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HP and Yahoo To Spam Your Printer 397

Posted by samzenpus
from the this-expense-report-brought-to-you-by... dept.
An anonymous reader writes "As many suspected when HP announced its web-connected printer, it didn't take long for the company to announce it will send 'targeted' advertisements to your new printer. So you'll get spammed, and you'll pay for the ink to print it. On the bright side, the FCC forbids unsolicited fax ads, so this will probably get HP on a collision course with the Feds."
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HP and Yahoo To Spam Your Printer

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:37PM (#32598104)

    ...is a coupon for ink.

    • by BrokenHalo (565198) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:37PM (#32598530)
      One of the main reasons I no longer use HP printers is their irritating tendency to spit out a test page every time you turn them on or look at them sideways. That can get through a lot of ink...
    • by Angst Badger (8636) on Thursday June 17, 2010 @01:01AM (#32599148)

      The first planned spam is a coupon for ink.

      And not just any coupon for ink. It'll be an 8x10 solid black rectangle -- overprinted with cyan, magenta, and yellow, of course -- with a tiny paragraph in white letters praising the deep, rich blacks the printer is capable of producing. To get to the actual coupon, which will be on the second page, you'll have to buy fresh ink cartridges so the document can finish printing. Naturally, the coupon will also be small and composed of white text on another 8x10 overprinted black rectangle, along with a second promotional message extolling the printer's ability to reliably churn out image after image.

      If anyone from the HP marketing department is reading this, I'm available for any openings you might have. Just give me the address of your web-accessible printer, and I'll send you my resume. In eight inch high Helvetica UltraBlack, one letter per page. As a token of my sincerity. You'd better include a fax number, too, just in case you run out of ink.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:37PM (#32598110)

    I'm sure HP will do their best job to protect the access to these web-based printers. It will take an entire week for the spammers to get HP's database and start sending ads to your printers.

    Also: The article is unclear, but it doesn't sound like HP will just send random print jobs with ads to your printer. It sounds more like *if* you setup the feature to print your newspaper every morning, the ads in the paper will change to be targeted. That is why they can claim "What we discovered is that people were not bothered by it [an advertisement]..." If they truly are sending advertising jobs to the printer unsolicited, then I think that quote is going to turn out to be the dumbest thing said on planet earth for at least the last few years. People would just love to find their already exorbitantly priced ink wasted on an ad.

    Lastly: Who would want to print their newspaper in the morning? Physical newspapers are convenient because of their wide format. Electronic news is nice because it is targeted and doesn't waste paper. Printing out your newspaper in the morning seems like the worst of both. You don't get the nice wide format, and you still waste the paper. Ugh.

    • by c0d3g33k (102699)

      Who would want to print their newspaper in the morning? Physical newspapers are convenient because of their wide format. Electronic news is nice because it is targeted and doesn't waste paper. Printing out your newspaper in the morning seems like the worst of both. You don't get the nice wide format, and you still waste the paper.

      I've seen this done at hotels as well as Bed and Breakfasts, particularly if they are off the beaten path. The local paper (if there is one) doesn't cut it and they can't get delivery of a current paper, so they print out an electronic edition formatted to fit on plain paper. It's rather better than no paper at all, and they often include the local weather forecast and calendar of events on another page. Nice to grab off the front desk on the way out to read in the car or shuttle.

    • Lastly: Who would want to print their newspaper in the morning?

      If the advertising meant free ink for me, I'd consider it.

      Of course, I'm thinking in the mindset of how web-services like GMail work. I doubt reality would work that way and I didn't bother reading the article. :D

      • by HiThere (15173)

        Reading the article wouldn't help. It was as light on details as the /. summary.

        But they aren't talking (currently) about isolated ads being printed. Merely things that include the ads that they choose. ("People weren't bothered"..."I think that's because they're already used to ads".)

        If you want to believe that their plans won't go any farther than what they're currently offering, be my guest. But I really doubt that you'd come out ahead, even if they continued to offer coupons for free ink.

    • by bkpark (1253468) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:12PM (#32598366) Homepage

      Lastly: Who would want to print their newspaper in the morning? Physical newspapers are convenient because of their wide format.

