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YouTube Blocked In Pakistan 299

Posted by timothy
from the differential-fragility dept.
kokoko1 submits this snippet from The Telegraph, which reports that Facebook isn't alone — now YouTube, too, is being censored in Pakistan. "The blocking of YouTube comes a day after a Pakistani court blocked Facebook amid a growing row over a competition on the social networking website to design cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad." Update: 05/20 18:58 GMT by T : According to an anonymous reader, Wikipedia and Flickr are out, too.
Update: 05/21 12:11 GMT by KD : And now add Twitter to the blocked list. This post claims that more than 1,000 sites are being blocked in Pakistan.
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YouTube Blocked In Pakistan

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  • This is a self-limiting problem. Once they block enough of the internet, people who have become habituated on it will push for change.
    • Re:Self-limiting (Score:5, Insightful)

      by cytoman (792326) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @02:45PM (#32283124)
      In a poor country with only a fraction of the people being affected by blocking the internet, the critical mass for any push for change is absent.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by hguorbray (967940)
        and nothing of value was lost...

        I'm just sayin'
        • and nothing of value was lost...

          I'd love to share your sentiment, but since we're talking about a nuclear power, this is another troubling development.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by v1 (525388)

      ya, just look a China for example. (and good thing for them they have a lot more people)

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by nospam007 (722110) *

      Yeah, when they can no longer see funny cat videos, there will be a revolution.

  • Muhammad (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 20, 2010 @02:48PM (#32283164)

    >-|-O

  • The problem (Score:4, Interesting)

    by TheSpoom (715771) <slashdot&uberm00,net> on Thursday May 20, 2010 @02:48PM (#32283170) Homepage Journal

    This is great that people are pushing to force governments to drop their censorship. But it's not going to work, at least, not in the short term. The reason? Pakistan will be able to find at least a few people or companies that will build local versions of social networking sites, search engines, etc. that comply with their censorship requests. It's how capitalism works, only the government is saying "we've made you a captive market if you only play by our rules".

    Ultimately censorship will be killed by end to end encryption and onion routing.

    • by Feyshtey (1523799)

      Ultimately censorship will be killed by end to end encryption and onion routing.

      If they can censor the type of information that passes within their borders, what makes you think they cant control the method by which it is transfered?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Opportunist (166417)

        How? Disallow every kind of encrypted traffic and deep inspect everything else? How much of your GDP are you willing to throw at a futile attempt to hold back the ocean with a broom?

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Shakrai (717556) *

          How much of your GDP are you willing to throw at a futile attempt to hold back the ocean with a broom?

          Have you looked at North Korea lately?

        • by Feyshtey (1523799)
          The technology isnt exactly rocket science. It's very basic network administration.

          Do I recognize this packet? Yes? Allowed.
          Do I recognize this packet? No? Dropped.
    • Re:The problem (Score:4, Informative)

      by krkhan (1071096) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @03:23PM (#32283656) Homepage
      I am in Pakistan right now and find the whole situation amusing. Perhaps they should block queries to root name servers as well since ICANN are not blocking the queries to zones that can resolve blasphemous domains. Yeah. That would service the Internet *right*!
    • by bsDaemon (87307)

      But can they do it without resorting to outsourcing to India? Maybe they can trade Kashmir for a domestic pressure-release valve?

    • by Thomasje (709120)

      Ultimately censorship will be killed by end to end encryption and onion routing.

      I'm sure any government that is serious about censorship will eventually also ban encryption, or at least restrict it to only algorithms that they have a back door to. Such a ban is easy to enforce by forcing ISPs to pass only government-whitelisted protocols and nothing else.

  • Mohammed (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Vinegar Joe (998110) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @02:51PM (#32283210)

    (((:~(>

    Filter error: Your comment looks too much like ascii art.

    Well duh!

    • Re:Mohammed (Score:4, Funny)

      by Rallias Ubernerd (1760460) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @03:03PM (#32283374) Journal
      hmm (((:~>>>>>> i fixed it for you
    • by tekrat (242117)

      Pretty good. I think I'll change my sig right now....

