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Amiga Demonstration Helps Win Against Patent Troll

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  • It's True. (Score:5, Funny)

    by dangitman (862676) on Friday May 14, 2010 @09:34PM (#32216004)
    There's nothing that Amiga demos cannot accomplish. They are the stuff that drives our society forward.
    • No respect. (Score:3, Insightful)

      by AmigaHeretic (991368)
      Circa 1985 people! Come one. ;-)
    • Re:It's True. (Score:5, Informative)

      by digitalchinky (650880) <dtchky@gmail.com> on Friday May 14, 2010 @09:42PM (#32216066)

      Although I saw my first piece of digital porn on the commodore 64 (Samantha fox if I recall) - it wasn't until the Amiga came along that I ~really~ saw porn, with actual skin tone. (Sheds a tear) It certainly drove my collection forward.

      • by EdIII (1114411) on Friday May 14, 2010 @10:05PM (#32216244)

        As long as we are reminiscing of ye olden times in porn I remember when it was ground breaking to incrementally display the porn as it was being transferred over the modem. Ahhhh... the memories.

        To this day that magical sound of two modems negotiating a connection gets me excited.

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          modem noise the geek Viagra i bet your wife or lover gets pissy when you have to hook a 19k modem up just to get in the mood but i bet they are equally as happy that it takes 3 days to finish xD
          • > but i bet they are equally as happy that it takes 3 days to finish xD

            Boss calling up on Monday morning: "Hey are you coming yet?".
        • by MadCow42 (243108)

          Ah.... ASCII porn... The good ol days!

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Alien Being (18488)

          Ahhhh... the mammaries.

          There, FTFY.

      • Yah, it was really hard to drool over Sammy on a green Hercules screen...
      • Thanks for reminding me of my age... Ohhh, Samantha pics on the C64... Now help me get those damn kids of my lawn, would you, please?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by falconwolf (725481)

      There's nothing that Amiga demos cannot accomplish.

      I recall the first tyme I saw an Amiga demo IRL. It was set up to run the Mac OS and not just Workbench. Next to it was a new Mac running the same Mac OS. The Amiga ran the Mac OS faster than the Mac did. Another Amiga was running MS DOS and Windows 3.x.

      Falcon

      • by wvmarle (1070040)

        Wait a moment. MacOS and Win 3.1 in their time being able to run on the same hardware?

        Win 3.1 has always been restricted to x86 processors.

        MacOS in it's time on what was it the Motorola 68something or so. Definitely not Intels. Win 3.1 was from even before the PPC era. Especially if Amigas were still around other than as museum piece.

        Now I don't know the hardware of the Amiga but I can not believe it would be able to happily emulate a totally different hardware layout, and still be speedy.

        Or am I missin

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by blincoln (592401)

          Wait a moment. MacOS and Win 3.1 in their time being able to run on the same hardware?
          Win 3.1 has always been restricted to x86 processors.

          Back in the olden days, it was possible to buy an expansion card for several types of non-x86 system that had all the x86 hardware necessary to run DOS and Windows.

          I had one for my parents' Apple IIe - the Applied Engineering PC Transporter. IIRC, it was similar to the Atari 2600 module for the ColecoVision in that it really just used the Apple for its keyboard and monit

  • by i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) on Friday May 14, 2010 @09:36PM (#32216022) Homepage Journal
    Commodore has sushi and sold it as fish, sadly. The Amiga demos always kicked ass even if you weren't doing X.
    • by dangitman (862676) on Friday May 14, 2010 @11:01PM (#32216570)

      Commodore has sushi and sold it as fish, sadly.

      That's actually an insightful analogy on more levels than was probably intended. There was a time in the Western world, before sushi had ascended to its current status, that it was much easier to sell fish & chips than it was to sell sushi. People were actually grossed out by the idea - "Raw fish? Ewwww. Plus it's ethnic food!"

      So, the decision to market it as fried fish or sushi was not so clear-cut in the 1980s. Nobody really knew what to make of the home computer market. It was a quirky world that could have become anything, and monumental marketing/strategy blunders were commonplace. Although there's little that can top the hilarity of an earlier era's bizarre attempt at marketing computers. [wikipedia.org]

      • by sznupi (719324)

        Some parts of Western world eat sea fish which are basically raw. It's just that they are not considered to be anything "fancy"... (herring, sardine, sprat, mackerel in salt or vinegar; also in oil or sour cream though those, possibly, somehow less raw)

      • by Thomasje (709120)

        There was a time in the Western world, before sushi had ascended to its current status, that it was much easier to sell fish & chips than it was to sell sushi. People were actually grossed out by the idea

        People in the Netherlands, northern Germany, and Scandinavia eat raw herring and have done so for ages -- it's a delicacy. Also, raw oysters, steak tartare... I'll grant that raw dead animals were never as prominent on the European menu as in Japanese cuisine, but they were certainly there before the current wave of Asian food started. :-)

        • by dangitman (862676)

          People in the Netherlands, northern Germany, and Scandinavia eat raw herring and have done so for ages -- it's a delicacy.