      Er, really? I'd kill to have newspaper printed letter-size, two-(or three-)column. The size of most newspapers is unwieldy, and especially if i'm trying to read it while walking (a frequent occasion as I commute on foot and pick up a free local daily on the way), i have to fold it over so that it's letter-size; or the wind blows it all over the place.

      As for who would actually want to get newspaper on paper, well, presumably people who are not stuck to their computer all day and don't have a Kindle, iPad, etc. And some quaint people still like things printed on paper, like books; I don't understand them but they do exist.

      • There are two ways to fold a newspaper. You have discovered method one: the broadway show guy-on-a-park-bench method. Most people not about to enter a song and dance number do not read it this way.

        The other way is to fold it over till it's about book-sized. the pages are set up so that this is convenient, except for stupid papers that don't break columns on the fold. This is how real people read the newspaper with their breakfast, or on the train. (but not the subway, where you need to keep an eye out

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by dAzED1 (33635)

        at around 7 cents per page for inject prints, how bloody expensive is the newspaper in your area that you'd pay that bloody much to print it out on your extraordinarily expensive per-page desktop printer? Just so you can accomplish what a different fold would accomplish...

        go ahead and pretend money is no object, and that you bought the low-cost web printer (printers are cheap, printing is expensive) because it matches your drapes. In a very short period of time, the cost of printing a newspaper daily woul

  • Does sending a page to a printer count as a "fax" as far as the law is concerned?

    • by 98 Rezz (912897) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:41PM (#32598138)
      No, faxes come through a series of wires. These ads come through a series of tubes. Completely different!
      • Hey, isn't, like, fiber just tubes?
      • Everyone knows that wires are just tubes with a bit of metal inside to give them strength. You got big tubes beneath the road and small tubes called wires inside the house.

        Here I will proof it by removing the useless metal from my network tube[CARRIER LOST]

      • by PiSkyHi (1049584)

        Wow, these "faxes" must be very small to fit into the wires! Are you sure they don't use regular tubes ?

    • by JSBiff (87824)

      Or, you could, you know, just NOT BUY such a STUPID printer. This is so not going to be a problem for me, since I won't buy the printer, so I don't give a rip. If you decide to buy this printer, I guess you've chosen how you'll make HP richer.

  • Post title here (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SilverHatHacker (1381259) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:39PM (#32598120)
    The scheduled delivery sounds kind of cool...course, if I have to walk over to my printer to get it, why wouldn't I just turn on the computer sitting right next to it?
    But if you're going to put ads on my paper, you dang well better be paying me for it.
    • by SheeEttin (899897)

      But if you're going to put ads on my paper, you dang well better be paying me for it.

      If by "paying", you mean "subsidizing your purchase", you'd be right. That's generally how ad-supported publications work. (TV, radio, newspapers, magazines, websites...)

    • by Idbar (1034346)

      "What we discovered is that people were not bothered by it [an advertisement]," Nigro said. "Part of it I think our belief is you're used to it. You're used to seeing things with ads."

      Better yet, I pay for the printer, the Internet access, the ink, and the paper they will be using to spam? People may not be bothered by ads if they get them free stuff as in public tv, or people is used to seeing things with ads as in online magazines or sports events, so prices go down. How is this going to benefit me?

  • by bizitch (546406) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:39PM (#32598124) Homepage

    When I am printing my very important sales proposal - and HP/Yahoo inject spam into it - and this costs me my sale .... I can sue their balls off yes?

  • by Manip (656104) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:40PM (#32598128)

    But really this is Quid pro quo, HP give you access to "free" services - in this case the web elements and in return you have to put up with a few adverts. It is in no way different from how GMail or HotMail operate. Will it cost you ink and make HP money, yes, but will you get the ability to e-mail printed documents to your printer and to automate printing web-content, also - yes.

    If you want an honest printer than invest in a Kodak already -- or better yet a laser printer for B&W documents.

