, but to be honest this sounds more like a desperate call for free press to me. I mean, c'mon a guy basically goes out of his way to say "hey, they've hired us to take down torrent sites, and guess what? we're awesome at what we do!" Sounds fishy to me. Then, of course, there are the legal issues:

        At time, we have to go an extra mile and attack the site and destroy the data to stop the movie from circulating any further

        So, not only does he plan on launching a DoS attack, but he also plans on destroying the data? Sorry, even governments investigating CP won't do that, let alone some small private company.

        Now let's assume, however, that he's telling the truth. Would major motion studios actually be that stupid (jokes aside) to give him discretion to bring up their names? He brings them up as if it were nothing.

        Sorry, but this is all too much for me - let me be the one to call bullshit on this article and to the author who fell for it bait, line and sinker

  • by pavera (320634) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @01:22AM (#33517384) Homepage Journal

    Pretty sure DoS attacks have landed many a hacker with extraordinarily long prison sentences... So when are we raiding the corporate HQs of the hollywood studios?!?

  • My websites generally sit on shared servers. What if a different customer on the same server as my sites hosts something subject one of these DDoS attacks? Answer: I'm boned!! Yeh great idea geniuses! Like others, if these sort of attacks are now legal, then I've got my hitlist ready to go.
  • by Haedrian (1676506) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @01:39AM (#33517474)

    DDOS attacks require a ton of people to properly work. Torrents sites are going to have a very large bandwidth and the ability to service many clients at the same time. So he's probably going to need more than one company to do it.

    Secondly, if they're all in the same company, chances are they have a similar IP range - which means that any admin worth his salt can disconnect them from the network.

    Of course, if they use a botnet, to do so - which is probably the only plausable way - they're going to be breaking quite a few international laws - and get sued into oblivion.

    So yeah, I think this is going to end up in tears.

    • by snookums (48954)

      Actually, TFA implies that it's not a DDoS, but some other kind(s) of DoS being used. Perhaps something like Slowloris [wikipedia.org], or exploiting other unreleased server vulnerabilities.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, 2010 @02:40AM (#33517716)

    Five minutes on Google, and they already look like tools. They're amateur spammers, too. I find it hard to believe anyone hired them for anything. Why don't you have a look yourself, and if you wish, tell these utter clowns what you think about their business methods?

    +91 95386 66666
    +91 98451 28280
    karan@aiplex.com
    rajani@aiplex.com
    girish@aiplex.com
    mahesh_r_blr@hotmail.com
    +91 80 2503 5411
    www.onlineantimoviepiracy.com
    www.reportmoviepiracy.com

    Aiplex Founded in 2003 provides net Vigilance services & is a leading provider of Windows-based Network Vulnerability & security Solutions that enable corporations to safely conduct business operations via Internet. The following are the solutions rendered to various clients across the globe.
    a)Search engine optimization
    b)Medical Transcription services
    c)Email marketing / e-campaign
    d)Business solution & Statistical Analysis
    e)Net Vigilance (The complete corporate / Media security for copyright contents)

    Net Vigilance
    We are proud to claim that we are the only Net vigilant company in the Globe thus far to provide unprecedented services on Internet based piracies. To eradicate piracy at its best possible, we strategically follow some of the best practices outlined below;
    a)Finding the links of the unauthorized content using appropriate software which co-relates the copy right / licensed material in any given format.
    b)A detailed statistical analysis of the site which has such pirated content would be made available on a weekly/fortnight basis - they are so called the very enemies to the creator.
    c)Our 24/7 net vigilant agents & customer support team will have a rigorous check on video sharing communities and do regular check ups for copy right deviation.
    d)We shall approach the service provider with the authenticated links of the unscrupulous pirated products being uploaded & appeal them to remove the content/file by sending legal notice / request letter for violation of copyrights.
    e)Our 24/7-support team would also prevent the damage by sending instant legal notices to the service provider & block the account for deviating copyright laws.

    Techniques used in identifying & preventing the copyright damage
    a)We shall promote various articles in leading forums & reiterate the pros & cons of copy right deviation.
    b)Creating accounts in popular social network communities and inviting people to contribute in locating the unscrupulous videos or duplication of an original recording for commercial gain without the consent of owners.
    c)Conducting torrent search with torrent Meta sites using software.
    d)Conducting music search with music meta sites
    e)Conducting video search with video spotters and video sharing meta search engines
    f)We can prevent by sending a strict warning notice/legal notice to certain service provider who invite their clients to upload videos & movies for the benefit of having more traffic to their site.
    g)We can provide the copyright infringement articles which helps the company to promote and update their method of protection against the piracy.
    h)We will seek advice from various technology forums that are implemented which could help the copyright content owners to protect their material against piracy.

    Aiplex Net Vigilance strength lies in DATA BASE
    We have a huge database of popular forums, search engines, torrents, video sharing communities, blogs & social networking communities which can be used to reduce the rate of piracy growth in Bollywood.
    a)We have a list of 14500 leading torrents where movies are uploaded currently.
    b) A list of 97 leading movie uploading sites where people are allowed to upload more than 1GB single file is available with us.
    c)A mega list of 40000 plus forums where general discussion are made will have high impact while we invite aspirants to share views or locate the pirated content on web will surely reduce piracy.
    d)A list of leading 159 video sharing communities

  • by Crypto Gnome (651401) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @03:06AM (#33517840) Homepage Journal
    The Music and Movie industry will (one day) regret that they instigated a never ending escalating arms race against *everyone*.

    It is a bad business model to go out of your way to piss off *the entire known universe*.

    One day somebody with enough brains and too much anger will trump your sorry ass and you will take *years* to recover (even slightly) from the mountain of suffering that will be unleashed against you.

    Have these people forgotten Nagasaki and Hiroshima? EVENTUALLY somebody says "STFU or I *will* make you regret it".
  • by BangaIorean (1848966) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @03:37AM (#33517958)
    This kind of business should have been kept completely hush-hush and shady by this Aiplex company. Going public with this stuff essentially defeats the purpose.
  • by He who knows (1376995) on Thursday September 09, 2010 @08:05AM (#33519270)
    How can an Indian company try to use the DMCA laws that only aply in America (at the moment) to try to force websites that probally are not based in America to remove copyrighted material belonging to mainly film companies based in India.
  • by Minwee (522556) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Thursday September 09, 2010 @06:36PM (#33528364) Homepage

    As I recall it, the standard sentence for a "denial of service" attack is four years in jail and paying $900,000 to the City of San Francisco. And even if they are located in Finland, Sweden or Bangalore it shouldn't be that hard to send the local police raid them to enforce US laws against foreigners living abroad.

    So when are we going to see some action on this?

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