          I probably should have narrowed my scope to "the English-speaking Western World" but that doesn't quite work either. Lacking another meaningful category, let's just say Britain, America, Australia, etc. The white trash countries, basically.

          Also, I wouldn't quite put things like oily fish, caviar and oysters in the same category as sushi (although they are used as ingredients in sushi). They're a lot more meat-like and strongly-flavored than things like white fish served raw.

          Anyway - I was just talking about

      • by pclminion (145572)

        Although there's little that can top the hilarity of an earlier era's bizarre attempt at marketing computers.

        Now that's really disturbing. Not the sexist tone of an old ad from a bygone day, no... that's expected. What's disturbing is how women are treated like pieces of meat, drooled over, ridiculed, sexually harassed and frightened away from computer science IN THIS DAY AND AGE. I mean for fuck's sake, here's an advertisement talking about a woman's place in the kitchen and then nonchalantly, without ev

        • by dangitman (862676)
          Women were pretty much the first programmers, for example working in cryptography to decode Nazi transmissions in WWII. Then of course, there's Ada Lovelace [wikipedia.org], considered the world's first programmer, and who had a vision of programming which went beyond others.
    • There were two big things that worked to kill Amiga, other than simply not being DOS (which was the standard even back then):

      1) Cost. Amigas cost a whole lot more than other computers. Also let's not forget that in general computers were expensive. So when you were already talking something that was a major purchase and then talking something that was more expensive on top of it, well that gets real hard for people to justify. Sure the higher cost bought you something better, but the money isn't always ther

      • by babyrat (314371)

        It was too expensive compared to other computers to every become the system most people owned, and it fell behind when it came to pros

        Sounds like bad marketing to me...

      • by Psion (2244)
        What?

        Amigas were cheaper than the IBM PCs and short list of clones available at the time and much less expensive than the Macs. They weren't cheaper than the 8 bit computers of their day, but then they weren't 8 bit computers. The Amiga had four channel, stereo sound compared to the bleeps and bloops of PCs and Macs, 4096 colors instead of 16 or plain black and white, and a multitasking operating system a decade before Windows. And because of the assistance of parallel processing, the Amiga could execute
        • by dangitman (862676)

          They weren't cheaper than the 8 bit computers of their day, but then they weren't 8 bit computers.

          Actually, if I recall correctly, there was a time when Amigas cost less than the Apple IIe. They certainly weren't expensive compared to Macs and IBM PCs.

          The Amiga had four channel, stereo sound compared to the bleeps and bloops of PCs and Macs,

          Arrgh, this is the second time in the last 24 hours that somebody has claimed that Macs only made beeping sounds. It's just not true. From the very first Mac they had audio. Not as good as an Amiga's, but certainly not "bleeps and bloops." You could even get sound digitizers for them.

          What's more baffling is how people make this claim, when at the very laun

        • by mattack2 (1165421)

          ...and the GS has an Ensoniq chip with 32 channels (though they're paired, and one pair used by the ROM routines.. so essentially 15 channel sound)..

        • by jgrahn (181062)

          What? Amigas were cheaper than the IBM PCs and short list of clones available at the time and much less expensive than the Macs. They weren't cheaper than the 8 bit computers of their day, but then they weren't 8 bit computers.

          True. When I bought an A500 as my first computer in 1990 it was clearly the smart choice for a poor student.

          The DOS world competed by branding the Amiga a "gaming" computer, despite the fact that at that time superior gaming performance clearly demonstrated superior performance acros

  • by AHuxley (892839) on Friday May 14, 2010 @09:37PM (#32216030) Homepage Journal
    Enjoyed the ""Your honor, we shouldn't be required to look for prior art that precedes our invention, because shurely such prior art would be outdated and irrelevant"" comment.
    Wont someone legislate to close this prior art loophole.
  • by Itninja (937614) on Friday May 14, 2010 @09:41PM (#32216060) Homepage
    Seriously, is that some kind of Mexican Facebook?
  • Ahead of the curve (Score:5, Interesting)

    by hhawk (26580) on Friday May 14, 2010 @09:42PM (#32216068) Homepage Journal

    I always loved the way the Amiga offered functions other computers of the same era never came close to matching..