    • When did it become "ok" to "pay" for "free" services by looking at ads? What kind of retarded philosophy is that? Either it's free or it's not. If it's free, there's no justification for including ads. If it's not free, HP should charge something for it, and then they'll see how popular their "feature" really is.
  • Firewall it (Score:4, Interesting)

    by sirsnork (530512) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:40PM (#32598130)
    Assuming you can't disable the feature I'll be firewalling it's IP address completly
    • by CSFFlame (761318)
      It's going to connect outbound I'd bet. Most people have routers with NAT so it's not going to be inbound.
    • Re:Firewall it (Score:5, Insightful)

      by natehoy (1608657) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:19PM (#32598408) Journal

      You can easily disable this feature. It's opt-in. Disable it by not opting in. See? Wasn't that easy?

      Seriously, is the article that complicated? you have to log into Yahoo's page, ask for content, and the content will be delivered as you ask for it, and Yahoo! will add an advert so they can justify setting up the system that automatically delivers the articles to you.

      Personally, I think the idea is asinine - I prefer my articles on-screen and I hate the idea of printing out everything I want to read on paper.

      But no one will be sneaking into your house and making your printer print anything you don't ask for.

      Yet.

      • by sammyF70 (1154563)

        Yep, but it really depends on how easy it is opt out for someone who thinks that the harddrive is the big box sitting on his desk (which happens to describe a LOT of people somehow). Knowing marketing people, I envision the process to be something like that ...

        Initializing Printer ...
        This is your first time. Please answer a few question to setup your new printer correctly ...
        What is your full name? ... Martha Grannyapple
        What is your phone number? ... 01234987654
        Are you behind a Firewall If you don't know the answer, press Y ... Y
        Enable HP IntelliAd Professional (tm)? If you don't know the answer, press Y ... ?
        If you don't know the answer, press Y. Enable HP IntelliAd Professional (tm)? ... H
        If you don't know the answer, press Y. Enable HP IntelliAd Professional (tm)? ... Y
        Processing ...
        Thank you for enabling HP IntelliAd Professional (tm).
        You can easily disable HP IntelliAd Professional (tm) by unchecking the 4rth option from the top in the MAIN->CONFIGURATION->INTERNET->SERVICES->INTELLIAD->SUBSCRIPTION->CONTROLS->OMGPONIES->NOODLYAPPENDAGE->ENABLE menu.
        Processing ...
        Please choose now which daily content should be used to fill the blanks between the ads ...

        • by sammyF70 (1154563)
          sigh ... I forgot the most important bit of course. The line stating that forfeiting the ads would be to forfeit the wonderfull new and particularly advanced features of the new printer.
  • LCD Screens (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Black Perl (12686) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:42PM (#32598150)

    My HP photo printer has a touchscreen LCD. I think most have an LCD of some sort. I can imagine HP thinking they could reserve some of the space for ads...

  • No HP For Me (Score:4, Interesting)

    by DarkKnightRadick (268025) <the_spoon.geo@yahoo.com> on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:44PM (#32598160) Homepage Journal

    Me: "Hello, Kodak? Yes, I'd like to buy one of your printers as long as you don't spam me with ads."
    Kodak: "Sure, not a problem. We aren't like HP."
    Me: "Awesome, I'll take ten."

    Of course that wasn't a real conversation, but if I had the money for ten printers, you better believe I'm giving my money to Kodak (or Canon, Canon makes good printers).

    • by X0563511 (793323)

      Okidata has some nice heavy-duty color laserjets...

    • by pecosdave (536896) *

      My mom has a Kodak printer.

      When she first got it, it only worked with Windows XP, Vista and OS X Tiger. Nothing else. It wasn't long until Leopard support was added.

      To this day I'm not sure if it supports anything else or not, I left my parents on Tiger for classic reasons. It does NOT use any generic standard filters or drivers, Linux printing at last check was just a pipe dream, it might work now, I haven't bothered checking.

      I wouldn't mind having a printer that doesn't gouge me on ink, but I'm not cha

      • I wouldn't mind having a printer that doesn't gouge me on ink, but I'm not changing operating systems to print, and I really want to limit my hacking around the problem time.

        Then don't get a printer that uses ink. It's cheaper to use the dye sub machines at the drug store anyway, for the few things you actually want color for.

