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Tech Specs Leaked For French Spyware 212

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i-see-what-you-did-there dept.
An anonymous reader writes "With the 'three strikes' law now in effect in France, the organization tasked with implementing it, Hadopi, has been working on technology specs for making the process work — and those specs have now leaked. It appears to involve client-side monitoring and controlling software, that would try to watch what you were doing online, and even warn you before you used any P2P protocol (must make Skype phone calls fun). It's hard to believe people will accept this kind of thing being installed on their computers, so I can't wait to see how Hadopi moves forward with it. It also appears to violate EU rules on privacy."
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Tech Specs Leaked For French Spyware

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  • Not to worry (Score:5, Insightful)

    by elrous0 (869638) * on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:11PM (#33151094)
    The government pinky-promised that they won't use this for anything other than enforcing this law. And you have their *word* on that.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:13PM (#33151116)

    What are they going to do? Fucking outlaw Mac OS X, Linux and all the other non-Microsoft operating systems?

    Funny fact: in french it's called système d'exploitation. Maybe that's why they want such software. To exploit you and your computer.

  • Re:Woot (Score:5, Insightful)

    by kipd (1593207) on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:19PM (#33151176)
    They came first for the Windows-users, and I didn't speak up because I didn't use Windows...
  • Re:Not to worry (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mlts (1038732) * on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:19PM (#33151180)

    Just wait until the blackhats get ahold of this and change the phone home site from the standard to the blackhat's servers. Voila, instant botnet that is illegal for a French citizen to remove. I'm sure the guys on Elbonia are just drooling over that they can do once they can poison an ISP's DNS to get command/control access to the machines.

  • FrenchGeek (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:21PM (#33151204)

    Can't wait to see the French Gov. forcing me to install this kind of software on my computer.
    VPN is still safe for now I guess ...

    They will have to enforce this law on any computer entering the country, I can see lines forming at the customs where a Gov official will install something on tourists computers.

    The French government has better things to do than trying to regulate the internet...

    Hadopi will fail because it is already obsolete, what a fucking good way to waste tax payers money...

  • P2P isn't illegal (Score:0, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:21PM (#33151216)

    The act of using peer to peer software isn't illegal. Downloading content with peer to peer software isn't illegal. Downloading copyrighted content with *ANY* software will infringe someones copyright. Driving cars should be as illegal as using p2p software, since both can be abused! Cars are still on the road though. Pedestrians are killed and cars are still on the road. P2P is used to distribute software (some of it legal, some of it illegal), lets quit throwing out the baby with the bathwater.

  • by Dyinobal (1427207) on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:24PM (#33151258)
    Looking over the spec I can't honestly think that the French are dumb enough to think something like this could work, the scope is to broad, and software solutions are silly easy to bypass.
  • by bugs2squash (1132591) on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:26PM (#33151300)
    The whole suggestion of enforcing this client-side is so idiotic that I'm inclined to believe that there will be ISP-side enforcement and that in fact the client is only there to warn the user.
  • Re:Woot (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:29PM (#33151332)

    Oh, nice! Can I have the Linux version?

    No, Linux is now illegal because it can't be monitored by this software.

  • Re:Not to worry (Score:3, Insightful)

    by HungryHobo (1314109) on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:31PM (#33151350)

    The internet seems to be going down the shitter now that all the politicians kids are using it and those in power have started thinking internet==facebook.

    So what's the next communication medium that the government has so little understanding of that they don't even think about regulating it?

    Darknets are halfway there but they'll probably be outlawed in a few years.

  • Re:Woot (Score:3, Insightful)

    by cpghost (719344) on Thursday August 05, 2010 @12:44PM (#33151522) Homepage
    Which one do you prefer? qt-hadopi, gtk-hadopi, ... or just that plain old fashioned nvidia/ati binary blob driver for your graphics adapter?
  • We Joke, but... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by carp3_noct3m (1185697) <slashdot@warrior s - s h ade.net> on Thursday August 05, 2010 @01:28PM (#33152004)

    You know we around /. like to joke about things like encryption and the year of the linux desktop, but the more intrusive governments get, the more I see the internet as a whole routing around this damage and increasing both the use of *nix based systems and encryption. Imagine facebook levels of popularity but with encryption, privacy, and control as primary factors of computing for the masses. Because, in the end, its either that or we might as well just start walking around naked because we have "nothing to hide".

  • by John Hasler (414242) on Thursday August 05, 2010 @02:07PM (#33152528) Homepage

    > So much for liberté... we still have egalité and fraternité (until further notice)

    Unless you are Roma.

  • Re:Not to worry (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Buddy027 (1850014) on Thursday August 05, 2010 @02:08PM (#33152538)
    Why change it? Just add their own URL. It can still phone home so it looks like it still works. Even sending in false data.
  • by John Hasler (414242) on Thursday August 05, 2010 @02:19PM (#33152748) Homepage

    If encryption approached "Facebook levels of popularity", governments who want to monitor your traffic will simply make encryption illegal.

    If encryption approached "Facebook levels of popularity" it would be far too late for most governments to outlaw it.

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