    I love the quote from the owner who produced the working model.. "My Amiga Killed a Troll!"

    • by sznupi (719324)

      You know, with a little twist (and still discarding NeXT machines - more than "close" to Amiga, but hideously expensive), saying "other computers of the same era never came close to matching" (emphasis mine) is too strong of a statement.

      Even contemporary 8-bit computers came somewhat close, after a while; with operating systems like Contiki [wikipedia.org] or SymbOS [wikipedia.org]. And let us not forget what was rather quickly possible with Ata...uhm...ok, I won't go there ;)

      • by Tumbleweed (3706)

        Even contemporary 8-bit computers came somewhat close, after a while; with operating systems like Contiki or SymbOS.

        I was an 8-bit computer user. I owned an Amiga. You, sir (?) never used an Amiga, obviously. 8-bit? Contiki? You're out of your mind. But that's okay, because the Amiga is dead, and I'm no longer required to kill infidels like you. :)

        • by sznupi (719324)

          I also started on 8-bits. Plus I'm actually from a place where Amiga, for half a decade, was the standard home computer; PCs got its foothold only in the late 90's.

          Notice I objected (and not very strongly) only to the word "never"; mentioned not only Contiki, also SymbOS (watch this video [google.com]; you will really tell me that's not "somewhat close"?)

        • by hairyfeet (841228)

          Bah! You kids and your fancy pants Amiga. We had to PEEK and POKE everything on our VIC 20s [wikipedia.org] and pray to the primitive electronic gods that our sisters didn't record over our programming cassettes with Culture Club! You kids with your wasteful 256Kb of RAM. Try getting everything done in only 5Kb!

          Now get off my lawn, ya spoiled brat! /wanders off muttering about ungrateful kids with their gigawhatsits and megawhosits and lazy gooeys/

      • by tsm_sf (545316)
        Apple IIgs demos had just started to kick amazing ass when Cupertino discontinued it. That machine was the spiritual opposite of the Lisa, but doomed just the same.

        ((Anyone remember when WUStL was the hub of the warez scene? *sheds a silent tear*))
      • by amiga3D (567632) on Saturday May 15, 2010 @12:28AM (#32217102)
        Really the Amiga was the beginning of Multimedia in home computing. It had Multimedia even before the term had been coined. It wasn't until Windows 98 that I really felt that the Amiga was becoming obsolete. After 4 years with no work it started to fall away. I had to move on to linux. More stable than AmigaDos but it took awhile before I felt totally happy with it.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I have five working Amigas sitting next to me. FIVE. All with Commodore branding, and including an A1000. University dumpsters were a gold mine for these things a few (by which I mean five) years ago. Groklaw speaks as if someone restored a System/360 or something!

  • Say what? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by SEWilco (27983) on Friday May 14, 2010 @09:45PM (#32216094) Journal
    The success is all very nice and all, but what was the disputed issue?
  • OS-9 (Score:5, Interesting)

    by markdavis (642305) on Friday May 14, 2010 @10:02PM (#32216232)

    Let us not forget that OS-9 was doing it before Amiga.... and that was also submitted by someone as prior art from 1983:

    http://www.post-issue.org/prior_art/83/detail [post-issue.org]

    OS-9 was my first "real" OS, before eventually switching to Unix, then Linux. Back in the day, it was extremely impressive.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by NetLarry (1439377)
      I remember my Radio Shack Color Computer 3 (running OS-9), with 128K (!!) of RAM, the expansion interface, HDD controller with 5MB hard drive, Floppy controller, and RS232 pack connected to a DT100 dumb terminal. And it actually would run programs on the TV screen and the terminal simultaneously. Talk about a stroll down memory lane... NetLarry
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by kimvette (919543)

        The C=128 could also do this; you could hook up a split composite (now called S-video) and RGBI monitor at the same time and have an app display different outputs on each screen.

  • http://mail.ale.org/pipermail/ale/2010-May/119052.html [ale.org] From the Atlanta Linux Enthusiasts mailing list. Way to go Aaron!!
  • Since it's written in the constitution that our government should promote useful art, can we please make doing the exact opposite a federal crime and send some people to a federal pound-you-ass prison??

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