  • donotwant! (Score:5, Interesting)

    by oddTodd123 (1806894) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:45PM (#32598166)

    I am dumbfounded by HP's decision-making here. "What we discovered is that people were not bothered by it [an advertisement]," Nigro said. "Part of it I think our belief is you're used to it. You're used to seeing things with ads."

    That sounds like a ringing endorsement for the printer. "Buy our printer! It will make you feel all warm and cozy because it has ads, like everything else in your life!" Ugh. It's appalling.

    • "What we discovered is that people were not bothered by it [an advertisement],"

      Ahh! So that's what it said? I couldn't tell due to a pop-up that appeared on that very page.

    • The problem here is they asked Catherine Tate if she was bothered by it...the conversation went a little like this:

      "Am I bothered by it?"
      "I'm not bothered by it."
      "I said I'm not bothered."
      "Look, I'm just not bothered."
      "I'M NOT BOTHERED!"

  • You asked for it (Score:5, Informative)

    by wiredlogic (135348) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:45PM (#32598180)

    From the article it seems that the ads are part of on demand publications that you choose to have sent to you. So this is definitely an opt-in sort of thing. It is conceivable that printers with preview displays could be perverted to show ads as well but that doesn't seem to be in the works yet.

  • That's how long it's going to take the community to figure out how it works and create a proxy for it that allows you to use all the cool services without the advertising. It'll probably even be built right into the next version of CUPS. BTW: Fuck you HP, It is my printer, not yours. That's why I don't print much (and if I do, I use my Epson printer with alternative ink and continuous system)

  • wasted effort :/ (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Kathars1s (1804824) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:48PM (#32598198)
    They'd be wasting the effort sending that garbage to me. I'd refuse to buy into whatever it was just out of principle. Send me an ink allowance and i don't really care as long as it doesn't start printing ads on my school papers. Lol The cost of an ink cartridge is more expensive than half of the printers themselves. Firewall it. :/
  • by dmomo (256005) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:50PM (#32598210) Homepage

    By purchase agreement of the free or subsidized printer? By perhaps getting a request to print on the lcd screen? Or maybe a popup on the computer that offers free coupons?

    Not to say it won't be sleazy. Not to say people won't be surprised by the ads.

    First let me say, I, like most of slashdot readers absolutely hate this crap. But to play Devil's advocate, suppose some consumers are not opposed to this kind of business relationship. Suppose they actually find value in it (ignoring the fact the you and I may consider it some kind of wrong). Should it be allowed to continue? I see insane ad practices happening time and time again. Sometimes they catch on and become normal. Other times they disappear (often quickly) as consumers revolt against them. Often, the ones that stick don't bother "normal" people. Whether it should or shouldn't is another topic, I guess. Where do you draw the line?

    My view is that our outcries against this stuff have their place. Hopefully it makes "normal" consumers more aware. Hopefully. Sometimes these practices stick. Sometimes they don't. Maybe the ones that do are a fair tradeoff. My concern is that the absurdity and intrusion escalates.

    There is a problem. Ads want to be targeted. We want to hate ads. Maybe it will always be that way. The best we can don is to keep people conscious so at least they're aware of what they could possibly be giving up when allowing them into their lives.

    This printer thing. I don't see how it will stick. But HP and Yahoo! are sure as Hell going to see. Let's just hope it doesn't set a precedent, or at least some kind of civil middle ground can be found.

    I absolutely hated Yahoo's new login screen. There was a Chevy Ad that took up the whole page. What I did like was the fact that there was a forum at the top of the screen to provide feedback on the ad. This is a new trend in my opinion. Let's hope our outcries continue to bring about changes like this.

    • Suppose some people in the world (all three of them) find value in being spammed by email. Should we therefore allow spammers to continue operating their "business", or is it still ok to put them in jail?
      • by dmomo (256005)

        Good point. Sure. Spammers should be allowed to spam "those" people. But not you and me. Of course, you can see how that would be a business model destined for failure. This comes back to what I refer to as "normal" people. "Majority" isn't the best word either, but maybe it's better. If most people actually found value in spam, then, sure. We who hate it would be the outliers. But most don't find value in spam, but most still receive spam.