    • by Jeng (926980)

      There are many people named Mohammed. It is an extremely common name, if its not labeled as the Prophet Mohamed I don't see how they can complain.
       

  • by CSHARP123 (904951) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @02:53PM (#32283238)
    Facebook is only banned in Pakistan, not in Saudi Arabia or India (I think second largest muslim population) or Indonesia. Some muslim countries may not care I guess.
    • They have no problem with Goatse.cx either.

    • by phantomfive (622387) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @03:43PM (#32283992) Journal
      Pakistan has a problem in that they are more of a democracy, and more liberal politically, thus they allow the radicals who are too radical for other countries. For example, if someone named (randomly) "Osama Bin Ladin" called for vast changes in the Saudi Arabian government based on muslim principles, he might find it needful to flee the country. However, in Pakistan that sort of thing is allowed. They've thus become a magnet for radical types.

      Saudi Arabia in many ways has a more secular government, but it is a dictatorship. They don't care so much about Mohammad drawings, but do care about criticisms of the state.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Grishnakh (216268)

        Saudi Arabia in many ways has a more secular government, but it is a dictatorship. They don't care so much about Mohammad drawings, but do care about criticisms of the state.

        Yes, this is exactly why Saudi Arabia probably has the best kind of government it can have. If they had a democracy, it'd be much worse, because the people are so backwards. The rulers there are much more forward-thinking than the people, so they keep the silliness from going too far.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          they keep the silliness from going too far.

          How far beyond a full-scale implementation of Shari'a law according to the interpretation of the strictest Islamic school (Salafi) can you get? I mean, we're speaking of public beheadings, stonings and amputations here.

  • Ban /. (Score:5, Funny)

    by Archangel Michael (180766) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @02:54PM (#32283256) Journal

    O
      / ^ \
      * | -- Mohammad Carrying a bomb
          ^
        / \

    Perhaps now, Pakistan will ban /. and we can stop hearing about stupid Pakistani Muslims who get offended of stick drawings.

    • aww crap, stripping characters fubard my drawing .Oh well, you get the point

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by blind biker (1066130)


            O
          / ^ \
          * | -- Mohammad Carrying a bomb
            ^
          _/ \_

      FTFY.
      And if someone is more talented than me and the OP, please add a beard ---> #

  • by cytoman (792326) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @03:00PM (#32283334)
    [snark]...blocking the internet ultimately resulted in such an increase in work productivity that Pakistan shot to the top of the list of developed countries in record time! [/snark]
  • These radicals think depictions of Muhammad are disallowed out of respect, but in actuality it has to do with the same principles found in Christianity: Do not make idols for worship. Ergo, none of the profits are supposed to be immortalized through depictions. And, wouldn't you think the prophets themselves would care more about human life than a stupid image of themselves -- especially when people are completely misunderstanding the scriptural context.
  • Well, that's sure to make what started as a silly Facebook joke become international news, isn't it.

  • Just confirming that Flickr is indeed blocked. Trying to access the site gives a "This Site is Restricted" msg. Wikipedia on the other hand seems to be working just fine.
  • So they want to block every page that could remotely even as much as talk about this? Good effing luck! Cut the international lines, anything short of that won't do it.

  • religion FAIL (Score:5, Insightful)

    by corbettw (214229) <corbettwNO@SPAMyahoo.com> on Thursday May 20, 2010 @03:12PM (#32283476) Journal

    How is killing people or even just protesting over a drawing not equating the subject of the drawing to godhood? In other words, these idiots have turned Mohammad into an idol by their actions and words, and so are violating the very law they seek to enforce on others.

    That counts as one big FAIL in my book.

    • Re:religion FAIL (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Shakrai (717556) * on Thursday May 20, 2010 @03:21PM (#32283616) Journal

      In other words, these idiots have turned Mohammad into an idol by their actions and words, and so are violating the very law they seek to enforce on others.

      I am not an expert on the Islamic faith, but I rather suspect they turned their backs on Mohammad when they started blowing up women and children.

      • by H0p313ss (811249)

        I rather suspect they turned their backs on Mohammad when they started blowing up women and children.

        I suspect that those who blow up women and children in the name of God will argue that it depends entirely on WHICH women and children you blow up.

