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Crime The Courts

Ringleader of RBS WorldPay Heist Faces Charges in US 52

Posted by kdawson
from the many-mules-make-light-work dept.
Late in 2008, the most sophisticated and well-coordinated international e-crime yet pulled off netted $9 million for its perpetrators. We discussed the RBS WorldPay heist when news about it emerged, and the indictments some months later. Now one of the accused ringleaders has been extradited from Estonia to face charges in the US. "...in the span of 12 hours around Nov. 8 [2008], the group hit 2,100 ATM terminals in 280 cities spanning the world, from the United States to Russia to Italy to Japan. ... Despite the technical and international challenges of the case, US investigators believe they were able to trace the scheme back to its origin. On Friday they brought one of the accused ringleaders from Estonia to Atlanta to face arraignment on several fraud charges — a rare appearance in US courts for an accused international hacker. Sergei Tsurikov, 26, of Tallinn, Estonia, pleaded not guilty at his arraignment to conspiracy to commit computer fraud, computer fraud, conspiracy to commit wire fraud, wire fraud and aggravated identity theft. ... The increasing scope of foreign attacks comes as college students around the world are focusing heavily on technology degrees only to emerge into a difficult job market with low pay, officials said."
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Ringleader of RBS WorldPay Heist Faces Charges in US

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  • WorldPlay? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday August 07, 2010 @08:26PM (#33177006)

    Isn't it World Pay?

  • USA World police (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Aint it cool how we can go grab someone from another country and force him to stand trial using our laws and rules.

    Oh wait.. no... it's that other thing.... pretty stupid.

    How long until some guy gets dragged into muslim land to stand trial for something their laws say. Well maybe not muslim land. we hate those guys... but what about someplace like china..
    They have the pull to get the other countrys to dance to their tune.

    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Aint it cool how we can go grab someone from another country and force him to stand trial using our laws and rules.

      I hope they come get you for stupidity.

    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Uh.. the guy allegedly committed crimes and hit ATMs in the United States. That is breaking US laws, so they do have jurisdiction and standing.

      Why shouldn't he have to answer the US government for that?

      Yeah I thought so.

      • by B4light (1144317)
        Because he's not in the US anymore
        • Apologies if you were actually being sarcastic or something, but... if someone kills you, and hops a plane to say, Portugal, they should get away with killing you, because they're not in the US any more?

          Crimes committed over the internet, or a country claiming its laws were violated by someone who was never within their borders is a different matter, but if ATMs in the US were hit, this seems like a pretty clear case of "broke the law, get held responsible."

          • Why should the US get dibs on him?

            ATM's in many countries were involved.

            Do they have any less right to prosecute him?

            Or is this just one of those "AMERICA NUMBER ONE!!! WOOO!" pieces of bullshit where you automatically assume your countries whims are more important than all others?

            • by KDR_11k (778916)

              Nah, we'll let you pay for jailing the dude. Plus our human rights are stronger than yours so he'll have a worse time in your jails.

            • Or is this just one of those "AMERICA NUMBER ONE!!! WOOO!" pieces of bullshit where you automatically assume your countries whims are more important than all others?

              I'm Canadian, you fuckhead. But nice try.

              Why should the US get dibs on him?

              I'm guessing they get dibs because they either asked first, or had the strongest case amongst those asking.

      • The GUY has probably never been in the USA before now. HE didn't hit any ATMs in the US at all. In fact, from my understanding, he didn't hit any ATMs at all anywhere. What he did was figure out how to fool the world pay system, and distributed that information to third parties for a cut of their take.
    • by hldn (1085833) on Saturday August 07, 2010 @08:55PM (#33177190) Homepage

      do you know how extradition works? we didn't "go grab him." we ask another government if they'd kindly send someone over here as we have an issue to discuss with the person.

      perhaps he should have moved to a country that doesn't have an extradition treaty with the united states. (estonia has since 1935.)

      • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        perhaps he should have moved to a country that doesn't have an extradition treaty with the united states. (estonia has since 1935.)

        It should maybe be clarified that, although Estonia has had an extradition treaty with the US since 1935, it hasn't been effective for most of that time.

        For most of the time the treaty has been in place, Estonia was under the rule of the Soviets, and I suspect that there would have been no chance of getting someone extradited during that time. It was only from 1934 until late 1939 and then from 1991 that it was likely to happen.

        However, your point stands as a good one, a smart Estonian would probably have s

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        Yemen doesn't have an extradition treaty with the United States. In fact, extradition is prohibited in the Yemeni Constitution.

        Wat do? Ask president Ali Abdullah Saleh if we can go into Yemen and kill the bad guys ourselves. [go.com]
  • 9mil? Pah, the guy won't even get an interview for a mail room gig at Goldman Sachs. 9 mil, what a joke.
    • by erichill (583191)
      I, too, find $9 million to be pretty unimpressive given the supposed potential in this kind of crime. It sounds to me like the system worked pretty well.
  • They shipped him from Estonia to Atlanta? Poor guy. No crime is worth going to Atlanta.

  • by devnullkac (223246) on Saturday August 07, 2010 @09:44PM (#33177388) Homepage

    Have you got anything without fraud?

    Well, there's fraud, egg, sausage, and fraud; that's not got much fraud in it.

    I don't want ANY fraud!

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Late in 2008, the most sophisticated and well-coordinated international e-crime yet pulled off netted $9 million for its perpetrators.

    I thought the banking bailout was for billions?

  • Ahem... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by pedantic bore (740196) on Saturday August 07, 2010 @10:00PM (#33177474)

    Late in 2008, the most sophisticated and well-coordinated international e-crime yet pulled off netted $9 million for its perpetrators.

    It's the "most sophisticated and well-coordinated" one you know about, anyway....

    Not so sophisticated and well-coordinated that it remained a secret, or that the ringleader didn't get caught, apparently.

    • by shermo (1284310)

      I'm surprised (and slightly disappointed) the most sophisticated e-crime only netted $9 million.

      Dr. Evil: "Here's the plan. We get the warhead, and we hold the world ransomed for.....Nine MILLION DOLLARS!!"
      No.2: "Ahem...Well, don't you think we should maybe ask for *more* than Nine million dollars? Nine million dollars isn't exactly a lot of money these days. Virtucon alone makes over nine billion dollars a year!"
      Dr. Evil: "Really?"
      No.2: "Mm-hmm."
      Dr. Evil: "That's a number. Okay then. We hold the world rans

  • "The increasing scope of foreign attacks comes as college students around the world are focusing heavily on technology degrees only to emerge into a difficult job market with low pay, officials said."

    If you're coming out of college right now with a degree in some form Information or Computer security, then that's probably not going to be the case. From what I've heard, job placement for graduates at my university is pretty good.

    • by rtb61 (674572)

      Catch is in a tough job market, trust takes precedence over qualifications. Especially when you start squeezing down salaries of your computer IT staff. Stories like this will ramp up the fear factor, any hint of untrustworthiness will make successful job applications pretty hard especially in an interconnected world.

      The other big thing of course, 'identity theft' (the credit card company lie for defrauding the accepted the false identity), ain't no such thing as identity theft in the cash economy, apart

  • They hit 2,100 ATM terminals in 280 cites and only cleared $9 million? Presumably they needed at least several hundred people for this. So each guy's take is a few thousand. The bosses maybe get half. And even if they hadn't got caught, they couldn't expect to be able to go back for a second taste.

    I wouldn't say no to a few million profit, but it seems a very small return for compromising so many banks. Might have been better to have sold the method to the banks.

I'd rather just believe that it's done by little elves running around.

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