        Again. I made the previous case as a Devil's advocate more

  • by divide overflow (599608) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @09:54PM (#32598238)
    This is such an obviously, outrageously bad idea that it boggles the mind. If HP goes ahead with such a plan it will richly deserve the universal drubbing it will receive. HP would have difficulty escaping the wrath of the marketplace and the brand would be severely tarnished for years to come.
  • Who the hell would put a printer online anyway without a firewall or some kind of IP whitelist?

    I mean it's not going to be the first time that hackers will jump into your network from a "bit too intelligent for it's own good" printer.

    Also, as a busy system administrator, do we really want another device to add to our security patch weeklies?

  • We've got a color samsung printer at work. I think we got it on sale for $150. That's even affordable for most home users. I think my dad's spent that much in HP ink this year.

  • by Jason Pollock (45537) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:03PM (#32598308) Homepage

    While the article is a little confusing, if you read it a couple of times, it becomes clear that the advertisements are only supplied with their "scheduled delivery" service. Basically, HP is signing up with content providers and Yahoo to provide content in your printer every morning.

    The subscriber selects the content (newspaper sections), HP is responsible for fetching + formatting + advertisement insertion. Yahoo provides the localised (through IP address lookup) advertisements.

    Basically, this is the Sci-Fi print-on-demand newspaper where the paper includes content from multiple sources.

    So, no, advertisements aren't inserted into the middle of your print job.

    I would say that the demand for the service is probably dwindling, but who knows. It will probably be a good little money maker for HP and Yahoo.

    • by dmomo (256005)

      And probably the outcry won't be all that great due to the fact that it's mainly to print "web stuff". And we're so used to seeing ads on the web.

  • by EmperorOfCanada (1332175) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:04PM (#32598312)
    My Lexmark printer driver is around 3 bytes long. I dumped HP when their driver crossed the 200MB level and installed a bunch of background processes.

    I didn't buy a computer to run HP software I bought it for many things a very small thing being to occasionally print. But HP seems to want to pretty well turn my desktop into an HP dedicated print server.

    I have only "Office Spaced" one electronic device in my life and it was my HP all-in-one. It was very satisfying to smash the crap out of it. All that thing was built for was to get me to buy ink. Every time I turned it on to scan the thing would go through this 2 minute cleaning cycle and use up some more ink. I would literally go through more than half an ink cartridge without printing a thing. A printer that uses ink when I am only scanning is just stupid. Then when it ran out of ink the whole menu system basically wouldn't let me get past the no-ink-complaining so that I could do hardly anything else with the printer. It wasn't an all-in-one is was a single purpose ink selling machine.

    So no surprise that HP is figuring out a way to screw their customers even harder. "Yes I bought your printer so that you could make money selling advertising." Or maybe people buy printers to print stuff; their own stuff.
    • Nod to Brother (Score:5, Informative)

      by PCM2 (4486) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:22PM (#32598424) Homepage

      I'm sitting next to a Brother ink jet printer right now. I really prefer lasers, but in this case I wanted a large format multi-function machine. My Brother will both print and scan up to 11x17" (equivalent to A3) and it cost me less than $200, shipped to my front door. It shipped with full, high-capacity ink cartridges, not HP's half cartridges. And while it does include some software it's pretty lightweight, and is basically used to handle features like networked scanning and a monitor program to let you know when the ink is low. Both are optional. And yes, Brother explicitly offers drivers for Linux.The print quality is what it is -- could be better, could be a lot worse -- and the build quality seems fairly plasticky, but that seems par for the course with today's printers. Overall my only complaint was that the price was so low it wasn't even a significant tax write-off.

      • Re:Nod to Brother (Score:4, Informative)

        by Fnord666 (889225) on Thursday June 17, 2010 @07:24AM (#32600830) Journal

        I'm sitting next to a Brother ink jet printer right now. I really prefer lasers, but in this case I wanted a large format multi-function machine. My Brother will both print and scan up to 11x17" (equivalent to A3) and it cost me less than $200, shipped to my front door. It shipped with full, high-capacity ink cartridges, not HP's half cartridges. And while it does include some software it's pretty lightweight, and is basically used to handle features like networked scanning and a monitor program to let you know when the ink is low. Both are optional. And yes, Brother explicitly offers drivers for Linux.The print quality is what it is -- could be better, could be a lot worse -- and the build quality seems fairly plasticky, but that seems par for the course with today's printers. Overall my only complaint was that the price was so low it wasn't even a significant tax write-off.