        Meanwhile the angular velocity of Mohammad spinning in his grave represents enough potential energy to provide the whole planet with electricity.

      • Re:religion FAIL (Score:5, Insightful)

        by syousef (465911) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @05:08PM (#32285398) Journal

        In other words, these idiots have turned Mohammad into an idol by their actions and words, and so are violating the very law they seek to enforce on others.

        I am not an expert on the Islamic faith, but I rather suspect they turned their backs on Mohammad when they started blowing up women and children.

        It all depends on how you interpret the religion, or rather how your religious leaders interpret it, since ordinary people are always asked by religious leaders to take things on "faith". (The degree to which you are asked to take things on faith differs, but this underlies every major religion as far as I can tell).

        Faith is code for disconnecting your mind and "believing" what you are told without quesiton. This is why religion - even "moderate" religion - can be so damaging. You surrender your ability to reason about things to people that have their own agendas. Whether you're asked to believe in the son of God saving us from sin, the great prophet Mohammed showing us the way, the wise Buddha teaching us how to be at spiritual peace, or the Xenu and space aliens hardly matters. With it comes instruction on how you must live your life, and what you should do, and the faithful may not question the "true word" of whomever.

    • Correction. you forgot "=" sign.

      Religion = FAIL
  • Obligatory (Score:4, Funny)

    by Dunbal (464142) * on Thursday May 20, 2010 @03:23PM (#32283648)

    And nothing of value was lost.

  • Also the 20th, 19th, 18th, 17th, 16th and 15th.

    They grudgingly permit the 14th.

  • How about Google? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Thraxy (1782662)
    Shouldn't they be blocking Google as well? I mean... 1.990.000 results on Google Images. Isn't that like mass blasphemy or something?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by nattt (568106)

      That's not blasphemy, that's massphemy!

      Of course, there's no real offence going on - not like the kind of offence we feel when people are killed, buildings burned, or little girl's are genital mutilated, or raped then beaten for being raped or stoned, or any of the other atrocities commited by the "religion of peace". It's feigned offence for the political reason of giving their population something to hate because they're so oppressed that they need something to keep their mind off their poor miserable liv

  • Last time the Pakistani government told Pakistani ISPs to block YouTube they ended up hijacking their IP prefix [ripe.net] for pretty much the entire Internet.

  • Considering it is an Islamic state I will assume porn is also banned as well.

    Whats left on there? Just this: http://www.this-page-intentionally-left-blank.org/ [this-page-...-blank.org] ?

    Time to just turn the internet off and run a Pakistan LAN.

    • I don't know about Pakistan but in the UAE (Dubai, Abu-Dhabi, etc.) the Internet is completely proxied such that any "suspect" web sites are blocked.

  • by Target Practice (79470) on Thursday May 20, 2010 @04:05PM (#32284386)

    I wish they could have been quieter about this. My state senators (Utah) are probably already phoning them to ask how they can get a piece of that sanitized Internet pie.

  • Pakistan News (Score:5, Interesting)

    by BCGlorfindel (256775) <klassenk AT brandonu DOT ca> on Thursday May 20, 2010 @04:46PM (#32285066) Journal

    If only fluff pieces like this could bring attention to the more real issues in Pakistan. Like the recent assassination of Benazir Bhutto, the first and only head of a muslim state. It's unfortunate in the extreme that the country's court has now been more effective and interested in this youtube and facebook ban than it's pursuit of Benazir's killers.

    This ban is not the only thing that has been more important to many of Pakistan's leadership either. Since Benazir's widow became president, the entirety of the country's opposition parties, courts and media have given more attention to corruption charges against Benazir's widow than to the pursuit of her killers.

    Former dictator Musharraf is a leading suspect as a co-conspirator in her assassination. The latest news from him is his intent to return to Pakistan, at the head of a new political party that will include the PML-Q. The PML-Q is one Pakistan's strongest conservative Islamic parties, and one the ones advocating the strongest for this ban, for charges of corruption against Benazir's widow, and one of the quietest about her assassins still running free.

    Well, I guess that's my small part in trying to draw attention from the 'fluff' over this ban to the real problems it is a symptom of.

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