        I had a brother multifunction inkjet for a while. It worked well right up until the time when it ran out of one of the ink colors. At that point it started demanding a new ink cartridge and refused to do anything else. Fax? Nope. Scan? Nope. It was locked up until you replaced the ink cartridge. It was after midnight and I just wanted to fax out a contract. I did go to the office supply store the next day, but I replaced the printer instead.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I got rid of a Lexmark because their inkjet printers had ink that was too expensive, though, so pay attention to the model as well as the brand.

      I was also unhappy with Lexmark for trying to abuse the DMCA to lock people out from making compatible ink cartridges.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by vlueboy (1799360)

      Hmm, maybe not all then, but Lexmark printers are also guilty of installing must-have services. My 3 year old Z1420 installs 2. It also goes fails if you disable those, or at least bidirectional printing (to allow the otherwise low-ink dialog from requiring a local click that kills the functionality of remote print-jobs.) My printer croaks up license agreements on the printer-connected PC whenever I add a remote PC, and like every USB printer in existance, randomly fails to be recognized as 'Connected'" [youtube.com]

      Anyw

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You just listed all the reasons I swore to never buy another lexmark, bloated barely functional drivers along with "rebate" ink cartridges. You can also tack on the idiotic proprietary scanning methodology and the windows only compatibility.

      Im looking at an epsom A3 next I think, theres no reason you can't refill them indefinitely with the reset tool because the print heads are fixed (i.e. not part of the cartridge), can you imagine having an A3 printer where the cost of ink is 'negligible'

  • by steltho (1121605)

    HP's ePrint printers, some of which will become available next month, are connected to the user's home router, which means they will have an IP address.

    Good luck getting your users to correctly configure their routers to make this work.

    • I'd wager this isn't a push service. I bet there is some 600MB client that has to be installed on a computer on the network. Or perhaps, it uses UPNP and the printer just opens the ports it needs. Most people have all their network gear running with default settings and almost all recent consumer routers have upnp enabled by default.

  • Just turn the power off when you aren't using the printer. That is what I do with my printer now.
  • Tray 3? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Xacid (560407) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:12PM (#32598364) Journal

    You think if they started advertising for penis enlargement that they'd start going for my 11x17 tray just to prove a point/overcompensate?

  • If you consider the slippery slope theory, it may undermine the whole CAN SPAM Act. It looks like spamming where you cannot really opt out. If you really need internet printing you might be able to just hook the printer up to a computer and configure the computer to be a print server bypassing HP's software.
  • 'Targeted'?? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by MrMacman2u (831102) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:29PM (#32598474) Journal

    You mean these printers will ALSO leak out possibly sensitive information to the world (Yahoo) in order to target the advertisements that will be printed using the owner's ink and the owner's paper?

    Talk about the mother of all bad ideas. Even if this printer was FREE with these ad subsidies, you still have to pay for ink cartridges that are excessively expensive and the paper as well, so this will also add to waste and user costs.

    I guess this is just another in my long (and ever growing) list of reasons why I will never, EVER purchase a HP inkjet printer. I suggest everyone else vote with their wallets and abandon support for HP in favor of another company that doesn't steal information about what their users print in order to make users PAY with the ink they purchased to print advertisements based on information swiped from those very same users!

  • That's out of hand (Score:3, Insightful)

    by syousef (465911) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:36PM (#32598524) Journal

    What fucking bright spark in marketing thought this would be something ANY customer would want their printer to do, and what idiot manager approved it on the basis that people would put up with it? Someone should bill them for the paper, ink and recycling costs. $1000/picoliter isn't it? Fuckers!!!

  • Port 631, anyone? (Score:3, Informative)

    by RightwingNutjob (1302813) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:38PM (#32598532)
    I've been able to print from off-site for years. I just have to tunnel in through a firewall to get at my printer so that I don't act as the building charity copy center, but how is any of this new?
  • Test the laws (Score:3, Interesting)

    by AHuxley (892839) on Wednesday June 16, 2010 @10:55PM (#32598608) Homepage Journal
    and Google out by calling ''targeted' advertisements" a mistake.
  • But I had a printer from HP once. At one point when I tried to print the action failed and it gave me an error. Did the error give any hint of why the print failed? Of course not, it just told me "Print failed" which was obvious and useless. So now I'm supposed to believe a company that could even manage to generate a proper error message can handle something like preventing spam? Yeah, I'm not buying it. (Oh for what it's worth it was a network permission issue. I had to set up a guest account so printing
  • So basically what this new service is that you get a free "newsletter" that is automatically printed for you at a scheduled time. Bit like getting your own newspaper printed before you wake up like a coffee machine and bread maker on a timer but instead of just printing the same page for everyone, they make the ads in the newspaper dynamic, targetted specifically at you.

    Pretty harmless... sure, the inkt and paper cost you money but a regular newspaper also costs money.

    But then, there used to be unwritten

  • by Animats (122034) on Thursday June 17, 2010 @12:53AM (#32599124) Homepage

    It's not "your" printer. You don't own the software in the printer, or the driver, or the service that handles spamming you. You're just licensing that. You're renting a printing service, and the landlord controls what you can do with the printer. Read your EULA.

  • by jonwil (467024) on Thursday June 17, 2010 @03:09AM (#32599628)

    With all the crap HP are doing lately, you would have to be stupid to buy a HP printer.

    Get a printer from a decent company such as Canon or Epson or Brother.

  • by daveime (1253762) on Thursday June 17, 2010 @03:22AM (#32599706)

    It's bad enough that HP printers INSIST on printing a test page seemingly every time you cycle the power, or remove and reinsert a cartridge after shaking it to see how much ink is left.

    It's bad enough that they insist on bundling over 100 fucking meg of software when all you really want is the bloody printer driver.

    It's bad enough (environmentally) that it's probably more economical to buy a new printer that comes with "free" starter cartridges than to buy replacement cartridges for your existing printer ... at least here in Philippines prices about 1500 pesos ($33 USD) for a printer, and 1700 pesos ($37 USD) for a b/w and color cartridge.

    Now they're being allowed to spam your printer with internet ads (full colour of course) ?

    Fuck HP, tired of their bullshit.

  • Can't Firewall it (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Culture20 (968837) on Thursday June 17, 2010 @05:11AM (#32600164)
    Everyone keeps saying "Firewall it!", but that defeats the purpose of the printer, which is to allow email-printing from HP's servers. If it can't get sent stuff from HP's servers, you can't email to it, but if it can be sent stuff from HP's servers, HP can send SPAM. Unless you've got a computer in between that does image recognition of any postscript attachments coming across the pipe, and edits out HP SPAM, you might as well just buy a model without the email feature.
  • Wait... (Score:3, Informative)

    by Thumper_SVX (239525) on Thursday June 17, 2010 @08:06AM (#32601194) Homepage

    Wait, people still print?

    Honestly, I only print stuff when someone insists these days. I haven't owned a printer at home in years; everything I need to reference is sent to a PDF which is then sync'ed to my iPhone. Signatures... digital. I think the last thing I printed was a gift affidavit that I had to get notarized in order to give a car to my ex wife in my divorce :)

    On topic though; when are we going to see the printer now with the optional automatic shredder attachment (spam filter)? :)

  • by tekrat (242117) on Thursday June 17, 2010 @08:32AM (#32601394) Homepage Journal

    I can see it now. Your new LCD monitor is sold to you as a 22 inch, but 1/4 of the screen is actually an ad server, so your actual display area is smaller than 22 inches.

    This is the new way.

    I see it happening on TV. Between the logos, the market ticker, the oil gusher cam, and the pop-up ads promoting upcoming shows, all we're left with on TV is a talking head and all you can see of him/her is an eye or nose jiggling about the screen.

We don't know who it was that discovered water, but we're pretty sure that it wasn't a fish. -- Marshall McLuhan

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